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2003 Masters Tournament Protest In 2003, the National Organization of Women, led by Martha Burk (pictured here), staged a protest at the Masters Golf Tournament because the host club, Augusta National Golf Club, only accepts male members. Burk got more than she bargained for. Enterprising vendors began selling golf balls with Burk's face on them above the phrase 'The Burk Stops Here!' Augusta's city council passed a law restricting protesters to a vacant lot about a mile from the golf course. Counter-protests began, and they begot more protests. Jesse Jackson supported Burk, so a group of anti-Jackson protesters picketed him. A chapter of the KKK--which turned out to be a one-man outfit--supported Augusta National. Weirdos and attention-seekers of all types flocked to the protest site. One man wore a tuxedo and carried a sign that said, 'Formal Protest.' Another man with an anti-feminist slant carried a placard saying, 'Make My Dinner.' Another group called People Against Ridiculous Protests picketed everybody. Perhaps the most noteworthy and creative protester was a gentlemen who loudly passed gas from the window of a moving minivan when Burk began to speak. Pun-loving Steve Rushin of Sports Illustrated comically referred to the gesture as a 'drive-by tooting.'
Tags: golf  Masters  protest  Martha  Burk 
Added: 7th August 2008
Views: 2387
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Lawn Jockeys Signified An Underground Railroad Home A lot of people don't know the real meaning behind these statues, so they vandalize them, bitch about them being racist, etc. When the image of a black 'footman' with a lantern signified the home was a stop on the Underground Railroad. These are largely a northern thing, and weren't commonly found in the South until after WWII when northerners moved there and brought this custom with them. The clothing of the statue was also coded. A striped jockey's shirt meant that this was a place to swap horses, while a footman in a tailed coat meant overnight lodgings/food, and a blue sailor's waistcoat meant the homeowner could take you to a port and get you on a ship to Canada. I always laugh when I hear black folks talk about how racist these are, because honestly, the cats who had them were likely the LEAST racist. Later, these came back into popularity after WWII, and they were again coded to show the white homeowners supported early civil rights efforts, weren't Klan, etc.
Tags: Lawn  Jockeys  Signified  An  Underground  Railroad  Home  black  African  American  slavery    Civil  Rights  KKK  Klan  civil  rights 
Added: 28th January 2016
Views: 3194
Rating:
Posted By: Cathy

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