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Suzanne Pleshette  Dies Jan 19th 2008  She Will Be Missed Suzanne Pleshette, the husky-voiced star best known for her role as Bob Newhart's sardonic wife, Emily, on television's long-running "The Bob Newhart Show," has died at age 70. Pleshette, whose career included roles in such films as Hitchcock's "The Birds" and in Broadway plays including "The Miracle Worker," died of respiratory failure Saturday evening at her Los Angeles home, said her attorney Robert Finkelstein, also a family friend. Pleshette underwent chemotherapy for lung cancer in 2006. "The Bob Newhart Show, a hit throughout its six-year run, starred comedian Newhart as a Chicago psychiatrist surrounded by eccentric patients. Pleshette provided the voice of reason. Four years after the show ended in 1978, Newhart went on to the equally successful "Newhart" series in which he was the proprietor of a New England inn populated by more eccentrics. When that show ended in 1990, Pleshette reprised her role - from the first show - in one of the most clever final episodes in TV history. It had Newhart waking up in the bedroom of his "The Bob Newhart Show" home with Pleshette at his side. He went on to tell her of the crazy dream he'd just had of running an inn filled with eccentrics. "If I'm in Timbuktu, I'll fly home to do that," Pleshette said of her reaction when Newhart told her how he was thinking of ending the show. Born Jan. 31, 1937, in New York City, Pleshette began her career as a stage actress after attending the city's High School of the Performing Arts and studying at its Neighborhood Playhouse. She was often picked for roles because of her beauty and her throaty voice. "When I was 4," she told an interviewer in 1994, "I was answering the phone, and (the callers) thought I was my father. So I often got quirky roles because I was never the conventional ingenue." She met her future husband, Tom Poston, when they appeared together in the 1959 Broadway comedy "The Golden Fleecing," but didn't marry him until more than 40 years later. Although the two had a brief fling, they went on to marry others. By 2000 both were widowed and they got back together, marrying the following year. "He was such a wonderful man. He had fun every day of his life," Pleshette said after Poston died in April 2007. Among her other Broadway roles was replacing Anne Bancroft in "The Miracle Worker," the 1959 drama about Helen Keller, in New York and on the road. Meanwhile, she had launched her film career with Jerry Lewis in 1958 in "The Geisha Boy." She went on to appear in numerous television shows, including "Have Gun, Will Travel,""Alfred Hitchcock Presents,""Playhouse 90" and "Naked City." By the early 1960s, Pleshette attracted a teenage following with her youthful roles in such films as "Rome Adventure,""Fate Is the Hunter,""Youngblood Hawke" and "A Distant Trumpet." She married fellow teen favorite Troy Donahue, her co-star in "Rome Adventure," in 1964 but the union lasted less than a year. She was married to Texas oilman Tim Gallagher from 1968 until his death in 2000. Pleshette matured in such films as Hitchcock's "The Birds" and the Disney comedies "The Ugly Dachshund,""Blackbeard's Ghost" and "The Adventures of Bullwhip Griffin." Over the years, she also had a busy career in TV movies, including playing the title role in 1990's "Leona Helmsley, the Queen of Mean." More recently, she appeared in several episodes of the TV sitcoms "Will & Grace" and "8 Simple Rules ... For Dating My Teenage Daughter." In a 1999 interview, Pleshette observed that being an actress was more important than being a star. "I'm an actress, and that's why I'm still here," she said. "Anybody who has the illusion that you can have a career as long as I have and be a star is kidding themselves."
Tags: suzanne  pleshette  bob  newhart  show    tom  poston  cancer 
Added: 20th January 2008
Views: 2409
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Posted By: Sophia
Emily Davison Suffragette Martyr At the 1913 Epsom Derby, a 41-year-old British suffragette named Emily Davison wanted to attract attention to her cause. Her plan was to disrupt the race by entering the course and pinning a pro-suffragette ribbon on a racehorse owned by King George V. As the archival footage shows, Davison was violently bowled over by the horse. She died a few days later.
Tags: Emily  Davison  suffragette 
Added: 25th November 2008
Views: 1592
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Posted By: Lava1964
Emilys Reasons Why Not - One Episode Sitcom Emily's Reasons Why Not was a very short-lived ABC sitcom starring Heather Graham. The show was based on the novel of the same name. Although seven episodes were made, Emily's Reasons Why Not was cancelled after one episode on Monday, January 9, 2006. The series centered on Emily (Graham), an author of self-help books who is unable to find success in romance. In the premiere episode she ends a bad relationship and adopts a new rule for her romances: if she can list five reasons to break up with a guy...she does. Emily gets help from her friends, among them Josh, whose character is strongly based on overtly gay stereotypes. The show was widely considered a less risqué copycat of Sex and the City. In the first episode, Emily is convinced the man she is dating is gay when he is actually a devout Mormon practising chastity before marriage. The show drew fire from pro-abstinence groups for its inability to portray an abstinent person without relying on stereotypes of homosexuality. Despite heavy promotion by both Sony Pictures Television and ABC, the show was pulled after the first episode due to drawing only 6.2 million viewers. Production was stopped after filming six episodes. ABC was said to have spent millions on promotion, including airtime, billboards and radio ads, and considered Emily to be the 'linchpin' of the network's post-football Monday-night schedule. After viewing it, ABC's entertainment president suggested that they considered the show lackluster and unlikely to improve. The New York Times attributed the show's cancellation in part to the extremely unappealing nature of the main character and her portrayal by Graham.
Tags: Emilys  Reasons  Why  Not  ABC  sitcom  flop 
Added: 6th February 2014
Views: 1086
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Posted By: Lava1964
Little Miss 1565 Mystery A few weeks ago I posted the story of the tragic Hartford Circus Fire of 1944. There were 168 fatalities in the blaze. Only six bodies were not identified. One case was particularly poignant. A little girl, whose corpse was unmarked by burns, was unclaimed by relatives. She was known as Little Miss 1565, from the number assigned to her at the city morgue. Her morgue photo was widely distributed--and yet no one came forward to claim her body. She was interred in a Hartford cemetery. Years later reseachers claimed she was Eleanor Emily Cook. She was re-buried in the Cook family plot. However, there are many doubters--and for good reason. Cook was a brunette; Little Miss 1565 was a blonde. From photos, the shape of Cook's face does not match those of Little Miss 1565, an neither do her dental records. Who is she? We'll likely never know. The best guess is that the girl's relatives wrongly identified another corpse, thus denying Little Miss 1565 of her true identity.
Tags: Little  Miss  1565  Hartford  Circus  Fire 
Added: 25th October 2009
Views: 7011
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Posted By: Lava1964
Troubled Actress Gail Russell Gail Russell was a dark-eyed beauty who starred with some of the most popular leading men in Hollywood in the 1940s and 1950s, including John Wayne, Joel McCrae and Alan Ladd. Born in Chicago on September 21, 1924, Russell was a shy child and often hid beneath her parents' piano when they entertained. The family moved to Los Angeles when she was 14. Even though art was Russell’s passion, her mother convinced her to audition at Paramount Studios. Gail was offered a standard seven-year contract at $50 a week. Upon graduating from high school, she signed with Paramount. Russell suffered terribly from stage fright. She made her first film appearance at 19 in Henry Aldrich Gets Glamour. The following year she appeared in Lady in the Dark. Although Russell’s role was minor, the film was nominated for three Oscars, which boosted her career. Russell's raven hair and enigmatic beauty was particularly suited to the ghost story plot of The Uninvited, her second film of 1944. During filming, Russell’s stage fright was so great that one of her co-stars suggested alcohol as a means to calm her nerves. Russell completed the film, but lost 20 pounds and later suffered a nervous breakdown. This film was also nominated for an Oscar, drawing even more attention to the young starlet. Russell played Emily Kimbrough in the 1944 comedy Our Hearts Were Young and Gay. The following year she starred as a schoolteacher opposite Alan Ladd in Salty O'Rouke, another Oscar-nominated film, then with Joel McCrae in the supernatural tale The Unseen. In 1946 she starred in Our Hearts Were Growing Up, a sequel with Diana Lynn. Before the year was over she completed yet another movie, The Bachelor’s Daughters, with Adolphe Menjou. Still, Russell continued to experience stage fright, liberally using alcohol to deal with it. In 1947, Russell performed one of her most famous roles as the innocent Quaker love of John Wayne in The Angel and the Badman. Rumors circulated that Russell and Wayne were having an affair, though they both denied anything more than friendship. In 1949, Russell once again starred as John Wayne's love interest in Wake of the Red Witch. When she learned that her husband had cast Russell in this role, John Wayne’s wife, actress Esperanza (Chata) Bauer, exploded in an alcoholic, jealous rage. When Wayne returned home late from the cast party, Bauer aimed a gun at her husband and pulled the trigger. The bullet barely missed Wayne’s head. Months later, Russell married her long-time boyfriend, television actor Guy Madison. In 1953, Russell was called to testify in John Wayne’s divorce trial and once again, Russell and Wayne both denied the affair. Two weeks later Russell was arrested for drunk driving, which fueled more rumors about an affair and caused serious damage to her marriage. Her alcoholic reputation so troubled Paramount executives they refused to renew her contract. Then Russell and Madison divorced, adding to her despair. In 1955, Russell left the scene of the crime after rear-ending another vehicle while intoxicated. In 1957 she drove her new convertible through the glass windows of Jan's Restaurant in Beverly Hills, pinning the janitor beneath her vehicle. Russell was picked up by Universal Studios and continued to star with some of the most famous names in Hollywood, including Randolph Scott. However, in August of 1957, when she failed to appear in court, officers were sent to her home and found her drunk and unconscious. The hearing was held at General Hospital where she was bedridden with severe effects from alcoholism. She joined Alcoholics Anonymous and stayed with this organization for a year, to no avail. In 1961, Russell starred in her last movie, The Silent Call. When filming was completed, she locked herself in her Los Angeles studio apartment, sketching and drinking. On August 27, 1961 Russell died from an alcohol-induced heart attack. She was just 36.
Tags: actress  Gail  Russell 
Added: 18th December 2010
Views: 4991
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Posted By: Lava1964
Bad News Bears - Sitcom Flop 1979 Successful movies don't often spawn successful TV series. Take the Bad News Bears, for instance. In the television version, Jack Warden portrayed former minor-leaguer Morris Buttermaker, the coach of the Hoover Junior High Bears, a sorry bunch of youthful misfits and bumblers. Catherine Hicks played Hoover Junior High principal Dr. Emily Rappant. Phillip Richard Allen played Roy Turner, the coach of the dreaded rival Lions. Corey Feldman, Billy Jayne (then credited as Billy Jacoby) and Meeno Peluce were cast amongst the team's players, and Tricia Cast played Amanda Wurlitzer, the Bears' star pitcher. Poor writing and subpar acting doomed this series. Three episodes into the series' second season, CBS cancelled The Bad News Bears due to low ratings. A few previously unaired episodes were shown during the summer of 1980.
Tags: sitcom  Bad  News  Bears  CBS  baseball 
Added: 23rd August 2011
Views: 1802
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Posted By: Lava1964
Readers Digest August 1970 Issue Date: August 1970; Vol. 97, No. 580 Articles, subjects and contributors in this issue: COVER: Bicycle Byway by Ralph Avery. From Bach to Books by Jeffrey R. Haskell. The Crow and the Oriole by James Thurber. Boss of the Park -- Umpires -- by Bill Surface. The Plains a Boy a Summer Day by Hal Borland. 41 Ways to Beat the High Cost of Living. Russia's Menacing New Challenge in the Middle East by Joseph Alsop. We Need Our Young Activists by John D. Rockefeller 3rd. Portrait of a Mobster -- Carlos Marcello -- by William Schulz. Sexual Inadequacy -- And What Can Be Done About It by Will Bradbury. How to Talk With Your Teen Ager About Drugs by Herman W. Land. Toward a Livable Environment: I Victory in the Everglades by Jean George. II A Sensible Plan for Future Development by James Nathan Miller. The Car in the River by E. D. Fales Jr. Bold New Directions for U S High Schools by Arlene Silberman. Poverty at the Border by Lester Velie. Try Giving Yourself Away David Dunn. Japan -- All Asia Watches and Wonders by Carl T. Rowan. The Gifts of Gregory Menn by Joseph P. Blank. Better Living With Machinery by Charles McDowell Jr. L Dopa Has Set Me Free by Floyd Miller. Time to Knock Out the Vote Thieves! by Louis B. Nichols. Provocative; Prophetic Margaret Mead by David Dempsey. How to Murder Your Husband by Jean Mayer. Rugged Idaho by Don Wharton. They Go to Prison on Purpose Arthur Gordon. What the Moon Rocks Reveal by Fred Warshofsky. The Lesson of the Lemmings by Ola and Emily d'Aulaire. Bottoms Up! by Jack Goodman and Alan Green. The Duel That Changed Our History by Thomas Fleming. Paper Magic of Origami by and Akira Yoshizawa by Leland Stowe. KGB: The Swallows' Nest "KGB" by John Barron.
Tags: Readers  Digest  August  1970  articles  magazine   
Added: 26th December 2014
Views: 2555
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Posted By: Cathy

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