Welcome Guest! YouRememberThat.com is 100% FREE & fast to join! Upload, comment, create your own profile and more!



Check our brand new site TheRetroSite , although YouRememberThat will remain for quite some time we expect this new site to be our new home. Click over and create your account on the new mobile friendly and flexible site today!
Search
Search:
 
 Dean Martin Sings his Old Classic 'That's Amore' became a major hit for Dean in 1953. And it was introduced to a whole new generation when Martin's original version was played as the opening theme song for the award-winning 1987 movie, 'Moonstruck', starring Cher, Nicholas Cage, Olympia Dukakis and Vincent Gardenia.
Tags: dean  martin  thats  amore 
Added: 23rd January 2008
Views: 2434
Rating:
Posted By: Sophia
Steel Magnolias One of the highlights of this great film! (the language isn't so bad really) It just adds alot to Shirley MacLaines character.
Tags: Sally  Field  Dolly  Parton  Shirley  MacLaine  Olympia  Dukakis  Julia  Roberts 
Added: 24th February 2008
Views: 1458
Rating:
Posted By: Naomi
Washington State Include Festivus In Their Displays OLYMPIA, Wash. - State officials, besieged by requests for more seasonal displays at the state Capitol, have approved several more - including a "Festivus" display honoring a faux holiday popularized by TV comedian Jerry Seinfeld. http://www.komonews.com/news/local/35616504.html
Tags: Washington  State  Include  Festivus  In  Their  Displays 
Added: 11th December 2008
Views: 1101
Rating:
Posted By: BigBoy Bob
NBA Shot Clock Invented 1954 It was the innovation that saved professional basketball: The 24-second shot clock. Coach Howard Hobson came up with with the idea of a shot clock, but it was first used in 1954 in Syracuse, New York. There Danny Biasone, the owner of the National Basketball Association's Syracuse Nationals, experimented with a 24-second version during a scrimmage game. He then convinced the NBA to adopt it. In the pre-shot clock days, the NBA had problems attracting fans and television coverage. This was largely due to the stalling tactics used by teams once they took the lead. Without the shot clock, teams could pass the ball in the front court endlessly without penalty. If the team in the lead chose to stall, the trailing team was forced to commit fouls to get the ball back following the free throw. Low-scoring, boring games with many fouls were common. The most extreme case occurred on November 22, 1950, when the Fort Wayne Pistons defeated the Minneapolis Lakers 19-18. A few weeks later, the Rochester Royals and Indianapolis Olympians played a soporific six-overtime game with only one shot in each overtime. The NBA tried several rule changes in the early 1950s to speed up the game and reduce fouls before eventually adopting Biasone's idea. How did Biasone arrive at the strange figure of 24 seconds? According to Biasone, 'I looked at the box scores from games I enjoyed, games where they didn't screw around and stall. I noticed each team took about 60 shots. That meant 120 shots per game. So I took 48 minutes--2,880 seconds--and divided that by 120 shots. The result was 24 seconds per shot.' When the shot clock first came into vogue, it made players so nervous that it hardly came into play; players were generally taking fewer than 20 seconds to shoot. According to Syracuse player Dolph Schayes, 'We thought we had to take quick shots. But as time went on, we saw the inherent genius in Danny's 24 seconds. You could work the ball around for a good shot.'
Tags: NBA  shot  clock 
Added: 15th November 2009
Views: 3847
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Lolita Controversy Vladimir Nabokov's novel Lolita deals with a middle-aged writer's sexual infatuation with a 12-year-old girl. Due to its shocking and risque subject matter, Nabokov was unable to find an American publisher for Lolita after finishing his manuscript in 1953. After four refusals, he finally resorted to Olympia Press in Paris in September 1955. (The photo below shows a copy of a first edition.) Although the first printing of 5,000 copies sold out quickly, there were no substantial reviews. However, at the end of 1955, Graham Greene, in an interview with the Times of London, called Lolita one of the best novels of 1955. This statement provoked a response from London's Sunday Express, whose editor called it 'the filthiest book I have ever read' and 'sheer unrestrained pornography.' British Customs officers were then instructed by a panicked Home Office to seize all copies entering the United Kingdom. In December 1956, the French followed suit and the Minister of the Interior banned Lolita. (The ban lasted for two years.) Its eventual British publication by Weidenfeld and Nicolson caused a scandal that contributed to the end of the political career of one of the publishers, Nigel Nicolson. In contrast, American officials were initially nervous, but the first American edition was issued without problems by G.P. Putnam's Sons in 1958, and was a bestseller--the first book since Gone with the Wind to sell 100,000 copies in the first three weeks of publication. Today Lolita is widely considered to be one of the finest novels of the 20th century. In 1998, it was named the fourth greatest English language novel of the 20th century by the Modern Library.
Tags: fiction  Lolita  publishing  controversy 
Added: 8th July 2010
Views: 3369
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Olympian Anthony Hembrick Misses Bus During the mid-1980s, Detroit's Anthony Hembrick, a member of the U.S. Army, was a three-time American amateur middleweight boxing champion. He was perceived to be a medal hopeful when he arrived at the 1988 Seoul Olympics. However, Hembrick never got the chance to show his stuff because he never got the opportunity to fight there. Hembrick and his coach, Ken Adams, were misinformed about the time of Hembrick's first-round match and missed catching a bus from the Olympic Village that would have gotten him to the boxing venue in ample time. By the time Hembrick and Adams arrived at Chamshil Students' Gymnasium, Hembrick had been disqualified and the match was awarded to South Korean Ha Jong-Ho. The 1988 Olympic boxing tournament was replete with odd incidents and controversies. Anti-American sentiment among the host South Koreans was widespread. Some conspiracy-minded people believe Hembrick was deliberately misled about the time of his match so the South Korean boxer would win by walkover. Hembrick later embarked on a pro boxing career, usually at light heavyweight, that was largely disappointing. He was often introduced before his bouts as "the man who missed the bus."
Tags: Anthony  Hembrick  Olympic  boxing  disqualified 
Added: 2nd November 2011
Views: 2256
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Leo Randolph - Forgotten Olympian The 1976 American Olympic boxing team won five gold medals, one silver, and one bronze. Four of the gold medallists eventually won professional world titles. Though largely forgotten today, Leo Randolph was one of them. Randolph, a resident of Tacoma, WA, won the flyweight division at the Montreal Olympics at age 18. (In the gold-medal match against Cuba's Ramon Duvalon, many boxing fans thought Randolph was the recipient of a generous decision.) Randolph waited nearly two years before turning professional. In the interim he finished high school and worked at a Boeing aircraft factory. Randolph's early pro opponents, in most cases, left a lot to be desired as there are few quality pro boxers in the lightest weight categories in North America. Nevertheless, Randolph beat Colombia's Ricardo Cardona for the WBA junior featherweight title on May 4, 1980 with a 15th-round knockout. However, in his first defense of his title just three months later, Randolph was totally outclassed by Sergio Palma of Argentina. The challenger battered Randolph and won the title with a sixth-round technical knockout. Saying his heart was no longer in boxing, Randolph collected his $72,000 purse and promptly retired after the bout at age 22, compiling a pro record of 17-2. In a 1996 "Where Are They Now?" feature in Sports Illustrated, Randolph was happily employed as a bus driver for Pierce Transit in the Pacific northwest.
Tags: boxing  Leo  Randolph  Olympics 
Added: 27th December 2012
Views: 1328
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Bob Baun - Broken Leg Goal A sports classic: It's April 23, 1964; Game #6 of the 1964 Stanley Cup finals. The Detroit Red Wings lead the Toronto Maple Leafs three games to two and are looking to clinch the Cup at the Detroit Olympia. During the third period, Toronto defenceman Bobby Baun crumples to the ice and has to be taken to the Leafs' dressing room on a stretcher. He's done for the night, right? Nope! Believing he only has a pinched nerve in his leg, Baun returns in time for the overtime period--and scores the winning goal! A post-game medical examination reveals that Baun had broken his leg. (Two nights later, Baun plays in the deciding seventh game too and leads Toronto to a 4-0 win and the Stanley Cup.)
Tags: Bob  Baun  broken  leg  Stanley  Cup  hockey  NHL 
Added: 8th June 2013
Views: 1463
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Avery Brundage Avery Brundage was the only American ever to become president of the International Olympic Committee--a position he held from 1952 to 1972. He was also the most controversial IOC head. Brundage had competed at the 1912 Stockholm Olympics in the decathlon and pentathlon. He later acquired significant wealth from his contruction company combined with some shrewd investments. His vast fortune skewed his views of amateurism. Since he was independently wealthy, he could not see why every other amateur athlete could not be self-sufficient too. As a result, Brundage believed the only true athletes were amateurs. He denounced pro athletes as entertainers. Brundage rose to become head of the United States Olympic Committee by 1936. That year he controversially allowed the American team to compete in the Berlin Olympics despite heavy public pressure to boycott the Nazi-themed Games. He personally disqualified one notable female American athlete, swimmer Eleanor Holm, for allegedly engaging in immoral behavior on the team's ocean voyage to Hamburg. (Years later Holm claimed she had rebuffed the married Brundage's advances and he suspended her out of spite.) After the 1936 Games, Brundage openly praised Nazi Germany's economic resurgence and newfound national pride. By 1952 he became head of the IOC and a staunch defender of pure amateur sports, saying that the ideal Olympian should be a Renaissance person with many interests--not just the financial benefits of being a pro athlete. Critics labelled him "Slavery Avery." Despite being anti-communist, Brundage was impressed by the Soviet Union's national physical fitness programs and was instrumental in getting the USSR into the Olympic movement. Brundage was still at the helm of the IOC at age 85 in 1972 when a terrorist attack killed 11 Israeli team members. Brundage called for a day of mourning and then insisted the Games continue-- a decision still controversial today. In one of his final public speeches as IOC head, Brundage favored abolishing the Winter Olympics because of their growing commercialization. He died in 1975.
Tags: Avery  Brundage  IOC 
Added: 5th February 2013
Views: 1579
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Wilma Rudolph on to Tell The Truth Triple gold medallist Wilma Rudolph appears on To Tell The Truth a few months after her athletic triumphs at the 1960 Rome Olympics. It's amazing to consider how anonymous even the greatest Olympians were in the days before the Olympic Games were widely televised.
Tags: Wilma  Rudolph  atheltics  To  Tell  The  Truth 
Added: 21st March 2013
Views: 1102
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

Pages: [1] 2 of 2 | Random