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Roosevelt Hotel Extremely historic place for Hollywood buffs. Spanish Revival style. Opened in 1929 with owners including Louis B. Meyer, Douglas Fairbanks, and Mary Pickford. The first academy awards were held here in 1928 or 1929 (then called the "Merit Awards") in the "Blossom Room". The set for the TV show "This is Your Life" was located here. The Cinegrill was a famous 1940s nightclub still existing inside. Marilyn Monroe used to stay here and her ghost is said to still haunt the halls (hey - it helps business). Reasonable rates, but rooms facing Hollywood Blvd may be a bit noisier. You can see the hotel in the films Beverly Hills Cop II and Charlie's Angels 2.
Tags: hotel  roosevelt  la 
Added: 17th August 2007
Views: 3408
Rating:
Posted By: Teresa
Remembering Richard Widmark Who Passed At 93 Today HARTFORD, Conn. - Richard Widmark, who made a sensational film debut as the giggling killer in "Kiss of Death" and became a leading man in "Broken Lance," "Two Rode Together", Lt. Carl Anderson in this clip and 40 other films, died at his home in Roxbury after a long illness. He was 93. ADVERTISEMENT Widmark's wife, Susan Blanchard, said he died Monday. She would not provide details of his illness and said funeral arrangements are private.
Tags: Richard      Widmark      war      film    Halls  of  Montezuma  1951 
Added: 26th March 2008
Views: 1841
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Posted By: Old Fart
Hedy Lamar - Brains and Beauty Hedy Lamar combined brains and beauty. Her flight to America would make an excellent movie! Hedy was born in Austria in 1916. At age 17 - in the 1933 Czech film Ecstasy - she appeared in a steamy love scene, and swam nude in a 10 minute onscreen sequence. Ecstasy was banned in America for being indecent. At 19, her parents gave her into an arranged marriage with an Austrian arms dealer. She attended hundreds of parties as his trophy wife, mingling many times with Hitler and Mussolini, and lived in the Salzberg castle where The Sound of Music was later filmed. Hedy's husband was a control freak, and she fled him in dramatic fashions. In her first attempt, with her husband chasing her, she hid in a brothel. In desperation, with her husband stalking the halls of the brothel, she actually serviced a customer during her attempt to hide. In a later, successful escape, Hedy hired a maid who looked like her. She drugged the maid, donned her uniform, exited by the service entrance, and made her way to London. In some versions of this story, she escaped during a party, taking most of her jewels with her. Hedy later boarded a ship for America, and Louis B. Mayer signed her to a studio contract while en route to America, and still aboard ship. She must have been brilliant. While in America, Hedy co-invented a system of switching frequencies which is still used by the U.S. military to control some missiles. It's principles are also used in wireless internet technology, and in many cellphones. She got the idea while playing piano duets with her co-inventor: composer George Antheil. She would follow Antheil on the piano as he - switching from key to key and rhythm to rhythm - attempted both to throw her off, and to create interesting interplay.
Tags: actress  Hedy  Lamar 
Added: 25th August 2011
Views: 2857
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Posted By: Lava1964
London Great Smog - 1952 On Friday, December 5, 1952 a substantial fog rolled across London, England. This was not a particularly rare occurrence in that city. What made it memorable and lethal was the fact that it stayed for the better part of four days and basically brought the British capital to a standstill. The first week in December 1952 brought unusually cold weather to Great Britain. An unusual weather system known as an anticyclone moved over London. (Anticyclones are high pressure systems that create stationary surface hazes.) Not only was the thickening mist not moving, the smoke from the city's coal-burning furnaces in homes and offices was also trapped. In the early 1950s, the coal used in most London households was of a lower grade than the type used before the Second World War. (The higher quality coal was saved for export.) It also had a high sulfur content. Because the anticyclone was trapping both the fog and the coal smoke, the city was engulfed in a stinky blanket of mist that made many basic outdoor activities impossible. Driving became a dangerous adventure. City buses moved at a snail's pace, often with policemen preceding them on foot with torches. Within a short while bus service stopped altogether due to the low visibility. (The unaffected London Underground kept its schedule, however). Private cars were abandoned on the streets. Most outdoor activities, including sports events, were cancelled. The smog became so bad that it began to seep into indoor venues. Movie theaters and concert halls had to cancel shows because of diminished visibility. Finally, after four days of intense smog, a new weather system cleared London's skies on Tuesday, December 9. However, about 4,000 Londoners died from respiratory illnesses shortly thereafter related to breathing the unhealthy coal smoke. Health officials later put the death toll at about 12,000 from the lingering effects of what became known as The Great Smog. In 1956 the British parliament passed the Clean Air Act which mandated pollution controls and restricted furnaces to burning pollution-free fuels. The legislation worked. London has not experienced anything even close to The Great Smog of 1952 in all the years since then.
Tags: London  Great  Smog  pollution 
Added: 4th November 2015
Views: 1322
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Posted By: Lava1964

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