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1972 Stanley Cup Finals - Game 6 Highlights For years it was believed only a few highlights of the 1972 Stanley Cup finals between the Boston Bruins and New York Rangers still existed. (Before 1980, TV networks often erased sports programming in order to reuse the expensive videotapes for other events. After all, the conventional wisdom was that nobody would be interested in seeing old sports events! For example, there is no surviving full videotape of Super Bowl I.) Someone at Madison Square Garden discovered the New York Rangers had filmed the sixth game of the Cup finals for their own purposes. In 2008 MSG network combined an audio tape of Dan Kelly's CBS broadcast (preserved by a Bruins fan) and dubbed it over the silent film the Rangers had made. The happy result is this 12-minute condensed version of the game in which the Bruins defeated the Rangers 3-0 to win their fifth Stanley Cup. Look for the brilliance of Boston's Bobby Orr to be the deciding factor. Note: You may have to crank up the sound to adequately hear the legendary voice of Dan Kelly do the play-by-play.
Tags: 1972  Stanley  Cup  final  Game  6 
Added: 6th January 2015
Views: 1300
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Posted By: Lava1964
Dorothy Arnold - Missing Socialite One of the most intriguing missing persons cases in American history centers around a 24-year-old New York socialite, Dorothy Arnold, who seemingly vanished into thin air one afternoon in New York City in 1910. Arnold was from a wealthy family, the daughter of the 73-year-old head of a prosperous import company and the niece of a Supreme Court justice. Educated at Bryn Mawr, Dorothy was an aspiring writer. On Monday, December 12, 1910, Dorothy left her New York City home at about 11 a.m. telling her mother she would be shopping for an evening gown for an upcoming event. Dorothy left the house with only the clothes on her back and about $30. Arnold went to a candy store and a bookstore where she bought items using the Arnold family credit. When she left the bookstore, Dorothy encountered Gladys King, a friend. King was the last known person to have seen Dorothy. No one who saw Dorothy on December 12 noticed anything odd about her behavior. She apparently never purchased the dress, so she had either lied to her mother or had been interrupted before she could buy it. On the day of her disappearance, Dorothy was fashionably dressed and was a familiar face in New York City. Therefore, it is unlikely that Dorothy could have ventured far without being noticed. That evening, when Dorothy strangely had not returned home for dinner, the Arnold family began making inquiries among her friends. They were unable to turn up any news of their daughter. Fearing some sort of scandal, Dorothy's family did not call the police right away--which was typical of the era. Anyone calling the Arnold home inquiring about Dorothy was told she was in bed with a headache. Dorothy's parents hired a lawyer who privately tried to find Dorothy for six weeks. His investigation got nowhere, so the police were finally contacted in late January of 1911. By that time, Dorothy's trail had gone hopelessly cold. Newspapers played up the story--especially in New York City. It led to several hoaxes, including two phony ransom notes being sent to the Arnold home and a postcard purportedly sent overseas by Dorothy. These were quickly dismissed as inauthentic. After 75 days, the police closed the case under the assumption that Dorothy was dead. However as late as 1935 the New York City police were still receiving tips about alleged sightings of Dorothy. So what happened to Dorothy? She had been unofficially engaged to a 42-year-old man named George (Junior) Griscom--a situation which displeased her family who considered him to be a loafer. There was absolutely no evidence that she and Junior had a falling out or had run away together. In fact, Junior put out several ads imploring Dorothy to contact him, but to no avail. He eventually moved on with his life. Another theory was that Dorothy was upset that her parents had cruelly mocked her for wanting to become a writer and because two of her stories had recently been rejected by magazines. Thus some people speculate Dorothy committed suicide believing that she was a failure. Still no one had evidence that she was anything but happy on the day she disappeared. Yet another theory is that Dorothy died at an illegal abortion clinic and her body was swiftly incinerated in the building's furnace--which was known to happen in 1910. In 1921, John H. Ayers, who headed New York City's Missing Persons Bureau, curiously told an auditorium filled with high school students that Dorothy's fate had always been known to the police and her family but he did not elaborate any further. When journalists pressed him for more details, he quickly claimed he had been misquoted.
Tags: missing  persons  case  Dorothy  Arnold 
Added: 16th January 2015
Views: 2079
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Town Changes Its Name to Joe Montana Joe Montana, who had quarterbacked the San Francisco 49ers to four Super Bowl titles, was acquired by the Kansas City Chiefs in 1993. A happy Kansas City radio announcer dreamed up a unique publicity stunt to celebrate. He persuaded the small town of Ismay, MT to change its name for the duration of the 1993 NFL season to Joe, Montana. The 22 residents of Ismay voted unanimously in favor of the oddball idea. As a reward, they were all treated to a trip to see the a Chiefs play a home game versus the Cincinnati Bengals.
Tags: Joe  Montana  Ismay  publicity  stunt 
Added: 6th February 2015
Views: 1004
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Forgotten Sitcom - California Fever In 1979 CBS presented a new, hour-long sitcom/adventure show about four free-spirited teenagers called California Fever. Here's a teaser plus the opening credits. (During its production, the show had been tentatively titled "We're Cruisin'.") It debuted on September 25, 1979--and was gone by December 11, 1979 after just 10 episodes. Its time slot was not an enviable one: It aired from 8 to 9 p.m. on Tuesdays--directly opposite the ABC juggernaut duo of Happy Days and Laverne & Shirley. California Fever centered on the activities of a group of west coast youths who were often found at Rick's Place--a Sunset Beach hangout. The emphasis was typically on cars, music, and the opposite sex. Cast members included Jimmy McNichol, Marc McClure, Michele Tobin, and Lorenzo Lamas. Alan O'Day (who had a #1 song in 1977 with Undercover Angel) performed the theme.
Tags: California  Fever  CBS  sitcom 
Added: 23rd March 2015
Views: 1333
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Posted By: Lava1964
Ron Howard Happy Days TV Guide Cover 1974 Happy Days began its 10-year run on ABC on January 15, 1974 as a mid-season replacement show. Its nostalgic look at 1950s America was well received by people of all ages. This TV Guide cover from June 1974 shows Ron Howard and actress Kathy O'Dare. Despite what the caption says, O'Dare was not a regular on the series. In fact, she was only in two episodes that aired more than a year apart in which she played two different characters. However, O'Dare was in the very first episode, titled 'All The Way.' The plot has Potsie arranging a date for Richie with classmate Mary Lou Mulligan, a vapid, shapely lass who has 'a reputation.' It turns out that Mary Lou's alleged reputation is based on mere gossip and she really is 'a nice girl.' O'Dare also appeared on an episode of The Brady Bunch in 1974 as the apple of Peter Brady's eye. O'Dare later reunited with Howard when they co-starred in a forgettable 1976 southern-style car-chase film titled Eat My Dust. O'Dare died at the young age of 52 in 2010.
Tags: TV  Guide  cover  Happy  Days  Ron  Howard  Kathy  O 
Added: 10th April 2015
Views: 2971
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Posted By: Lava1964
Forgotten Sitcom - Temperatures Rising In the fall of 1972 ABC introduced a hospital-based sitcom called Temperatures Rising. The show starred Cleavon Little and James Whitmore as doctors at Capitol General Hospital in Washington, DC. Joan van Ark played the head nurse. This is the opening sequence. Its 1972-73 season was fondly remembered by its fans, but ABC felt the ratings were disappointing. An enormous makeover revamped the show for its second season which was awkwardly retitled The New Temperatures Rising Show. Only Cleavon Little remained with the cast. The rest were axed. Whitmore was replaced by Paul Lynde and Little's role was basically downgraded to being Lynde's straight man. (Lynde had had his own self-titled sitcom on ABC in 1972-73 but it had been canceled after one season!) Furthermore the show's type of comedy changed drastically. The second season focused on the 'dark humor' of the hospital's exploitation of patients. The viewing public hated the new version of the sitcom. After 13 episodes The New Temperatures Rising Show was cancelled. Happy Days replaced it in its Tuesday time slot. The show resurfaced in the summer of 1974 with most of the first season's cast back in the fold, but by that time its viewership was gone. ABC quietly dropped Temperatures Rising from its lineup before the 1974-75 season began.
Tags: Temperatures  Rising  sitcom 
Added: 11th April 2015
Views: 1131
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Happy Birthday America Tags: Linda  Carter  America  Birthday  USA  United  States  of  America  Wonder  Woman  Television  TV  Show  Superhero  Super  Hero  Patriotic  Red  White  and  Blue  Caped  Crusader  action 
Added: 4th July 2015
Views: 1097
Rating:
Posted By: BigBoy Bob
Richie Cunningham - NFL Placekicker It can be an unfortunate or amusing coincidence when someone, quite by chance, has the same name of a celebrity or a fictitious character. Such was the case of of Richie Cunningham, an NFL placekicker who shared the name of Ron Howard's character from the TV sitcom Happy Days. The football-playing Cunningham was born in Houma, LA in 1970--four years before Happy Days hit the airwaves. He attended the University of Louisiana at Lafayette and did most of the kicking for the school's football team. Undrafted, he was signed by the Dallas Cowboys in 1994, but released. He was back with the Cowboys by 1997 where he enjoyed an outstanding rookie campaign. In 1998 he kicked 34 field goals to set a Dallas team record. On occasion, a snippet of the Happy Days theme would be played over the public-address system after Cunningham successfully booted a three-pointer. ESPN's Chris Berman, in doing the NFL highlight package, liked to say "Cunningham Potsied the ball through the uprights!" However, being an NFL kicker is a tenuous existence. Partway through the 1999 NFL season, Cowboys released Cunningham when his accuracy on field goals was just over 50 percent. By 2002 he was out of football altogether after stops in Carolina, Cincinnati, Jacksonville and Green Bay.
Tags: NFL  Richie  Cunningham  shared  name 
Added: 18th August 2015
Views: 1469
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Posted By: Lava1964
Tippee Toes Introduced in 1967 the doll continued into the 80's making little girls happy.
Tags: Mattel  doll  Tippee  Toes  stroller  girl  toy  1967 
Added: 31st August 2015
Views: 756
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Posted By: Freckles
Henry Winkler is 70 Today If this doesn't make you feel old, nothing will: Henry Winkler, the actor who played Fonzie on Happy Days, turns 70 today (October 30, 2015). Happy Days was routinely the number-one rated TV show in the late 1970s. It appealed to all ages and demographic groups. Here's a clip that shows why Fonzie was so popular.
Tags: Fonzie  Happy  Days  cool 
Added: 30th October 2015
Views: 762
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Posted By: Lava1964

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