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Missing Airplane From 1950 - Northwest Flight 2501 Commercial airliners vanishing are not new. On the night of June 23, 1950, Northwest Orient Airlines flight 2501 departed from New York City en route to its final destination of Seattle with a scheduled stopover in Minneapolis. It never made it to either stop. Sometime around 1:13 a.m. the DC-4 vanished over Lake Michigan near Benton Harbor, MI not long after its captain, Robert Lind, requested permission from air-traffic control to lower its altitude by 1000 meters to avoid stormy conditions. That permission was denied due to heavy air traffic. The airplane should have been spotted on radar near Milwaukee shortly thereafter, but instead it vanished. It was filled to capacity with 55 passengers and a crew of three. Some debris--including small body fragments--washed ashore but the plane itself has never been found, despite sonar-assisted searches and trawlers dragging the lake bottom. Thus no one knows what really happened to it. Researchers in 2008 discovered that the human remains were buried secretly in an unmarked grave without the victims' families being notified. At the time it was the worst airline disaster in American history.
Tags: airplane  aviation  missing  plane  Northwest  2501 
Added: 16th February 2015
Views: 1594
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Posted By: Lava1964
Postmortem Photography It seems a little bit creepy today--well, actually it seems extremely creepy by modern standards--but it was quite common in the late 19th century to photograph your loved ones in lifelike poses after they had died! Photography was generally very expensive in the 19th century. Often families had no photographs of loved ones while they were alive. Accordingly, as part of a funeral ritual, the recently deceased person would be dressed, posed in a very lifelike position--much like the gentleman in this example--and his/her image was preserved for posterity. Frequently they were posed alongside siblings and parents as part of a family portrait. Because of the slow shutter speed of cameras in those days, dead people were actually the best subjects for photographers as they were guaranteed to stay still. Postmortem photography was surprisingly commonplace in Europe and North America (especially of dead children because childhood mortality rates were very high). It remained quite common until photography became cheaper and families were more likely to have photos of their relatives taken while they were still in the land of the living.
Tags: postmortem  photography 
Added: 9th March 2015
Views: 1143
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Posted By: Lava1964
Shirley Temple - On Account of I Love You From one of her earliest feature films, Baby Take A Bow (1934), six-year-old Shirley Temple and co-star James Dunn perform the song-and-dance number On Account of I Love You. (In Shirley's autobiography she said she had a huge crush on Dunn.)
Tags: Shirley  Temple  James  Dunn  On  Account  of  I  Love  You 
Added: 19th March 2015
Views: 1010
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Posted By: Lava1964
1967 Stanley Cup Finals - Game 3 OT The year 1967 was Canada's centennial, so it was somewhat fitting that the two Canadian NHL teams would meet in that year's Stanley Cup final. The 1966-67 NHL season was also the last year of the old six-team league; the following season the league would double in size to 12 clubs. Here are some highlights from the two overtime periods from Game #3 at Maple Leaf Gardens. It seems from another world: NHL players with no helmets, two barefaced goalies, no advertising on the boards or on the ice, and end-to-end excitement in a critical game! Bill Hewitt and Brian McFarlane call the action. The Toronto Maple Leafs would beat the Montreal Canadiens in six games to win the Stanley Cup. Toronto has not even been in the Cup finals in all the years since 1967.
Tags: hockey  NHL  Stanley  Cup  final  game  three  overtime 
Added: 7th May 2015
Views: 1416
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Posted By: Lava1964
Nelson Eddy Sings Stout-Hearted Men From the 1940 movie New Moon, Nelson Eddy rallies a bunch of reluctant revolutionaries by singing Stout-Hearted Men.
Tags: New  Moon  Stout-Hearted  Men  Nelson  Eddy 
Added: 20th July 2015
Views: 2318
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Posted By: Lava1964
Earliest Photo of White House This image from 1846 is the earlier known photograph of the White House. James Polk was the occupant at the time.
Tags: 1846  White  House  photo 
Added: 30th September 2015
Views: 983
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Posted By: Lava1964
Depression-Era Dresses Made from Flour Sacks During the Great Depression flour companies became aware that their sacks were being reused as material by poor families to make dresses for little girls. Accordingly, some companies began putting patterns on their sacks to make the material more visually attractive.
Tags: flour  sack  dress  materials  Depression 
Added: 5th October 2015
Views: 1302
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Posted By: Lava1964
He And She - Failed Sitcom 1967 In the fall of 1967 CBS introduced one of its first urbane, "sophisticated" situation comedies--He & She. It flopped despite having an excellent cast. Real-life husband and wife Richard Benjamin and Paula Prentiss played Dick and Paula Hollister. Dick was a cartoonist; Paula worked for Travelers' Aid in New York City. Dick's creation of Jetman was turned into a TV series with Jack Cassidy playing the role. Even though it had two blockbuster hits (The Beverly Hillbillies and Green Acres) preceding it in CBS' Wednesday night lineup, viewers generally did not stick around for He & She. Benjamin believed that the two popular lead-in shows actually served to hurt He & She because its urban comedy was a world apart from that of the rural sitcoms. Twenty-six episodes were made in the lone season it aired. Here is the opening montage.
Tags: He  and  She  CBS  sitcom  flop 
Added: 6th November 2015
Views: 1124
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Posted By: Lava1964
SS Eastland Disaster - 1915 On Saturday, July 24, 1915 the S.S. Eastland, a Chicago-based passenger steamer ship, welcomed nearly 2,600 people aboard. Most were employees of the Western Electric Company's Hawthorne Works in Cicero, IL and their families. The Eastland was docked at a pier in the Chicago River. Passengers began boarding at 6:30 a.m. Their destination was Michigan City, IN--a three-hour trip across Lake Michigan for a day of fun and recreation at an enormous company picnic. The last passengers boarded the Eastland at about 7:10 a.m. At 7:28 a.m., still tied to the dock, the Eastland took on water, lurched dramatically to its port side (away from the dock) where most of the passengers were standing, and quickly capsized. About one-third of the passengers--844 people--and four crew members were trapped within the doomed ship and were either crushed to death or drowned in 20 feet of water. How did the catastrophe happen? First, the ship was overloaded with both passengers and the weight of additional lifeboats mandated by new maritime safety laws. In previous trips that summer, the Eastland had carried 1,100 passengers at most. Second, renovations and additions to the Eastland has raised its height and dangerously shifted the ship's center of gravity. Third, the Eastland's ballast tanks were initially empty. If they had been filled before the passengers boarded, they could have provided more stable balance for the Eastland. Twenty-two entire families perished in the disaster. One notable person bought a ticket for the Eastland. Fortunately for him, he arrived at the dock too late to board the ship. It was a 20-year-old Western Electric employee George Halas. He had intended to play in the baseball game at the company picnic. Halas, after playing 24 games for the New York Yankees in 1919, would later be one of the key figures in founding the National Football League.
Tags: Eastland  maritime  disaster  Chicago 
Added: 27th April 2017
Views: 1036
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Posted By: Lava1964
Black Tom Explosion 1916 Even though the United States was neutral nation in 1916, it was still occasionally affected by acts of war. The most notable to happen on land was the Black Tom explosion on July 30, 1916, in Jersey City, NJ. It was an act of sabotage by German agents to destroy American-made munitions that were to be supplied to the Allies in the First World War. Black Tom was originally a man-made island constructed around a large black rock in New York Harbor that was a well-known hazard to naval navigation. It was eventually connected by the Lehigh Valley Railroad to the mainland and was absorbed into Jersey City. It became a major munitions depot even before the war. Shortly after midnight on July 30, 1916, a series of small fires was discovered on the pier. Some guards tried to fight the fires while others fled, fearing an explosion. They had good reason to fear such a calamity as 2 million pounds of explosives and small arms were stored on Black Tom Island awaiting shipment to Czarist Russia. The feared explosion came; actually there were several explosions. The first and biggest occurred at 2:08 a.m. It had the force of an earthquake measuring 5.5 on the Richter scale. Flying fragments caused more than $100,000 in damages to the Statue of Liberty on its gown and torch. (To date, the torch has never been reopened to the public.) Windows 25 miles were shattered and the explosion was felt as far away as Philadelphia. Four people were definitely killed by the blast--including an infant. Some sources claim the fatality total was seven. Blame originally was directed at Black Tom Island watchmen who had lit small smudge-pot fires to drive away mosquitoes, but they were quickly absolved of blame when the true nature of the fires showed obvious evidence of arson. German saboteurs were blamed for the incident which caused $20 million in damages. The Leigh Valley Railroad successfully sued the German government after the war but had no success in collecting any compensation until 1953 when the West German government agreed to pay $95 million. The final payment was made in 1979.
Tags: Black  Tom  Explosion  1916  German  sabotage 
Added: 13th January 2018
Views: 1131
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Posted By: Lava1964

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