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Sony TC-755 Reel to Reel Tape Deck A wonderful mmachine that was one of the first to introduce electronic switching to replace the older, manually operated levers. Still working great!
Tags: Reel  Sony  Electronics  Stereophile  Stereo 
Added: 16th August 2007
Views: 4694
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Posted By: jimmyjet
JIMMY JET Probably the earliest flight simulator ever made for kids and one of the greatest toys ever made! Made by the "Deluxe Reading" toy company in the early 1960's, and sold mainly in supermarkets. (You could also get them by mail-order from the old Spiegel catalog and other mail-order firms as well.) You controlled the steering with a yoke as your jet flew over moving terrain, (a rotating scenery cylinder,) controlling your airspeed as you lined up a "target," then fired (actual) rubber-tipped missiles by pulling the two missile-launching levers. Enough dials, levers, chrome and noise to delight any young fighter pilot! It was a blast knocking down my little green army men with the missiles! It used 4 'D' batteries.
Tags: Jimmy  Deluxe 
Added: 16th August 2007
Views: 7816
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Posted By: jimmyjet
Green Acres theme Green Acres was another 1960s sitcom with a very recognizable theme. It was a reversal of The Beverly Hillbillies: Rich urbanites move to the simplicity of a rural setting. This show had an element of surrealism about it. Oliver Douglas was often the only sane person among a group of crazies. It is reputedly Conan O'Brien's favorite TV show.
Tags: Green  Acres  theme 
Added: 30th September 2007
Views: 2733
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Posted By: Lava1964
     Remembering Anne Murray OK Lava, this one's for you. Anne Murray is a Canadian singer born in Springhill, Nova Scotia, known for her rich alto voice and her choice of songs appealing to listeners over a broad spectrum, including Pop, Country and Adult Contemporary styles. For many, her fame as the representative Canadian singer is rivaled only by Gordon Lightfoot. After the success of "Snowbird" in 1970, Anne had a number of subsequent singles that have charted both pop and country simultaneously. During 1970s and early 1980s, her hits included "Danny's Song" (1972), "He Thinks I Still Care" (1974), "You Needed Me" (1978), "I Just Fall In Love Again," "Shadows in the Moonlight" and "Broken Hearted Me" (all 1979), "Could I Have This Dance" (1980), "Blessed Are the Believers" (1981), and "A Little Good News" (1983). Her hits started to taper off into the mid '80s, and her last top 100 charting pop hit was "Now and Forever (You and Me)" from 1986, it also was her last #1 on the country charts.
Tags: anne  murray  you  needed  me  canadian  singers 
Added: 25th October 2007
Views: 2439
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Posted By: Naomi
Bruins-Flyers Rivalry The 1970s provided excellent hockey for NHL fans. One of the best rivalries was the Boston Bruins versus the Philadelphia Flyers. The two teams met in the playoffs four times in five seasons. In 1974, the upstart Flyers surprised the favored Bruins in six games to win the Stanley Cup. Two years later, in 1976, Philadelphia beat the Bruins in five games in a semifinal series. A year later Boston avenged the earlier defeats with a four-game sweep in the semis. (The victory was so decisive it got Boston's Brad Park and Gerry Cheevers on the cover of Sports Illustrated on May 9, 1977.) The following year, 1978, Boston again convincingly beat Philadelphia in five games in a semifinal. The 2010 Stanley Cup playoffs featured these two teams meeting in the postseason, a conference semifinal, for the first time since 1978. The Flyers won in seven games after losing the first three.
Tags: hockey  Boston  Bruins  Philadelphia  Flyers 
Added: 1st May 2010
Views: 2228
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Posted By: Lava1964
Time Asks Is God Dead The April 8, 1966 cover of Time famously asked a very emotionally charged and controversial question: 'Is God Dead?' The accompanying article began, 'Is God dead? It is a question that tantalizes both believers, who perhaps secretly fear that he is, and atheists, who possibly suspect that the answer is no.'
Tags: Time  Is  God  Dead 
Added: 4th February 2008
Views: 4729
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Posted By: Lava1964
1883 No-Cents Nickels In 1883, the United States unveiled its new 'Liberty Head' five-cent piece. Conmen immediately sensed an opportunity: Because the reverse bore the Roman numeral 'V' without the word 'cents,' it looked very much like the widely circulated five-dollar gold piece. Crooks simply painted the nickels gold and passed them off as five-dollar coins. To combat this practise, a few months later the mint issued a revised variety of 1883 nickels--these ones bearing the word 'cents' beneath the V. (That design lasted until the Liberty Head nickel was replaced by the buffalo nickel in 1913.) According to numismatic lore, a deaf mute named Josh Tatum was among the most prolific perpetrators of fraud with gold-painted no-cents nickels. He supposedly escaped conviction because he could not ask shopkeepers for change; he merely accepted what was given to him. This is where the verb 'to josh' is said to have originated.
Tags: 1883  nickels  numismatics 
Added: 22nd October 2009
Views: 1334
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Posted By: Lava1964
Steve Blass Disease Steve Blass of the Pittsburgh Pirates was one of the most dominating pitchers in the National League in 1971 and 1972. In the 1971 World Series Blass pitched two complete-game victories against the powerful Baltimore Orioles, allowing just two runs. He won a career-high 19 games in 1972 and was a member of the NL All-Star team. Then in 1973, inexplicably, the wheels fell off. Blass mysteriously lost his control. Blass' ERA ballooned to 9.85. He walked 84 batters and struck out just 27 in 88-2/3 innings. (His WHIP was 2.177; on average more than two batters per inning reached base.) Medical exams showed nothing was wrong. Blass spent most of 1974 in the minors trying to regain his form. In 1975, after a miserable spring training with the Pirates, Blass retired from baseball a month before his 33rd birthday. Scholarly baseball fans ever since have referred to a pitcher's swift, sudden, and irreversible loss of control as 'Steve Blass disease.'
Tags: Steve  Blass  baseball 
Added: 18th December 2009
Views: 2591
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Posted By: Lava1964
Gerry Cheevers One of hockey's most identifiable goalie masks belonged to Gerry Cheevers of the Boston Bruins. His make-believe 'stitches' were a statement: They represented the real stitches that would have scarred Cheevers' face had he not worn the mask. Every time a puck struck Cheevers' mask, Boston's trainer Frosty Forrestall would add another row of stitches to it.
Tags: Gerry  Cheevers  hockey  goalie  mask 
Added: 3rd March 2010
Views: 1545
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Posted By: Lava1964
Tinker to Evers to Chance Back in the day when sports writing was at its gaudy peak, scribes often used poetry in their description of people and events. The most famous sports poem is likely this one penned by Franklin P. Adams: These are the saddest of possible words: 'Tinker to Evers to Chance.' Trio of bear cubs, and fleeter than birds, Tinker and Evers and Chance. Ruthlessly pricking our gonfalon bubble, Making a Giant hit into a double Words that are heavy with nothing but trouble: 'Tinker to Evers to Chance.' This work was first published as 'That Double Play Again' in the July 12, 1910, New York Evening Mail. The Chicago Daily Tribune reprinted it as 'Gotham's Woe' on July 15, 1910. Three days later, on July 18, the New York Evening Mail republished it under the title by which it is best known today, 'Baseball's Sad Lexicon.' It described the double-play artistry of Chicago Cubs when the team was in its heyday in the first decade of the 20th century. (Yes, the Cubs actually had a heyday.) Second baseman Joe Tinker, shortstop Johnny Evers, and first baseman Frank Chance first played together in 1902. Although the poetic lament was accurate, the Cubs' famed trio never came close to leading the National League in double plays at any time. Nevertheless all three were inducted into the Hall of fame in 1946 largely because of Franklin Adams' doggerel. Based on sheer statistics, probably only Frank Chance deserves to be there. Although all three ballplayers are long dead, their double play prowess has been referenced in numerous literary works, movies, and TV shows as varied as Hogan's Heroes and The Brady Bunch.
Tags: baseball  Tinker  Evers  Chance  Chicago  Cubs 
Added: 4th January 2011
Views: 2290
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Posted By: Lava1964

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