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Bananadine Hoax 1967 Bananadine is a fictional psychoactive substance which is supposedly extracted from banana peels. A hoax recipe for its extraction from banana peels was originally published in the Berkeley Barb in March 1967. It became more widely known when William Powell, believing it to be true, reproduced the method in The Anarchist Cookbook in 1970. The original hoax was designed to raise questions about the ethics of making psychoactive drugs illegal and prosecuting those who took them: 'What if the common banana contained psychoactive properties, how would the government react?" One book of one-liner joke comics, published in 1971, contained a comic in which a teen is secretly handing bunches of bananas to a zoo gorilla at night, uttering the line, 'Just throw the skins back, man!' Researchers at New York University have found that banana peel contains no intoxicating chemicals, and that smoking it produces only a placebo effect. Over the years, there has been considerable speculation regarding the psychoactive properties of banana skins. Donovan's hit single Mellow Yellow was released a few months prior to the Berkeley Barb article, and in the popular culture of the era, the song was assumed to be about smoking banana peels. Shortly after the 'Berkeley Barb' and the song, bananadine was featured in the New York Times.
Tags: hoax  bananadine  narcotics  bananas 
Added: 17th July 2011
Views: 2011
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Posted By: Lava1964
You Bet Your Life - Bill Cosby Remake One of the most enduring game shows of all time was the original You Bet Your Life. It was hosted by Groucho Marx first on radio in 1947 and continued well into the television era until 1961. The quiz game was clearly secondary to the superbly ad-libbed interviews Marx had with the contestants. A new version of You Bet Your Life, hosted by Bill Cosby, aired from September 7, 1992 to June 4, 1993 in syndication. Cosby was joined on this show by a female announcer and sidekick, Robbi Chong; she was referred to as "Renfield." Organist Shirley Scott contributed the jazzy theme music. The program was taped in Philadelphia. Three couples competed, each couple playing the game individually. After the couple was introduced, they spent time chatting with Cosby. When the interview was done, the game began. Each couple was staked with $750 and were then asked three questions within a category presented at the start of the game. Before each question, the couple made a wager, which would be added to their winnings if they were correct or subtracted if they were incorrect. The secret word in this version, worth $500, was represented by a blackbird wearing a sweatshirt from Temple University, Cosby's alma mater. The couple with the most money played for an additional $10,000. Although Cosby was renowned for ad-libbing funny exchanges with audience members as part of his stand-up comedy routines, he was no Groucho Marx. (Who, besides Groucho, was?) Low ratings prompted the cancellation of the series after just one season.
Tags: remake  You  Bet  Your  Life  Bill  Cosby  syndicated 
Added: 21st August 2011
Views: 1672
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Posted By: Lava1964
Make A Wish Does anyone remember a kids' show called Make A Wish? It aired on ABC from 1971 to 1976. Produced by ABC News, it was hosted by musician Tom Chapin and created and produced by Lester Cooper. It replaced Discovery, a similar series for children also produced by ABC News. The series, originally broadcast on Saturday mornings but later moved to Sunday mornings, focused on a particular theme. One episode, for instance, would be about snakes; another about motorcycles. Chapin would introduce the topic in much the same manner: "I think a snake is what I'll be. Imagine all the possibilities." After that there would be a sort of free association featuring stock footage, animation, and Chapin's music and voiceover commentary. The series won a Peabody Award for Best Children's Series in 1971. The music performed on the show was written by Tom's brother, Harry Chapin. The shows relied heavily on stock footage that was cleverly edited and seemed to make sense with the running narrative of words and music. TV critics loved it. Apparently, because of licensing nightmares with the numerous owners of the stock footage and music, Make A Wish won't be available on DVD anytime soon.
Tags: Tom  Chapin  Make  A  Wish  educational  television 
Added: 8th September 2011
Views: 1889
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Posted By: Lava1964
Pete The Pup One of the most recognizable movie or TV pets was Pete The Pup--the dog from the Our Gang/Little Rascals series. Pete's father, Pal The Wonder Dog, was the original Our Gang dog. Pal had a nearly natural complete ring around its left eye. Makeup artist Max Factor simply completed the circle. Pal unfortunately died of accidental poisoning in 1930. Pete, one of Pal's offspring, assumed the role of the Our Gang dog--complete with a fake ring around its eye. Although more than one dog was used until the series ended in 1944, Pete The Pup had the longest career. Pete died at the ripe old age of 16 in 1946.
Tags: dog  Pete  The  Pup  Our  Gang 
Added: 10th September 2011
Views: 1861
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Posted By: Lava1964
The 33-Inning Baseball Game - 1981 The longest game in pro baseball history occurred at McCoy Stadium in 1981 between the home Pawtucket (RI) Red Sox and visiting Rochester (NY) Red Wings of the AAA International League. It lasted a mind-boggling 33 innings. The game began on Saturday, April 18 and lasted 32 innings before being stopped. Play resumed on June 23. Only one additional inning was required as Pawtucket won 3-2 in the bottom of the 33rd inning. The game included future Hall-of-Famers Wade Boggs and Cal Ripken Jr. and 23 others who would eventually advance to MLB. Ominously the start of the game was delayed 30 minutes while a bank of lights was repaired. The game was tied 1-1 after nine innings. It remained knotted for the next 11 innings due to strong performances by both bullpens. In the top of the 21st inning, Red Wings' catcher Dave Huppert doubled, driving in a run giving Rochester a 2-1 lead. In the bottom of the inning, Pawtucket's Wade Boggs hit a double to score Dave Koza and tie the game 2-2. According to league rules, a curfew was supposed to take effect at 1 AM. However, plate umpire Dennis Cregg had an out-of-date rule book; it was missing that provision. Thus the game continued for 11 more scoreless innings. At 2 AM Pawtucket reliever Luis Aponte, who had pitched the seventh through tenth innings, received permission to go home. When Aponte got home at 3 AM, his wife Xiomara angrily asked, "Where have you been?" The pitcher responded, "At the ballpark." His wife snapped, "Like hell you have!" Because news of the game didn't appear in most newspapers until Monday, Aponte spent two nights on the couch. At the start of the 30th inning, the game became the longest in professional history, surpassing a 29-inning game in the Florida State League on June 14, 1966. As the game dragged on, food supplies ran out in the clubhouse and players took drastic measures to keep warm in the April chill. This included burning the benches in the bullpens and the broken bats in the dugouts. Meanwhile, Pawtucket general manager Mike Tamburro was attempting to reach IL president Harold Cooper so he could intervene. Cooper was eventually reached. Horrified, he ordered the game suspended after the completion of the current inning. At 4:09 AM, at the end of the 32nd inning, the game was stopped and would be resumed at a later date. At this point, there were just 19 fans left in the ballpark from the original 1,740. (One was the nephew of umpire Cregg. He had fallen asleep.) Each was given a lifetime pass to McCoy Stadium by Pawtucket owner Ben Mondor. As the players left the stadium they encountered people on their way to sunrise church services for Easter Sunday. Play resumed on June 23 when the Red Wings next returned to Pawtucket. On hand for the resumption was a sellout crowd of 5,746 fans, four television networks, and 140 members of the press from around the world. The game required just one inning and 18 minutes to finish. Pawtucket's first three batters singled. Dave Koza's drove home Marty Barrett. This photo shows on-deck hitter Wade Boggs congratulating Barrett as he touches the plate. The game had lasted a combined 8 hours and 25 minutes. A total of 882 pitches had been thrown.
Tags: minor  league  baseball  marathon  33  innings 
Added: 12th September 2011
Views: 2471
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Posted By: Lava1964
These Are The Days - Cartoon Series Here's A Saturday morning cartoon show that almost no one remembers: These Are The Days. It ran on ABC from September 7, 1974 to September 5, 1976. These Are the Days was an animated television series from Hanna-Barbera. The series, although critically acclaimed, only lasted 16 total episodes. The show originally aired on Saturday mornings but was switched to Sundays midway through 1975. The second season was almost entirely comprised of reruns. The show was set at the turn of the 20th century in an American town called Elmsville. It portrayed the everyday lives of the Day family--which consisted of a widow and her three children, along with her father (the kids' grandpa) who was a skilled inventor. Each episode featured the various family members and their interactions with friends and neighbors, usually ending with a lesson learned. It was designed to capitalize on the popularity of the nostalgia and rustic family lifestyle of The Waltons, but it failed to catch on with most youngsters. Frank Cady (Sam Drucker from Green Acres and Petticoat Junction) provided grandfather Homer Day's voice. June Lockhart was the voice of Martha Day, the mother.
Tags: These  Are  The  Days  cartoon  nostalgia 
Added: 14th September 2011
Views: 4164
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Posted By: Lava1964
Dr Joyce Brothers Wins Game Show Jackpot Dr. Joyce Brothers is known for being a television personality, psychologist and newspaper columnist. However, she first gained national fame in late 1955 by winning the jackpot on The $64,000 Question--a quiz program on which she appeared as a boxing expert. Originally she had not planned to choose boxing as her topic. However, the show's sponsors thought it would be an attention-grabbing gimmick to have a female answer boxing questions, so she agreed. A voracious reader, Brothers studied every reference book about boxing that she could find; she would later tell reporters that her good memory allowed her to accrue a wealth of information about the sweet science--so much so that she had no difficulty with even the toughest questions. When the TV quiz show scandals broke in 1959, Brothers insisted that she had never cheated, nor had she ever been given any answers to questions in advance. Subsequent investigations verified that she had indeed won her jackpot honestly. (No contestant on The $64,000 Question was ever proven to have cheated.) Brothers' success on The $64,000 Question earned her a chance to be the color commentator for CBS during a middleweight title match between Carmen Basilio and Sugar Ray Robinson. She thus became the first woman ever to be a boxing announcer.
Tags: Dr  Joyce  Brothers  boxing  game  show 
Added: 22nd September 2011
Views: 2192
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Posted By: Lava1964
Proctor and Gamble Logo Controversy Proctor & Gamble's former logo originated in 1851 as a crude cross that barge workers on the Ohio River painted on cases of P&G star candles to identify them. P&G later altered this symbol into a trademark (shown below) featuring a man in the moon overlooking 13 stars. It was said to commemorate the original 13 American colonies. Nobody seemed bothered by it for more than a century. In the mid-1980s, though, the company received unwanted media publicity when wild rumors spread that the moon-and-stars logo was a satanic symbol. The odd accusation was based on a particular passage in the Bible, specifically Revelation 12:1, which states: "And there appeared a great wonder in heaven; a woman clothed with the sun, and the moon under her feet, and upon her head a crown of 12 stars." P&G's logo consisted of a man's face on the moon surrounded by 13 stars, and some claimed that the logo was a mockery of the heavenly symbol alluded to in the aforementioned verse, thus construing the logo to be satanic. Where the flowing beard meets the surrounding circle, three curls were said to be a mirror image of the number 666, or the reflected number of the beast. At the top and bottom, the hair curls in on itself, and was said to be the two horns like those of a ram that represented the false prophet. These interpretations were strongly denied by company officials, and no evidence linking P&G to the Church of Satan or any other occult organization has ever been presented. The company unsuccessfully sued Amway from 1995 to 2003 over rumors forwarded through a company voicemail system in 1995. In 2007 P&G successfully sued individual Amway distributors for reviving and propagating the false rumors. Tired of the controversy, the moon-and-stars logo was discontinued by P&G in 1985.
Tags: controversy  Proctor  and  Gamble  logo  santanism 
Added: 30th September 2011
Views: 12469
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Posted By: Lava1964
Andrea True- Singer of Disco Hit Dies at 68 Andrea True, the disco star who had such hits as 'More More More' and 'What's Your Name, What's Your Number,' died Nov. 7 in a Kingston, N.Y. hospital, the Daily Freeman reports. True, born Andrea Marie Truden, originally planned to become an actress in New York but became a porn star in films such as Deep Throat Part II and Lady on the Couch. True's career in music began when she went to Jamaica to film a commercial in 1975 but was not allowed to leave the country with the money she had earned. Instead of handing over her money, she recorded an early version of her eventual hit "More, More, More" and left Jamaica with the master tape. The song was remixed and released in 1976, becoming one of the iconic songs of the disco era. Read more: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/andrea-true-dead-at-68-20111123#ixzz1gMVzOEHC
Tags: Andrea  True,  More  more  more,  disco,  porn  star 
Added: 12th December 2011
Views: 1591
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Posted By: Music Maiden
Howdy Doody - Final episode Clip from the final episode including the original NBC peacock.
Tags: Howdy  Doody  TV  1950 
Added: 24th December 2011
Views: 11514
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Posted By: KrazyKasper

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