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Spittoons They'd be considered very unhygienic today, but in their day spittoons were actually a step up in public health. Used as a receptacle for spit generated by chewing tobacco, in the late 19th century spittoons became a common sight in pubs, brothels, saloons, hotels, stores, banks, railway carriages, and other places where people--especially adult men--gathered. Although brass was the most common material for spitoons, other materials ranged from basic functional iron to crafted cut glass and fine porcelain. At higher-class hotels, spittoons were often elaborately decorated. Spittoons were flat-bottomed, often weighted to minimize tipping over, and commonly had an interior lip to make spilling less likely even if they did tip over. Occasionally they'd have lids. Some had holes with an accompanying plug, to aid in draining and cleaning. Use of spittoons was considered an advance of public manners and health, intended to replace previously common habit of spitting on floors, streets, and sidewalks. Many jurisdictions passed laws against spitting in public--other than into a spittoon. Boy Scout troops organized campaigns to paint "Do not Spit on the Sidewalk" notices on city sidewalks. In 1909, Cincinnati scout troops allied with members of the Anti-Tuberculosis League painted thousands of such messages in a single night. A punny mass-produced sign common in saloons read: 'If you expect to rate as a gentleman, do not expectorate on the floor.' Spittoons were also useful for people suffering from tuberculosis who would cough up phlegm. Public spittoons would sometimes contain a solution of an antiseptic such as carbolic acid with the aim of limiting transmission of disease. With the start of the 20th century, medical doctors urged tuberculosis sufferers to use personal pocket spittoons instead of public ones; these were jars with tight lids which people could carry. After the deadly 1918 flu epidemic, both hygiene and etiquette advocates began to disparage public use of the spittoon, and use began to decline. Chewing gum replaced tobacco as the favorite chew of the younger generation. Cigarettes were considered more hygienic than spit-inducing chewing tobacco. While it was still not unusual to see spittoons in some public places as late as the 1930s, vast numbers of old brass spittoons met their ends when they were melted down during the scrap metal drives of the Second World War.
Tags: spittoons  hygiene  tobacco 
Added: 17th July 2012
Views: 4113
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Posted By: Lava1964
Karsten Braasch vs Williams Sisters One 'battle of the sexes' sports event that has curiously not gotten much attention was the impromptu beatdown that an obscure male German professional tennis player named Karsten Braasch handed to both Serena and Venus Williams during the 1998 Australian Open. At that event, the Williams sisters confidently walked into the Australian ATP office and boldly announced that either one of them could beat a top-200 male player. The 30-year-old Braasch, who had been ranked 38th in the world at his peak in 1994 but had dropped to 203rd by 1998, accepted the sisters' crazy challenge. On January 26, 1998, with no advance publicity, the three of them went to a distant practice court to play a couple of sets. There were no officials and no TV cameras present--and only a smattering of spectators who happened to wander near the court by chance. Serena, then 16, was blasted 6-1 by Braasch. Venus, a year older than her sister, fared only slightly better, losing 6-2. Braasch gleefully rubbed in his dominance by smoking cigarettes and drinking beers during the changeovers. Serena, who would win the women's title at the U.S. Open later that year, was humbled by the shellacking. "It was extremely hard," she told reporters who descended upon the challenge match. "I didn't know it would be that hard. I hit shots that would have been winners on the WTA Tour, and he got to them easily." When Braasch was asked if either of the Williams sisters could beat a top male player, he opined, "Against anyone in the top 500, no chance--because I was playing like [number] 600 today."
Tags: tennis  Karsten  Braasch  Williams  sisters   
Added: 12th September 2012
Views: 40813
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Posted By: Lava1964
The Treat That Is Really A Trick Tags: Smoking  Trick  or  Treat  Dorthoy  Lamour  Chesterfield  Cigarettes 
Added: 15th November 2012
Views: 1860
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Posted By: pfc
Dorothy Kilgallen 1937 Cigarette Ad From 1937, newspaper reporter and columnist Dorothy Kilgallen (later to be a regular panelist on What's My Line) appears in a magazine ad for Camel cigarettes. She is refrred to as a "spunky, globe-circling girl reporter."
Tags: cigarette  ad  Dorothy  Kilgallen 
Added: 6th December 2012
Views: 2338
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Posted By: Lava1964
Nothing Says Merry Christmas Like A Carton Of Emphysema Tags: Nothing  Says  Merry  Christmas  Like  A  Carton  Of  Emphysema  Ann  Southern  Lucky  Strike  Cigarettes 
Added: 16th December 2012
Views: 2605
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Posted By: pfc
ETs Grandma Phone Home Tags: ET    extraterrestrial  funny  50s  photo  1950s  cigarette  holder 
Added: 19th January 2013
Views: 1568
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Posted By: Cliffy
Lou Gehrig Beer and Cigarette Photo This 1936 photo from Life Magazine's archives shows New York Yankee great Lou Gehrig enjoying a beer and a cigarette in the clubhouse following a game.
Tags: Lou  Gehrig  baseball  beer  cigarette 
Added: 16th September 2013
Views: 1310
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Posted By: Lava1964
Nothing says Trick or Treat Better Tags: Dorothy  Lamar  Cigarette  Ads  Halloween  smoking  actress   
Added: 18th October 2013
Views: 1980
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Posted By: Cathy
Edward R Murrow Stamp Controversy This commemorative postage stamp honoring the late great journalist Edward R. Murrow was somewhat controversial when it was released to the public in 1994. Why? It was based on a photograph of Murrow in which he was holding a cigarette. The cigarette was conveniently omitted from the image when the stamp was created, irking a few people who knew the chain-smoking Murrow was seldom seen without a cigarette in his hand. (Murrow routinely smoked 65 cigarettes a day, claimed he couldn't go without one for more than 30 minutes, had surgery in 1963 to remove a blackened lung, and died in 1965 of lung cancer.)
Tags: censored  postage  stamp  Edward  Murrow 
Added: 16th July 2014
Views: 1040
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Posted By: Lava1964
Bradford City Grandstand Fire - 1985 Here is video of a terrible sports calamity: On May 11, 1985, English soccer club Bradford City were celebrating their promotion from the third division to the second division, having mathematically clinched the championship with a week to spare. The final game of the 1984-85 season at Valley Parade Stadium was against Lincoln City. More than 11,000 spectators were on hand--about twice the home average that season--to witness the festive pregame ceremonies featuring the championship trophy presentation. Yorkshire Television, with John Helm providing the commentary, was present to record the match for a tape-delayed broadcast the following day. Everyone was in a jovial mood until about 40 minutes after the match began. A fire broke out underneath Section G of the wooden grandstand--an antiquated structure that had not been modified since 1911 and was slated for demolition at the end of the season. The blaze likely started from a discarded match or cigarette that fell through the grandstand's floor boards. Beneath the grandstand was an enormous amount of flammable material; the team used the area for storage of old programs, among other things. Because of windy conditions, within four minutes a huge fire had engulfed the grandstand. There were no extinguishers nearby and no easy way to exit the grandstand in the event of an emergency. Initially it appeared that everyone was able to escape the danger by jumping onto the pitch, but 56 people died and 265 others were injured. Most of the fatalities were fans under 20 years old or over 70. One victim was Sam Firth, the club's 86-year-old former chairman. Many fans perished near locked gates or in the washrooms under the stands. Wooden grandstands were outlawed at stadiums in the UK following the tragedy. There were many heroic actions during the fire. Some 50 fans later received commendations for their rescue efforts.
Tags: soccer  Bradford  City  Fire 
Added: 17th July 2014
Views: 1891
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Posted By: Lava1964

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