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Four MLB Greats - 1928 This impromptu photo shows Lou Gehrig, Tris Speaker, Ty Cobb, and Babe Ruth before a New York Yankees-Philadelphia Athletics game in 1928. The photo may have been taken on Opening Day; the heavy jackets worn by Gehrig and Ruth suggest a cool temperature. Not a bad core of players to start a team, I'd say! (Imagine what their salaries would be today!) The A's gave the Yankees a darn good run for the AL pennant in 1928 but came up just a bit short, winning 98 games and finishing in second spot just 2.5 games out of first place. The Yankees took 16 of 22 games versus the A's in 1928. Speaker and Cobb were both winding down their spectacular careers that season. Some baseball scholars believe their advancing ages--they were both in their forties--may have been a hindrance to the A's. Speaker could no longer play center field effectively. He was used mostly as a pinch hitter by the middle of July and appeared in no games at all after August. The Athletics' younger stars (fellows like Al Simmons, Mickey Cochrane, and Lefty Grove) led them to three straight AL pennants from 1929 through 1931.
Tags: MLB  Cobb,  Ruth,  Speaker,  Gehrig 
Added: 9th December 2014
Views: 1229
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Posted By: Lava1964
You Bet Your Life - Bill Cosby Remake One of the most enduring game shows of all time was the original You Bet Your Life. It was hosted by Groucho Marx first on radio in 1947 and continued well into the television era until 1961. The quiz game was clearly secondary to the superbly ad-libbed interviews Marx had with the contestants. A new version of You Bet Your Life, hosted by Bill Cosby, aired from September 7, 1992 to June 4, 1993 in syndication. Cosby was joined on this show by a female announcer and sidekick, Robbi Chong; she was referred to as "Renfield." Organist Shirley Scott contributed the jazzy theme music. The program was taped in Philadelphia. Three couples competed, each couple playing the game individually. After the couple was introduced, they spent time chatting with Cosby. When the interview was done, the game began. Each couple was staked with $750 and were then asked three questions within a category presented at the start of the game. Before each question, the couple made a wager, which would be added to their winnings if they were correct or subtracted if they were incorrect. The secret word in this version, worth $500, was represented by a blackbird wearing a sweatshirt from Temple University, Cosby's alma mater. The couple with the most money played for an additional $10,000. Although Cosby was renowned for ad-libbing funny exchanges with audience members as part of his stand-up comedy routines, he was no Groucho Marx. (Who, besides Groucho, was?) Low ratings prompted the cancellation of the series after just one season.
Tags: remake  You  Bet  Your  Life  Bill  Cosby  syndicated 
Added: 21st August 2011
Views: 1709
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Posted By: Lava1964
Muhammad Ali Photo 2011 From the sad to see department: This photo of Muhammad Ali was taken as he arrived at Joe Frazier's funeral in Philadelphia in November 2011. Ali was 69 at the time.
Tags: Muhammad  Ali  boxing 
Added: 23rd November 2011
Views: 1308
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Posted By: Lava1964
Baseballs Lost Teams This is an informative short feature about three MLB teams that were in existence for half a century but found new homes in the 1950s: the St. Louis Browns, the Boston Braves, and the Philadelphia Athletics.
Tags: MLB  lost  teams  defunct 
Added: 2nd January 2014
Views: 1715
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Posted By: Lava1964
Aloysius Travers - Emergency Pitcher One of the most interesting pitching lines in MLB history belongs to Aloysius (Al) Travers, a 20-year old seminary student, who pitched once for the Detroit Tigers in 1912--a complete-game 24-2 loss to the defending World Series champion Philadelphia A's. Of course there has to be an explanation: Travers wasn't really a pitcher! He was hastily recruited among a group of local Philadelphia amateur ballplayers to replace the striking Detroit Tigers. The Tigers' regulars walked off the field shortly before game time at Philadelphia's Shibe Park on Saturday, May 18, 1912 to protest the suspension of center fielder Ty Cobb. (Cobb had jumped into the stands during a game in New York three days earlier to fight a heckler.) Faced with a potential forfeit and a huge fine, the Tigers' management recruited Travers and other amateur players as emergency replacements. Travers was the ersatz Tigers' only pitcher--and he wasn't even good enough to make the baseball team at St. Joseph's College. Be that as it may, Travers was forced to face some of the most vaunted hitters in the majors in front of 20,000 fans. In eight innings, he allowed 24 runs (14 earned), and 26 hits. Travers also walked seven A's and struck out one. He was paid $25 for his efforts. Travers, shown here in a photograph taken late in his life, eventually became a priest. To date, Travers is the only priest known to have pitched in an MLB game.
Tags: baseball  Aloysius  Travers  Detroit  Tigers 
Added: 18th July 2012
Views: 2730
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Posted By: Lava1964
What Would You Do and Double Dare 90s host  Marc Summers says half his face was wiped out in a car accident. Week of August 5, 2012 in Philadelphia, Marc Summers: Car Accident 'Wiped Out' Half My Face Marc Summers is grateful to be alive after sustaining serious facial injuries during a car accident last week. The 60-year-old star, who currently hosts The Food Network's "Unwrapped," was a passenger in a taxi cab in Philadelphia when the vehicle hydroplaned during a "torrential downpour," Summers told People. PLAY IT NOW: Billy Bush Reveals Details Of His Bicycling Accident & Complicated Recovery "I knew when [the driver] lost control that I was in trouble. I was on the phone with my supervising producer and I said, 'Oh my God, we're going to crash!'" he told the mag, recalling the harrowing moments right before the wreck. "Next thing I knew, I woke up and had blood all over me." Summers' head slammed against the plastic partition between the cab's front and backseats upon impact, badly damaging his face. VIEW THE PHOTOS: We Like What They’re Cooking: Stars Of The Food Network! "Everything on the left side from my eye socket down was just wiped out," he told the mag. "My eye socket got all swollen. I'm having trouble seeing completely out of the left eye... There's lots of titanium and screws in my face." Adding, "I was pretty lucky that I didn't have brain damage." Summers, a longtime TV producer and former host of Nickelodeon's "Double Dare," underwent a four-hour operation at the hand of a plastic surgeon following the accident. VIEW THE PHOTOS: Celebrity Chefs & Foodies While the star is still in tremendous pain, he said his doctor is confident the lengthy operation was successful. "Everything went back into place," he told the mag. "In a few weeks, the swelling will go down and no one will ever know ... I'll be a new guy." VIEW THE PHOTOS: Slime Time! 2012 Nickelodeon’s Kids’ Choice Awards Though he faces an arduous recuperation and is still having difficulty chewing solid foods, Summers is already on a mission to prevent this type of accident from happening to anyone else. "Appreciate all the good wishes from everyone. Pain a little less each day. Will you help me in a campaign to rid cabs of plastic partitions?" he Tweeted on Saturday, later adding that the blockades "serve no purpose other than hurting people" and are "way [too] close to backseat despite seat belts." -- Erin O'Sullivan Copyright 2012 by NBC Universal, Inc. All rights reserved.
Tags: What  Would  You  Do  and  Double  Dare  90s  host    Marc  Summers  says  half  his  face  was  wiped  out  in  a  car  accident. 
Added: 19th August 2012
Views: 1824
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Posted By: masonx31
1993 to 1998 for the Green Bay Packers Minister of Defense Tribute Reggie White This is going in the 90's section due to the fact that he is best remembered as a Green Bay Packer from the 1993-1998. So far probably (based on opinion) the best Defensive End person in the Game of football! Go Pack Go! Reginald Howard "Reggie" White (December 19, 1961 – December 26, 2004) He played for the NFL's Philadelphia Eagles, Green Bay Packers and Carolina Panthers, becoming one of the most decorated players in NFL history. The two-time NFL Defensive Player of the Year, 13-time Pro Bowl and 12-time All-Pro selection holds 2nd place all-time amongst career sack leaders with 198.5 (behind Bruce Smith's 200 career sacks) and was selected to the NFL 75th Anniversary All-Time Team, NFL 1990s All-Decade Team and the NFL 1980s All-Decade Team. During his professional career, he was also known for his Christian ministry as an ordained Evangelical minister, leading to his nickname, "The Minister of Defense." White is a member of the College Football Hall of Fame and the Pro Football Hall of Fame. In 1993, White became a free agent. He was signed by the Green Bay Packers, where he played for six seasons. White notched up another 68.5 sacks to become, at the time, the Packers' all-time leader in that category (second now to Kabeer Gbaja-Biamila who has 74.5 registered sacks). White was also just as valued for his role as a team leader. He helped the Packers to two Super Bowls, including a victory in Super Bowl XXXI. That victory was the only championship White ever shared in at any level. In 1998, White was named the NFL Defensive Player of the Year Memphis Showboats:(1984–1985) Philadelphia Eagles: (1985–1992) Green Bay Packers: (1993–1998) Carolina Panthers: (2000)
Tags: 1993  to  1998  for  the  Green  Bay  Packers  Minister  of  Defense  Tribute  Reggie  White   
Added: 20th August 2012
Views: 1197
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Posted By: masonx31
Jim Joyce Blown Call Incident It was one of the strangest feel-good stories in sports history: On Wednesday, June 2, 2010, Detroit Tigers' pitcher Armando Galarraga was one out from pitching a rare perfect game. Cleveland Indians' batter Jason Donald hit a ground ball to the right side of the infield. First baseman Miguel Cabrera moved toward second base to field the ball. Galarraga ran from the pitcher's mound to cover first base. Cabrera's throw to Galarraga beat Donald to the bag by about three-quarters of a step--but Jim Joyce, a highly regarded 22-year MLB veteran umpire, incorrectly ruled Donald safe. Galarraga retired the next Indians' hitter for a 3-0 shutout win, but Joyce came under immediate fire for missing the call that cost Galarraga a perfect game. Death threats were sent to his family members in Oregon. MLB Security provided extra protection to Joyce and his umpiring crew. However, Joyce did a remarkable thing: he publicly and candidly acknowledged his error and tearfully apologized to Galarraga in the umpires' room. Galarraga handled the situation incredibly well, telling Joyce that "we're all human." The next afternoon, Joyce was working home plate. Tigers' manager Jim Leyland sent Galarraga to the plate to present the lineup card to a teary-eyed Joyce (see photo). The crowd loudly cheered both Joyce and Galarraga. The dynamics of the situation completely changed: Joyce was then widely hailed as a hero for owning up to his mistake. He received hundreds of letters and emails of support from people from all walks of life. When Joyce's umpiring crew arrived in Philadelphia for their next series, they were applauded at the airport.
Tags: umpire  baseball  Jim  Joyce  mistake 
Added: 8th October 2012
Views: 1343
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Posted By: Lava1964
George Davis - Vanishing Baseball Superstar George Stacey Davis was one of the finest shortstops in Major League Baseball history. He enjoyed a 20-year MLB career from 1890 through 1909. Blessed with a strong arm and an excellent batting eye, Davis was a perennial star for the New York Giants during the late 19th and early 20th century. A switch-hitter, Davis compiled 2,688 career hits and 615 stolen bases. He still holds the Giants' club record for the longest hitting streak (36 games). So valuable was Davis to the Giants that he became one of the controversial figures in the war between the National and American Leagues when he jumped to the Chicago White Stockings of the AL in 1902. Once Davis' playing career ended, he coached Amherst College's baseball team, managed a bowling alley, and sold automobiles for a time. Then he vanished. For decades many noteworthy baseball historians rated Davis as the best player not in the Hall of Fame--and no one seemed to know what had happened to him. In 1968, Lee Allen, the historian at the National Baseball Hall of Fame, wrote an article for The Sporting News in which he asked for any information about Davis' later years and death. A woman claiming to be Davis' niece replied. She put Allen in touch with Davis' estranged sister who suggested Allen should check the records of state hospitals in Pennsylvania. Allen eventually found Davis' death certificate. He had died in a Philadelphia mental institution in 1940 at the age of 70. He had lived there for six years, suffering from the effects of syphilis. Records showed his wife paid $41 to have him quickly interred in a pauper's grave. In 1998 Davis was posthumously inducted into the Hall of Fame by the Veterans' Committee. For the only time in the Hall of Fame's history, no living relative could be found to accept a deceased inductee's plaque at the induction ceremony, although 50 fans from Davis' hometown of Cohoes, NY were present. The purchase of a handsome headstone for Davis' previously unmarked grave was financed by the Society for American Baseball Research shortly after Davis was enshrined in Cooperstown.
Tags: baseball  George  Davis  vanished  syphilis  Hall  of  Fame 
Added: 31st December 2015
Views: 1127
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Posted By: Lava1964
Major Harris Passes at age 65 Major Harris, a former member of the ‘‘Philadelphia sound’’ soul group the Delfonics and singer of the 1975 hit ‘‘Love Won’t Let Me Wait,’’ has died in Richmond. He was 65. His sister, Catherine Thomas, told The Associated Press that Harris passed away Friday morning from congestive heart and lung failure after being rushed to a hospital. The Richmond native was born Feb. 9, 1947, and grew up in a musical family. His father was a guitarist and his mother led the church choir, Thomas said.
Tags: Delfonics  Major  Harris  Philadelphia  sound  Love  Won’t  Let  Me  Wait  congestive  heart  and  lung  failure       
Added: 9th November 2012
Views: 1705
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Posted By: Music Maiden

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