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Career Academy Reel to Reel Tape Machine This is a small, portable reel to reel tape recorder that was made in Japan for the "Career Academy School of Famous Broadcasters." I attended that Academy in Milwaukee, Wisconsin back in 1969. These tape recorders were offered to students so that we had something on which to practice our "announcer voice" while we were not in class. It could handle 5" or smaller reels. It still works. At the time I attended the school two rather famous people were sponsors of it. Broadcaster, author and lecturer Robert St. John, and NBA star Kareem Abdul Jabbar, (of course, back then in 1969 he was known as Lew Alcindor, and played for the Milwaukee Bucks.) I got to meet both of these gentlemen. Mr. St. John was actually the author of the textbook we used. I became a radio broadcaster… but never a famous one. :-( This was back in the days when you could lose your broadcasting license and even your job for saying ‘hell’ or ‘damn’ over the air. Somewhere along the way the FCC has curled up and died!
Tags: reel  tape  career  academy  radio 
Added: 22nd August 2007
Views: 5768
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Posted By: jimmyjet
Newton Minow - Vast Wasteland Speech Despite being just 35 years old, Newton Minow became the head of the Federal Communications Commission in 1961 shortly after John F. Kennedy became president. During the 1960 election campaign, Robert Kennedy and Minow had long passionate discussions about the state of television and its influence on America. Minow became a vocal critic of the medium. Famously, in a speech given to the National Association of Broadcasters convention on May 9, 1961, Minow was extremely critical of television broadcasters for not doing more, in Minow's view, to serve the public interest. His phrase, 'vast wasteland,' is remembered years afterward. Minow said, 'When television is good, nothing—-not the theater, not the magazines or newspapers-— nothing is better. But when television is bad, nothing is worse. I invite you each of you to sit down in front of your television set when your station goes on the air and stay there for a day without a book, without a magazine, without a newspaper, without a profit and loss sheet or a rating book to distract you. Keep your eyes glued to that set until the station signs off. I can assure you that what you will observe is a vast wasteland.' While some Americans applauded Minow's assault on commercial television as a welcome criticism of excessive violence and frivolity, others criticized it as an elitist, snobbish attack on programming that many viewers enjoyed. Still others viewed it as government interference with private enterprise. Related trivia: The S. S. Minnow of the 1964–1967 television show Gilligan's Island was sarcastically named for Minow to express the producers' displeasure with his assessment of the quality of television.
Tags: FCC  Newton  Minow  television  vast  wasteland  speech 
Added: 3rd February 2011
Views: 2967
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Posted By: Lava1964
Ball Four - Sitcom Flop 1976 Ball Four was a situation comedy that aired on CBS in 1976. The series was inspired by the tremendously successful 1970 book of the same name by Jim Bouton. Bouton co-created the show with humorist and television critic Marvin Kitman and sportswriter Vic Ziegel. Bouton also starred in the series. Ball Four followed the Washington Americans, a fictitious minor league baseball team, dealing with the fallout from a series of Sports Illustrated articles written by Americans' player Jim Barton (Bouton). Like the book, the series covered controversial subjects including womanizing players, drug use, homosexuality in sports, and religion. The series included a gay rookie ballplayer--one of the earliest regular gay characters on television. The creative trio began developing the series in 1975, looking to groundbreaking series like M*A*S*H and All in the Family as models. CBS expressed interest and the creative team developed a script. CBS shot the pilot episode and ultimately bought the series. Ball Four aired at 8:30 PM Eastern time, which was during the Family Viewing Hour, an FCC-mandated hour of early evening "family-friendly" broadcasting. Consequently the writers had some trouble with the network's Standards and Practices in their attempt to portray realistic locker room scenes, especially the language used by the players. Pseudo-profanity such as "bullpimp" was disallowed, while "horse-crock" and "bullhorse" were approved. Ball Four debuted on September 22, 1976. Critics panned the series. One of the more charitable reviews called it "uneven in quality." CBS cancelled Ball Four after just five episodes.
Tags: sitcom  Ball  Four  baseball  CBS 
Added: 23rd August 2011
Views: 1719
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Posted By: Lava1964

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