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Charley Ross Abduction Case - 1874 The first prominent child abduction in American history was the Charley Ross case. On July 1, 1874, four-year-old Charley Ross was playing with his five-year-old brother Walter in the front yard of their home in the affluent Germantown section of Philadelphia. Two men pulled up in a horse-drawn carriage. They offered the two brothers candy and fireworks if they would take a ride into town with them. The naive youngsters agreed. After a short ride, the carriage stopped in front of a store. Walter was given a quarter to buy fireworks. When he came out of the store, the carriage was gone. A sobbing Walter was found by a policeman. Walter explained what had happened. He described one of the men as having "a monkey nose." Not long afterward, ransom demands were mailed to Charley's father, Christian Ross, from various post offices in and around Philadelphia. The notes demanded the enormous sum of $20,000 for the boy's safe return. Christian was heavily in debt following the 1873 stock market crash and could not afford to play the ransom. The Pinkerton Detective Agency circulated thousands of handbills with an artist's drawing of Charley's face which made the case national news. Attempts to meet with the kidnappers on several occasions failed when the abductors never showed up. There were no significant developments in the case until December 1874 when two career criminals were shot while attempting to burglarize a judge's home in Long Island. One intruder, Bill Mosher, died instantly. The other, Joe Douglas, was mortally wounded. Before he died, Douglas confessed that he and Mosher had kidnapped Charley Ross in July. Contradictory statements were given as to whether the boy was still alive. Walter was taken to Long Island to identify the dead twosome. He agreed they were the men who had taken him for the carriage ride in July. Mosher was easily identified because of his deformed "monkey nose." The Ross family resolutely continued to pursue leads for Charley well into the 1930s. Hundreds of would-be Charley Rosses were investigated. None could be proven as legitimate. It is believed the admonition, "Don't take candy from strangers" was inspired by the Charley Ross kidnapping.
Tags: Charley  Ross  kidnapping  child  abduction 
Added: 17th July 2014
Views: 2290
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Posted By: Lava1964
Howard Cosell-Alvin Garrett Incident Love him or hate him, Howard Cosell was pretty much the personification of ABC's Monday Night Football from its inception in 1970 through the 1983 season. During the first Monday night game of the 1983 NFL season between the Washington Redskins and the Dallas Cowboys, Howard Cosell made the following comment about diminutive Washington wide receiver Alvin Garrett: "That little monkey sure gets loose, doesn't he?" Immediately Cosell came under fire from a black minister, the Reverend Joseph Lowery of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Lowery called the remark racist and demanded Cosell apologize or be fired. Cosell was stunned by the allegation. He said the term 'little monkey' was a term of endearment--which he often used to describe his own grandchildren. Indeed, anyone who fairly examined Cosell's body of work knew he had supported black athletes time and time again in truly divisive racial disputes. Jesse Jackson and Muhammad Ali both publicly supported Cosell. Garrett himself said he knew that Cosell meant no harm. Someone even found a clip from a preseason football telecast from 1972 in which Cosell referred to Mike Adamle--a small Caucasian player--as "a little monkey." Nevertheless, Cosell's tenure with Monday night football ended without much fanfare at the end of the 1983 season. He covered the boxing tournament at the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics and not much else afterward. When Cosell was not assigned to work ABC's coverage of the 1985 World Series, it was obvious that ABC had quietly put the aging Cosell--its iconic broadcaster--out to pasture.
Tags: Howard  Cosell  Alvin  Garrett  racism  incident 
Added: 11th July 2015
Views: 1360
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Posted By: Lava1964
Jiffy Pop Pop Corn Tags: Jiffy  Pop  Pop  Corn  Monkey  ape  food  corn  food  snack  60s 
Added: 2nd August 2015
Views: 1358
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Posted By: Freckles
Chico Marx Plays the Piano From the 1931 Marx Brothers' comedy Monkey Business, Chico Marx tickles the ivories in his own stylish way. The tune he is playing is titled Pizzicato Polka.
Tags: Chico  Marx  piano  Pizzicato  Polka  Monkey  Business 
Added: 20th September 2015
Views: 1082
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

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