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I Would Do Anything For Love but i won't do that . . and here's some Meat Loaf TRIVIA: This was Meat Loaf's comeback song. In 1977, his album BAT OUT OF HELL, produced the hits "TWO OUT OF THREE AIN'T BAD," "PARADISE BY THE DASHBOARD LIGHT," and "YOU TOOK THE WORDS RIGHT OUTTA MY MOUTH," all written by piano player Jim Steinman. After a falling out with Steinman and difficulty in his personal life, Meat Loaf released several unsuccessful albums before reuniting with Steinman for Bat Out of Hell II: Back Into Hell, which was considered a sequel to the 1977 album. This has a very similar sound to Meat Loaf's previous hits, and the bombastic, piano-driven style went over well with his old fans as well as a new generation of listeners, helping make this a massive hit...
Tags: Meat  Loaf        Bat  Out  Of  Hell        I  Would  Do  ANYTHING    For  Love  But  I  Won 
Added: 14th December 2007
Views: 1972
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Posted By: Teresa
Meat Loaf   Two Out Of Three Ain t Bad A great slow song of 1977.
Tags: meat  loaf,  two  out  of  three 
Added: 18th February 2008
Views: 1829
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Posted By: rickfmdj
Green Eyed Lady Sugarloaf
Tags: Great  Tune! 
Added: 6th May 2008
Views: 1346
Rating:
Posted By: Marty6697
sugarloaf  dont call us  well call you 1975-This song "Don't Call Us, We'll Call You" is notable because it contained a practical joke at the expense of CBS Records, which had just turned them down for a recording contract. The song includes the sound of a touch-tone telephone number being dialed near the beginning and ending of the song. Those numbers were an unlisted phone number at CBS Records and a public number at the White House respectively. In addition, the recording includes snippets of the guitar riff of The Beatles' "I Feel Fine," Stevie Wonder's "Superstition," and a line of dialogue from Wolfman Jack stating the call sign of a radio station.
Tags: sugarloaf    dont  call  us    well  call  you 
Added: 6th June 2008
Views: 1789
Rating:
Posted By: rickfmdj
Dont Call Us well Call You Sugar Loaf Released in 1974. Made it to #7 on the charts.
Tags: Oldie  but  Goodie 
Added: 29th November 2008
Views: 1346
Rating:
Posted By: Marty6697
Making of Bat Out Of Hell-Meatloaf Tags:         Meatloaf          bat          out          of          hell          classic          ablum          eagle          rock          entertainment          Jim          Steinman          Todd          Rundgren          Ellen          Foley          Karla          De          Vito          Paradise          By          The          Dashboard          Light          You          Took          Words          Right          Out          Of          My          Mouth 
Added: 16th May 2011
Views: 1625
Rating:
Posted By: Cathy
Dorothy Arnold - Missing Socialite One of the most intriguing missing persons cases in American history centers around a 24-year-old New York socialite, Dorothy Arnold, who seemingly vanished into thin air one afternoon in New York City in 1910. Arnold was from a wealthy family, the daughter of the 73-year-old head of a prosperous import company and the niece of a Supreme Court justice. Educated at Bryn Mawr, Dorothy was an aspiring writer. On Monday, December 12, 1910, Dorothy left her New York City home at about 11 a.m. telling her mother she would be shopping for an evening gown for an upcoming event. Dorothy left the house with only the clothes on her back and about $30. Arnold went to a candy store and a bookstore where she bought items using the Arnold family credit. When she left the bookstore, Dorothy encountered Gladys King, a friend. King was the last known person to have seen Dorothy. No one who saw Dorothy on December 12 noticed anything odd about her behavior. She apparently never purchased the dress, so she had either lied to her mother or had been interrupted before she could buy it. On the day of her disappearance, Dorothy was fashionably dressed and was a familiar face in New York City. Therefore, it is unlikely that Dorothy could have ventured far without being noticed. That evening, when Dorothy strangely had not returned home for dinner, the Arnold family began making inquiries among her friends. They were unable to turn up any news of their daughter. Fearing some sort of scandal, Dorothy's family did not call the police right away--which was typical of the era. Anyone calling the Arnold home inquiring about Dorothy was told she was in bed with a headache. Dorothy's parents hired a lawyer who privately tried to find Dorothy for six weeks. His investigation got nowhere, so the police were finally contacted in late January of 1911. By that time, Dorothy's trail had gone hopelessly cold. Newspapers played up the story--especially in New York City. It led to several hoaxes, including two phony ransom notes being sent to the Arnold home and a postcard purportedly sent overseas by Dorothy. These were quickly dismissed as inauthentic. After 75 days, the police closed the case under the assumption that Dorothy was dead. However as late as 1935 the New York City police were still receiving tips about alleged sightings of Dorothy. So what happened to Dorothy? She had been unofficially engaged to a 42-year-old man named George (Junior) Griscom--a situation which displeased her family who considered him to be a loafer. There was absolutely no evidence that she and Junior had a falling out or had run away together. In fact, Junior put out several ads imploring Dorothy to contact him, but to no avail. He eventually moved on with his life. Another theory was that Dorothy was upset that her parents had cruelly mocked her for wanting to become a writer and because two of her stories had recently been rejected by magazines. Thus some people speculate Dorothy committed suicide believing that she was a failure. Still no one had evidence that she was anything but happy on the day she disappeared. Yet another theory is that Dorothy died at an illegal abortion clinic and her body was swiftly incinerated in the building's furnace--which was known to happen in 1910. In 1921, John H. Ayers, who headed New York City's Missing Persons Bureau, curiously told an auditorium filled with high school students that Dorothy's fate had always been known to the police and her family but he did not elaborate any further. When journalists pressed him for more details, he quickly claimed he had been misquoted.
Tags: missing  persons  case  Dorothy  Arnold 
Added: 16th January 2015
Views: 2082
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Posted By: Lava1964

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