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Oregon Trail Video Game Classic How many of you played this game when you were younger. The Oregon Trail is truly one of the first best games of all time well before Nintendo and all the others.
Tags: Orgegon  Trail  Video  Game  Classic 
Added: 19th September 2013
Views: 1099
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Posted By: dusman
Kirk Gibson Home Run - 1988 WS Some baseball fans would argue this is the most dramatic moment in MLB history: It's Game #1 of the 1988 World Series. It's the bottom of the ninth inning. The Los Angeles Dodgers trail the favored Oakland A's 4-3. With two out and a runner on first base, an injured Kirk Gibson, hobbled by two bad legs, makes a dramatic pinch-hitting appearance. Vin Scully and Joe Garagiola provide the commentary.
Tags: MLB  Kirk  Gibson  home  run  1988  WS 
Added: 7th October 2013
Views: 1268
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Posted By: Lava1964
Chile vs Nobody - 1974 WC Qualifier In one of the strangest sporting scenes ever, on November 21, 1973 the Chilean soccer team took to the field at the National Stadium in Santiago in a crucial qualifying match for the 1974 World Cup tournament against no opposition! Their opponents were supposed to be the Soviet Union. Chile and the USSR were vying for the final berth for the 1974 World Cup tournament in West Germany. In the first game of a two-game playoff, the teams had played to a hard-fought 0-0 draw two months earlier in Moscow. However, a right-wing revolution toppled the elected Chilean government shortly thereafter. Hundreds of undesirable political leftists were executed at Santiago's National Stadium just two weeks before the scheduled return match. The horrified Soviets wanted the match to be played at a neutral site--or at the very least switched to a different venue within Chile. FIFA refused to move the game to another stadium, so the Soviets refused to play. At the appointed time, as this clip shows, the Chileans kicked off, made a few passes, and scored a goal into an unguarded net. Since there was no opposing team to take the subsequent kickoff, the referee forfeited the game to the Chileans. Chile was eliminated in the group stage of the 1974 World Cup.
Tags: soccer  World  Cup  Chile  USSR  qualifier 
Added: 16th October 2013
Views: 1147
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Posted By: Lava1964
Shirley Chisholm - The First Black Congresswoman Tags: Shirley  Chisholm  :  The  First  Black  Congresswoman  New  York 
Added: 6th November 2013
Views: 626
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Posted By: BigBoy Bob
Archie Meets Meathead In this classic clip from All in the Family, Archie Bunker first encounters his soon-to-be son-in-law, Michael (Meathead) Stivic.
Tags: All  in  the  Family  Meathead  Archie 
Added: 14th November 2013
Views: 1528
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Posted By: Lava1964
The Rat Pack What a night in entertainment history. The Count Basie Band performed and Johnny Carson hosted. It was a closed circuit feed to movie theaters as a fundraiser for the Dismas House, the first fully functioning halfway house.
Tags: 1965  Frank  Sinatra,  Dean  Martin,  Sammy  Davis,  Jr.  he  Count  Basie  Band    Johnny  Carson  Dismas  House  The  Rat  Pack 
Added: 20th November 2013
Views: 2152
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Posted By: Steve
Name Origins- Genesis Genesis - The first book in the Bible - their first album's title was "From Genesis to Revelation"
Tags: Genesis  to  Revelation  Genesis  Phil  Collins  80s  Band 
Added: 22nd November 2013
Views: 937
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Posted By: Music Maiden
Early Aviation Failures Check out this funny compilation of man's numerous failed attempts to build workable flying machines in the first decades of the twentieth century.
Tags: flight  aviation  failures 
Added: 23rd November 2013
Views: 1379
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Posted By: Lava1964
Failed Nungesser-Coli Flight 1927 Twelve days before Charles Lindbergh's famous first successful trans-Atlantic flight in 1927, two Frenchmen attempted the feat in the reverse direction but tragically vanished. Charles Eugène Jules Marie Nungesser and Francois Coli left Paris’s Le Bourget Airport on May 8, 1927, to fly across the Atlantic non-stop. They hoped to win the $25,000 Orteig Prize offered by a New York City hotelier while confirming France's place atop the postwar aviation world. The two co-pilots had been aviators in the First World War. Nungesser, a fighter pilot, had the third-highest rating for air combat victories amongst French pilots. François Coli was also an ace pilot who commanded a wartime squadron even though he had lost an eye while serving in the French infantry. They set off in the Levasseur PL.8 biplane – a fixed-wing aircraft with two superimposed main wings – named l’Oiseau Blanc (The White Bird) to fly the 3,600 miles from Paris to New York City without halting. The cockpit had been enlarged so that both could fit in. Their task was more difficult than Lindbergh's because they were flying into the wind and thus required more fuel. Their plane carried 11,000 pounds and barely got off the ground. Initial news reports circulated in France that the aviators had safely landed in New York, causing joyous celebrations to erupt in Paris. However, those reports were completely untrue: Nungesser and Coli’s plane disappeared somewhere over the Atlantic. The last verified sighting was when l’Oiseau Blanc was seen near Etretat off the coast of Upper Normandy. The twosome's flight plan would have taken them across southern England, then across Ireland to the Canadian coast and from there down to New York City. There were unverified reports of l’Oiseau Blanc being seen near Ireland and being heard near Newfoundland and the French islands of St-Pierre and Miquelon. Nevertheless, no sign of the airplane has ever been found. Three attempts to find wreckage--the last one occurring in June 2012--have all resulted in nothing.
Tags: aviation  Nungesser  and  Coli 
Added: 24th November 2013
Views: 1215
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Posted By: Lava1964
1927 Snyder-Judd Murder Case It is barely known today, but in 1927 the public was fascinated with the Snyder-Judd murder case. It was unsurpassed in media coverage until the 1936 trial of Bruno Hauptmann for the Lindbergh baby's kidnapping and murder. In 1925, Ruth Snyder, an unhappy housewife from Queens Village in New York City, began an affair with Henry Judd Gray, a married corset salesman. Stuck in a loveless marriage, Snyder began to plan the murder of her husband, Albert, enlisting the help of her new lover, though he appeared to be very reluctant. (Ruth's distaste for her husband apparently began two days after their marriage when he insisted on hanging a picture of his late fiancée, Jessie Guishard, on the wall of their first home. He also named his boat after her!) Ruth Snyder persuaded her husband to purchase an insurance policy that paid double indemnity if an unexpected act of violence killed him. According to Judd Gray, Ruth had earlier made at least seven attempts to kill her husband, all of which he survived. The culprits were not exactly criminal masterminds. On March 20, 1927, the couple garrotted Albert Snyder in his bed and stuffed his nose full of chloroform-soaked rags, then clumsily staged his death as part of a burglary. Detectives at the scene noted that the burglar left little evidence of breaking into the house. The behavior of Mrs. Snyder was wholly inconsistent with her story of a terrorized wife witnessing her husband being killed. Police quickly found the property Ruth claimed had been stolen hidden under the mattress of her own bed. A breakthrough came when a detective found a paper with the letters "J.G." on it. (It was a memento Albert Snyder had kept from former love Jessie Guishard.) They asked Ruth about it. Flustered, Ruth's mind immediately turned to her own lover, whose initials were also "J.G.," and asked the detective what "Judd Gray had to do with this." It was the first time Gray had been mentioned, and the police were instantly suspicious. Gray was located in Syracuse, NY. He claimed he had been there all night, but eventually it turned out a friend of his had created an alibi, setting up Gray's room at a hotel. Gray proved far more forthcoming than Ruth about his actions. He was arrested because his railroad ticket stub was found in his hotel wastebasket! Furthermore, Gray had escaped the murder scene by taking a taxi from Manhattan to Long Island. The cabbie easily remembered Gray because he had only tipped the driver a nickel on a $3.50 fare. He was charged with first-degree murder along with Ruth Snyder. Snyder and Gray blamed each other for plotting the murder. Both were convicted and died in Sing Sing prison's electric chair on January 12, 1928. Snyder was the first woman executed in New York state since 1899. This photo, illegally snapped by a New York Daily News photographer with a hidden camera, was taken at the moment when Snyder was jolted by the electric charge. The Snyder-Judd murder case inspired at least one play and two Hollywood movies: The Postman Always Rings Twice and Double Indemnity.
Tags: murder  Snyder-Judd  case 
Added: 26th November 2013
Views: 2155
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Posted By: Lava1964

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