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USSR Wins 1956 Olympic Hockey Until the 1950s, Canada could send virtually any amateur team to Europe and win the annual International Ice Hockey Federation world championship tourney. (For example, Canada beat Denmark 49-0 in one game at the 1949 event using a team from Sault Ste. Marie, ON!) The Soviet Union took an interest in Olympic sports in the early 1950s. They surprisingly beat Canada 7-2 at the 1954 world tourney in their debut. In 1955 Canada sent the national amateur champs from Penticton, BC and won the championship by beating the USSR 5-0. With the national senior amateur championship team from Kitchener, ON representing Canada at the 1956 Olympics at Cortina, Italy, Canada was supposed to win another Olympic championship. Surprisingly they finished third after losing to both the USA and USSR. This clip shows the Soviets' 4-0 win over the USA and their 2-0 win over Canada. Canada's goalie was Denis Brodeur--the father of NHL great Martin Brodeur. Men were men back then: Few wore helmets and goalies didn't wear masks.
Tags: 1956  Winter  Olympic  hockey  Cortina 
Added: 14th February 2014
Views: 1697
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Posted By: Lava1964
Foster Hewitt Canada's first pioneer sports broadcaster was diminutive Foster Hewitt. His first hockey broadcast was an amateur game between Toronto and Kitchener in 1923--which he did from the penalty box. He became the voice of the Toronto Maple Leafs on Hockey Night In Canada when its radio broadcasts began in 1931. For the next 40 years Hewitt's familiar voice was the most famous in Canada. He regularly began his broadcasts with the phrase, 'Hello, Canada...and hockey fans in the United States and Newfoundland.' Hewitt smoothly made the transition to television in 1952--and his TV broadcasts were still simulcast on radio until 1963. That year his son Bill took over the TV broadcasts; Foster continued hockey broadcasts on the radio until 1970. Hewitt was lured out of retirement to call the historic Canada-Russia series in 1972. He was given the Order of Canada that same year. Hewitt died in 1985 at the age of 82.
Tags: Foster  Hewitt  hockey  broadcaster 
Added: 7th January 2010
Views: 1397
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Posted By: Lava1964
The Kraut Line During the 1930s and 1940s, the Boston Bruins' offense was geared around its famous 'Kraut Line' of Bobby Bauer, Milt Schmidt and Woody Dumart. All three hailed from Kitchener, Ontario which had (and still has) a large German population. The line helped Boston win Stanley Cups in both 1939 and 1941. During the Second World War, the threesome's moniker was changed to 'the Kitchener Kids' because, as hockey historian Brian McFarlane noted with understatement, 'Things German weren't too popular.'
Tags: hockey  Kraut  Line  Boston  Bruins 
Added: 19th May 2010
Views: 2684
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Posted By: Lava1964
Bowling for Dollars Bowling for Dollars was a program that began in Baltimore in the 1960s and rapidly spread across the North American local TV landscape. Sports Illustrated once ran a story about the phenomenon. The show's concept was simple: Local bowlers tried to win a growing jackpot by rolling two consecutive strikes. If the jackpot wasn't won, it was increased for the next bowler. (If they didn't win the jackpot, contestants usually got paid a dollar per pin they knocked down.) Five-pin bowling is popular in Canada. In the version of Bowling for Dollars that aired on CKCO-TV in Kitchener, Ontario, three strikes were needed to win the jackpot--which was split with a lucky "pin pal" whose name was drawn from a Plexiglass drum of postcards sent in by viewers. The jackpot once reached a lofty $9,000. As many as nine different bowlers sometimes appeared on a 30-minute episode. Despite being low-budget and corny, Bowling for Dollars ran for a remarkable 24 years on CKCO-TV from 1971 to 1995. For most of its run, the show aired weeknights at 6:30 p.m.--right after the six o'clock news ended. This clip is likely from the early 1980s. Bill Inkol (who had the longest tenure as host) is the man holding the microphone.
Tags: Bowling  for  Dollars  Kitchener  CKCO-TV 
Added: 30th November 2013
Views: 2054
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Posted By: Lava1964

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