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Swinging London - 60s Fashion Tags: 60's    Fashion    Mary    Quant    PVC    Chelsea    London    PaperDress     
Added: 19th May 2009
Views: 1427
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Posted By: pfc
Henry Cooper Decks Cassius Clay The most critical moment in the boxing career of Cassius Clay (later Muhammad Ali) occurred in this June 18, 1963 fight at London's Wembley stadium versus lightly regarded British champion Henry Cooper. A Clay victory would pretty much assure him of a title fight versus Sonny Liston. But wait! Watch Clay get decked by a Cooper left hook at the end of round four. Round five was delayed slightly when a tear in one of Clay's gloves was brought to the attention of referee Tommy Little. Some people believe the extra few seconds between rounds--and it was only a slight delay despite the persistent myth that claims round five was delayed anywhere from three to ten minutes--allowed the dazed Clay precious extra time to recover his senses.
Tags: Cassius  Clay  Henry  Cooper  boxing 
Added: 21st July 2009
Views: 2946
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Posted By: Lava1964
Jack The Ripper Poster Jack the Ripper is the best-known name given to an unidentified serial killer who was active in the largely impoverished areas in and around the Whitechapel district of London in 1888.
Tags: Jack  The  Ripper  Poster   
Added: 4th April 2014
Views: 1500
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Posted By: Cathy
Edward R Murrow Edward R. Murrow was arguably the most important and influential journalist in American history. His first-person radio reports from hot-spot European locales in the late 1930s gave his CBS listeners a sense of how the world was moving towards war. Murrow is most renowned for his compelling radio broadcasts from London during the Blitz. They always began, 'This...is London.' Murrow's distinguished career continued into the television era with See It Now and various specials. He famously took on Senator Joseph McCarthy when a friend, Laurence Duggan, committed suicide after McCarthy accused him of being a communist spy. (An examination of decrypted Soviet archives years later proved McCarthy was correct!) One ominous episode of See It Now examined the dangers of cigarettes--while the chain-smoking Murrow puffed away on his indispensible Camels. Murrow said he couldn't possibly go more than 30 minutes without a cigarette. He died in 1965, two days after his 57th birthday, of lung cancer. He was featured on a 29-cent stamp in 1994. The original stamp design showed him with a cigarette in his hand. It was rejected.
Tags: Edward  R  Murrow  journalist 
Added: 30th October 2009
Views: 2102
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Posted By: Lava1964
Olympic Lacrosse Lacrosse was an official medal sport in two Summer Olympics: 1904 and 1908. Canada won both 'tournaments' (if you can call them that). In 1904 at St. Louis there were only three teams competing. Two of them were Canadian. In 1908, the tourney in London consisted of one game between Canada and Great Britain. It was played more than three months after the other Olympic events had concluded! This photograph is from that game, won by Canada 14-10.
Tags: Olympic  lacrosse 
Added: 29th May 2010
Views: 1108
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Posted By: Lava1964
Lolita Controversy Vladimir Nabokov's novel Lolita deals with a middle-aged writer's sexual infatuation with a 12-year-old girl. Due to its shocking and risque subject matter, Nabokov was unable to find an American publisher for Lolita after finishing his manuscript in 1953. After four refusals, he finally resorted to Olympia Press in Paris in September 1955. (The photo below shows a copy of a first edition.) Although the first printing of 5,000 copies sold out quickly, there were no substantial reviews. However, at the end of 1955, Graham Greene, in an interview with the Times of London, called Lolita one of the best novels of 1955. This statement provoked a response from London's Sunday Express, whose editor called it 'the filthiest book I have ever read' and 'sheer unrestrained pornography.' British Customs officers were then instructed by a panicked Home Office to seize all copies entering the United Kingdom. In December 1956, the French followed suit and the Minister of the Interior banned Lolita. (The ban lasted for two years.) Its eventual British publication by Weidenfeld and Nicolson caused a scandal that contributed to the end of the political career of one of the publishers, Nigel Nicolson. In contrast, American officials were initially nervous, but the first American edition was issued without problems by G.P. Putnam's Sons in 1958, and was a bestseller--the first book since Gone with the Wind to sell 100,000 copies in the first three weeks of publication. Today Lolita is widely considered to be one of the finest novels of the 20th century. In 1998, it was named the fourth greatest English language novel of the 20th century by the Modern Library.
Tags: fiction  Lolita  publishing  controversy 
Added: 8th July 2010
Views: 3299
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Posted By: Lava1964
Funeral of King Edward VII This is a still photo of the funeral of Great Britain's King Edward VII in London on May 20, 1910. It brought together a remarkable collection of European royalty never before or afterward assembled. Mourning the 'uncle of Europe' was the new British king, Edward's son, George V. In addition, there were eight crowned heads in the procession: the German Emperor, plus the kings of Norway, Greece, Spain, Bulgaria, Denmark, Portugal, and Belgium. There were about 30 European princes among the mourners too--including Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria. His assassination in 1914 was the powder keg that triggered the First World War. Most of the royalty present at Edward's funeral met inglorious ends as many European monarchies crumbled during the war or shortly afterward.
Tags: royalty  funeral  Great  Britain  Edward 
Added: 11th December 2010
Views: 2605
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Posted By: Lava1964
Hedy Lamar - Brains and Beauty Hedy Lamar combined brains and beauty. Her flight to America would make an excellent movie! Hedy was born in Austria in 1916. At age 17 - in the 1933 Czech film Ecstasy - she appeared in a steamy love scene, and swam nude in a 10 minute onscreen sequence. Ecstasy was banned in America for being indecent. At 19, her parents gave her into an arranged marriage with an Austrian arms dealer. She attended hundreds of parties as his trophy wife, mingling many times with Hitler and Mussolini, and lived in the Salzberg castle where The Sound of Music was later filmed. Hedy's husband was a control freak, and she fled him in dramatic fashions. In her first attempt, with her husband chasing her, she hid in a brothel. In desperation, with her husband stalking the halls of the brothel, she actually serviced a customer during her attempt to hide. In a later, successful escape, Hedy hired a maid who looked like her. She drugged the maid, donned her uniform, exited by the service entrance, and made her way to London. In some versions of this story, she escaped during a party, taking most of her jewels with her. Hedy later boarded a ship for America, and Louis B. Mayer signed her to a studio contract while en route to America, and still aboard ship. She must have been brilliant. While in America, Hedy co-invented a system of switching frequencies which is still used by the U.S. military to control some missiles. It's principles are also used in wireless internet technology, and in many cellphones. She got the idea while playing piano duets with her co-inventor: composer George Antheil. She would follow Antheil on the piano as he - switching from key to key and rhythm to rhythm - attempted both to throw her off, and to create interesting interplay.
Tags: actress  Hedy  Lamar 
Added: 25th August 2011
Views: 2804
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Posted By: Lava1964
Dog Finds Stolen World Cup Trophy - 1966 In 1966 England hosted the quadrennial World Cup soccer finals. On March 20, a few months before the tournament began, the Jules Rimet Trophy (a.k.a. the World Cup) was stolen while being exhibited at Westminster Central Hall. Interestingly, the culprits ignored a priceless array of rare stamps to steal the far-less-valuable trophy. Police quickly received a 15,000 ransom demand. However, when they arrested the culprit, he turned out to be a hoaxer. The trophy was, however, found just seven days later wrapped in newspaper at the bottom of a suburban garden hedge in South London. The finder was a collie dog named Pickles who sniffed out the World Cup while taking a walk with his owner David Corbett. When England won the trophy, Pickles was invited to the celebration banquet and was allowed to lick his owner's bowl. His owner collected a 6,000 reward. The thief was never caught.
Tags: dog  World  Cup  soccer  Pickles 
Added: 1st September 2011
Views: 1970
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Posted By: Lava1964
Last Female WWI veteran dies Florence Patterson Green never saw the front line. Her war was spent serving food, not dodging bullets. But Green, who died on February 4, 2012, aged 110, was the last known surviving veteran of World War I. She was serving with the Women's Royal Air Force as a waitress at an air base in eastern England when the guns fell silent on November 11, 1918. It was not until 2010 that she was officially recognized as a veteran after a researcher found her service record in Britain's National Archives. Green died Saturday at the Briar House Care Home in King's Lynn, eastern England, two weeks before her 111th birthday, the home said. Retired Air Vice-Marshal Peter Dye, director-general of the RAF Museum, said it was fitting that the last survivor of the first global war was someone who had served on the home front. "In a way, that the last veteran should be a lady and someone who served on the home front is something that reminds me that warfare is not confined to the trenches," Dye said. "It reminds us of the Great War, and all warfare since then has been something that involved everyone. It's a collective experience ... Sadly, whether you are in New York, in London, or in Kandahar, warfare touches all of our lives." She was born Florence Beatrice Patterson in London on February 19, 1901, and joined the newly formed Women's Royal Air Force in September 1918 at the age of 17. The service trained women to work as mechanics, drivers and in other jobs to free men for front-line duty. Green went to work as a steward in the officers' mess, first at the Narborough airdrome and then at RAF Marham in eastern England, and was serving there when the war ended. The photo below was taken in February 2010 at a celebration of Florence's 109th birthday.
Tags: Florence  Patterson  Green  WWI  veteran 
Added: 8th February 2012
Views: 1375
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Posted By: Lava1964

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