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Memories of Danny Kaye Danny was born David Daniel Kaminsky in Brooklyn in 1913, the son of an immigrant Russian tailor. After dropping out of high school he worked for a radio station and later as a comedian in the Catskills. After his solo success in the Catskills, he joined the dancing act of Harvey and Young in 1933. On opening night he lost his balance and the audience broke into a roar of laughter. He would later incorporate this into his act. Enjoying growing popularity in 1939, Danny won over the Broadway crowd that same year with his show-stopping comic singing in "Lady in the Dark," in which he rattled off the names of more than fifty polysyllabic Russian composers in 39 seconds in a song called "Tchaikovsky." Throughout the early 1940's he performed night club acts, on Broadway, and to support the troops overseas during WWII. Though he appeared in his first film in 1937, it wasn’t until almost 10 years later that his film career hit its stride. Throughout his career he starred in seventeen movies, including THE KID FROM BROADWAY (1946), THE SECRET LIFE OF WALTER MITTY (1947), THE INSPECTOR GENERAL (1949), HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN (1952), and the incomparable THE COURT JESTER (1956). In one of his final performances, he proved the versatility of his talent and earned rave reviews for his impassioned portrayal of a Holocaust survivor in the 1981 television movie SKOKIE. In 1987 Danny died of a heart attack in Los Angeles. An amazing actor, singer, dancer, comic, and all-around entertainer, he was a Renaissance man off the stage as well as on, where he was a celebrated chef, a baseball team owner, and an airplane pilot, flying everything from Piper Cubs to Boeing 747’s. His deep and continued commitment to the betterment of the people of the world was an inspiration, and his intelligent humor created a style all his own that made him one of the most beloved entertainers of his time. In a clip from the 1952 film "Hans Christian Andersen", Danny shows off his incredible style with "Inchworm.
Tags: danny  kaye  actors  singers  comedians 
Added: 7th November 2007
Views: 2722
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Posted By: Sophia
Rick Monday Rescues Flag It was one of those sports moments that wasn't about sports: On April 25, 1976 at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, Rick Monday of the Chicago Cubs heroically snatched an American flag that was about to be set alight by two radical protesters. Monday recalls the event in an interview 30 years later.
Tags: Rick  Monday  flag  rescue 
Added: 24th December 2007
Views: 12520
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Posted By: Lava1964
Ozzy Osbourne Take Me Out To The Ballgame In 1998 the Chicago Cubs began a tradition at Wrigley Field called Singin' The Stretch in which a celebrity leads the crowd in Take Me Out To The Ballgame. Here is heavy metal icon Ozzy Osbourne doing the honors in August 2003.
Tags: Ozzy  Osbourne 
Added: 21st March 2008
Views: 2232
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Posted By: Lava1964
Steve Bartman Incident The most infamous example of a sports fan influencing the outcome of a game occurred on October 14, 2003. It was the sixth game of the National League Championship Series. The hard-luck Chicago Cubs led the Florida Marlins three games to two and 3-0 in the top of the eighth inning. With the Cubs just five outs away from advancing to the World Series for the first time since 1945, a foul ball drifted one row into Wrigley Field's seats along the third base line. Cubs' left fielder Moises Alou drifted over to make the catch, but spectator Steve Bartman--and several other fans--tried to catch the ball. Bartman (shown here with his arms outstretched) got his hands on it briefly, thus preventing Alou from having a chance to make the catch. Fan interference could not be called because the ball was actually over the seating area. Bartman was escorted from Wrigley Field to protect him from furious fellow Cub fans. Six police cars surrounded his home. Bartman has been in hiding ever since. The Marlins ended up scoring eight runs that inning and won the game 8-3. They also won the seventh game of the NLCS and the 2003 World Series.
Tags: baseball  Steve  Bartman  incident 
Added: 8th September 2008
Views: 3859
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Posted By: Lava1964
Steve Bartman Incident Parody The infamous Steve Bartman incident is parodied on According To Jim.
Tags: Steve  Bartman  baseball  Cubs  parody 
Added: 8th September 2008
Views: 5788
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Posted By: Lava1964
Eddie Waitkus Shooting 1949 Ballplayer Eddie Waitkus was the shooting victim of an obsessed female fan. Waitkus had broken into the National League with the Chicago Cubs in 1941 but was traded to the Philadelphia Phillies in 1949. Nineteen-year-old Ruth Ann Steinhagen of Chicago had become obsessed with Waitkus as a 14-year-old. When he was traded to the Phillies, she snapped. During a Phillies' road trip to Chicago on June 14, 1949, Steinhagen checked into the Edgewater Beach Hotel where the Phillies were staying. She left a note for Waitkus to come to her hotel room to discuss urgent business. Believing the note to be from a friend of a friend, Waitkus arrived at Steinhagen's room and was invited in. Steinhagen briefly excused herself and returned with a rifle. Steinhagen blurted, 'You're not going to bother me anymore!' Then she shot Waitkus in the chest and calmly phoned the hotel's front desk to report the shooting. Waitkus nearly died on the operating table several times, but pulled through. He continued his major league career until 1955. Steinhagen was never charged with a crime. Instead she was committed to a mental institution. After three years she was deemed sane and released. Waitkus' shooting inspired Bernard Malamud's story 'The Natural.' Waitkus died in 1972, at age 53, of esophogeal cancer. Steinhagen is said to still live on Chicago's north side.
Tags: Eddie  Waitkus  shooting  Ruth  Ann  Steinhagen 
Added: 26th October 2009
Views: 3256
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Posted By: Lava1964
Tinker to Evers to Chance Back in the day when sports writing was at its gaudy peak, scribes often used poetry in their description of people and events. The most famous sports poem is likely this one penned by Franklin P. Adams: These are the saddest of possible words: 'Tinker to Evers to Chance.' Trio of bear cubs, and fleeter than birds, Tinker and Evers and Chance. Ruthlessly pricking our gonfalon bubble, Making a Giant hit into a double – Words that are heavy with nothing but trouble: 'Tinker to Evers to Chance.' This work was first published as 'That Double Play Again' in the July 12, 1910, New York Evening Mail. The Chicago Daily Tribune reprinted it as 'Gotham's Woe' on July 15, 1910. Three days later, on July 18, the New York Evening Mail republished it under the title by which it is best known today, 'Baseball's Sad Lexicon.' It described the double-play artistry of Chicago Cubs when the team was in its heyday in the first decade of the 20th century. (Yes, the Cubs actually had a heyday.) Second baseman Joe Tinker, shortstop Johnny Evers, and first baseman Frank Chance first played together in 1902. Although the poetic lament was accurate, the Cubs' famed trio never came close to leading the National League in double plays at any time. Nevertheless all three were inducted into the Hall of fame in 1946 largely because of Franklin Adams' doggerel. Based on sheer statistics, probably only Frank Chance deserves to be there. Although all three ballplayers are long dead, their double play prowess has been referenced in numerous literary works, movies, and TV shows as varied as Hogan's Heroes and The Brady Bunch.
Tags: baseball  Tinker  Evers  Chance  Chicago  Cubs 
Added: 4th January 2011
Views: 2290
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Posted By: Lava1964
Rick Monday Saves American Flag 1976 At a time when the USA was experiencing a resurgence of patriotism with the Bicentennial, a pair of protesters apparently didn't get the message that the 1960s were over: The Cubs and Dodgers were playing in Los Angeles and with the Dodgers batting in the bottom of the 4th inning, two men ran onto the field, intending to burn an American flag. The men spread the flag on the outfield grass, and one of them soaked it in lighter fluid as the other was about to ignite it. A quick-thinking Rick Monday ran towards the men, grabbing the flag and preventing the desecration of the Stars and Stripes.
Tags: Sports 
Added: 7th December 2014
Views: 1374
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Posted By: WestVirginiaRebel
Rennie Stennett - 7-Hit Game On Tuesday, September 16, 1975, Rennie Stennett of the Pittsburgh Pirates accomplished something that no other MLB player did in the 20th century: He got seven hits in a nine-inning game. The hapless victims were the Chicago Cubs who were pummelled 22-0 in their home ballpark, Wrigley Field. Luckily for the hometown Cubs, fewer than 5,000 of their fans were present to witness the most lopsided shutout in MLB history. Stennett was the Pirates' second baseman and leadoff hitter. He began the offensive barrage with a leadoff double off Cubs' starter Rick Reuschel (who gave up eight runs in one-third of an inning before being yanked.) Stennett got a second hit in the first inning, a single, as the Pirates jumped out to a quick 9-0 lead. Stennett got two other extra-base hits--another double and a triple--before being removed in the seventh inning for a pinch runner. He had gone 7-for-7 at the plate and collected 11 total bases and two RBIs. The triple came off Rick Reuschel's brother, Paul, in the sixth inning--another inning in which Stennett got two hits. The only other player in MLB history to get seven hits in a nine-inning game was Wilbert Robinson of the old National League Baltimore Orioles who did it in a 25-4 win over St. Louis on June 10, 1892.
Tags: baseball  Rennie  Stennett  Pittsburgh  Pirates  hits 
Added: 27th May 2012
Views: 4343
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Posted By: Lava1964
Ernie Banks Anecdote Beloved Chicago Cubs great Ernie Banks passed away at the age of 83 on January 23, 2015. In this short clip from the early 1980s, former Cubs' broadcaster Jack Brickhouse relates an anecdote that illustrates why Banks was such a popular player with the fans.
Tags: baseball  Ernie  Banks  Jack  Brickhouse 
Added: 24th January 2015
Views: 926
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Posted By: Lava1964

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