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The Insiders Here is an opening sequence for the 1985-6 ABC TV series The Insiders which starred Nicholas Campbell and Stoney Jackson. The show aired Wednesday nights at 8PM and ran for 13 episodes. Nicholas Campbell would later star in the CBC(Canada) series Da Vinci's Inquest which ran a total of 91 episodes from 1998-2005
Tags: Insiders 
Added: 13th August 2009
Views: 1966
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Posted By: EONSFTFAN
USSR Wins 1956 Olympic Hockey Until the 1950s, Canada could send virtually any amateur team to Europe and win the annual International Ice Hockey Federation world championship tourney. (For example, Canada beat Denmark 49-0 in one game at the 1949 event using a team from Sault Ste. Marie, ON!) The Soviet Union took an interest in Olympic sports in the early 1950s. They surprisingly beat Canada 7-2 at the 1954 world tourney in their debut. In 1955 Canada sent the national amateur champs from Penticton, BC and won the championship by beating the USSR 5-0. With the national senior amateur championship team from Kitchener, ON representing Canada at the 1956 Olympics at Cortina, Italy, Canada was supposed to win another Olympic championship. Surprisingly they finished third after losing to both the USA and USSR. This clip shows the Soviets' 4-0 win over the USA and their 2-0 win over Canada. Canada's goalie was Denis Brodeur--the father of NHL great Martin Brodeur. Men were men back then: Few wore helmets and goalies didn't wear masks.
Tags: 1956  Winter  Olympic  hockey  Cortina 
Added: 14th February 2014
Views: 1701
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Posted By: Lava1964
Meryn Cadell - The Sweater The album Angel Food For Thought, whose first single "The Sweater" became a surprise Top 40 hit in Canada in 1992. "The Sweater" is a spoken word monologue, with a musical backing track--the first 20 seconds of Syd Dale's "Walk & Talk", revolving around a sweater left behind by a teenager's crush and the thoughts it inspired. (from wikipedia.org)
Tags: meryn  cadell  sweater 
Added: 29th July 2009
Views: 633
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Posted By: chrissiek
Viktor Tikhonov - USSR Hockey Coach One of the most familiar faces of Soviet Union hockey was the dour puss of coach Viktor Tikhonov who ran the Central Red Army club team and the Soviet National team with an iron fist and almost unchecked success for 20 years. Tikhonov was born on June 4, 1930. As a player, Tikhonov was a defenceman with the Soviet Air Force and Dynamo Moscow clubs, but he wasn't well known internationally until he became the head coach of both the Central Red Army team and the Soviet Union's national team in 1977. At one point Red Army won 13 consecutive Soviet Elite League titles--which isn't all that surprising considering Tikhonov had the authority of a Red Army general and could immediately draft any player into the armed forces if he showed promise. The USSR won eight IIHF world titles under Tikhonov plus Olympic gold medals in 1984, 1988 and 1992. The USSR's national team also won the 1979 Challenge Cup and 1981 Canada Cup. Tikhonov had power over his players' lives and used it to control every aspect of his team. They routinely trained together for 50 weeks per year while living in army barracks. Canadian hockey great Phil Esposito said the so-called Soviet "amateurs" were more professional than NHL players. Humorless and ruthless, Tikhonov was known for his dictatorial coaching style. He exercised control over his players' lives. His expected absolute obedience--or else. His players quietly called him "the last Stalinist." With tongue-in-cheek humor, western media often referred to Tikhonov as "Chuckles." Tikhonov constantly feared his players would defect if they ever got the slightest chance. Anyone he merely suspected of defecting would be left off teams planning to travel outside the Iron Curtain. In 1991, for instance, he cut Pavel Bure, Valeri Zelepukin, Evgeny Davydov, and Vladimir Konstantinov just before the 1991 Canada Cup. All of them had been drafted by NHL teams, and Tikhonov suspected they were flight risks. Even after the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991, Tikhonov stayed on as the national team coach of Russia for a few more years, but the newer players rebelled against his harsh authoritarian ways. Tikhonov mellowed slighty before going into retirement in 1996. After his retirement, Tikhonov lobbied the Russian government for more attention and better financing for the national team. His grandson plays on the current Russian national squad. Tikhonov died in November 2014.
Tags: hockey  coach  USSR  Viktor  Tikhonov 
Added: 19th February 2014
Views: 1117
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Posted By: Lava1964
John Vernon John Vernon is another great actor who usually plaid supporting roles and usually as a bad or mean guy. He was born in 1932 as Adolphus Raymondus Vernon Agopsowicz in Zehner, Saskatchewan Canada. He got his first big break in 1956 as the voice of Big Brother in George Orwell's 1984. Probably his biggest roles were the by the book mayor in Dirty Harry or as Dean Wormer in Animal House. He passed away of complications following heart surgery on February 1, 2005.
Tags: John  Vernon  Dean  Wormer    Animal  House  George  Orwell's  1984    Dirty  Harry   
Added: 27th April 2014
Views: 817
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Posted By: Old Fart
Brian Spencer - Hockey Tragedy On December 12, 1970 Brian Spencer was elevated from the minor leagues to the Toronto Maple of Leafs of the NHL. Prior to the Leafs' game versus Chicago, Spencer phoned his father, Roy, in British Columbia to tell him the good news and advise him to watch that evening's Hockey Night In Canada broadcast on CBC television. When the elder Spencer attempted to watch the game, though, he discovered the CBC affiliates in British Columbia were showing the Vancouver Canucks' home game versus California instead of his son's game from Toronto. Incensed, Roy drove 85 miles to the nearest CBC affiliate in Prince George, BC. Threatening several employees at gunpoint, he demanded the station switch its coverage from the Canucks' game to Leafs' game. The station complied. However, when Roy Spencer attempted to leave the television station, he got into a gun battle with police and was shot and killed. The feisty Brian Spencer spent nearly a decade in the NHL, but descended into a lifestyle of cocaine addiction afterward. He himself was shot to death at age 38 in a drug deal gone wrong in Florida on June 3, 1988.
Tags: Brian  Spencer  hockey  father   
Added: 12th October 2009
Views: 1565
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Posted By: Lava1964
The Crucified Soldier One enduring controversy about the First World War is a grisly tale of a Canadian soldier who was allegedly found crucified to a wall of a barn in Belgium. The unsettling incident is said to have happened following the terrible Second Battle of Ypres in April 1915 where the Germans first used poison gas. Rumors abounded that the enraged Canadians were not too interested in capturing German prisoners. According to the story, the Germans retaliated by crucifying a random Canadian prisoner. According to reports form three Canadian soldiers, they witnessed a comrade, Sgt. Harry Band, impaled on a wall by five German bayonets. The tale, which spread quickly around the world through newspaper stories, was dismissed by many people as wartime propaganda. Depicting this event is this 32-inch bronze scultpure titled Canada's Golgotha. It was removed from a post-war art exhibit after formal complaints by the Germans who insisted the story was bogus. As late as 1989 the sculpture was hidden from public view. In 2002, a war researcher uncovered letters from supposed witnesses to the event that were written to Band's sister. These letters attest that the awful story was true. Band's body was never recovered. He is still listed among the missing in action.
Tags: First  World  War  crucified  soldier 
Added: 25th October 2009
Views: 2890
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Posted By: Lava1964
Poppy - Symbol of Remembrance When Americans visit Canada in the the first days of November, they are often puzzled by the poppies Canadians wear on their jackets. The poppy is a symbol of remembrance that dates to the First World War. It is based upon a famous poem, In Flanders Fields. It was written by a Canadian battlefield surgeon John McCrae, who was in charge of an aid station in Belgium in 1915. McCrae wrote the verse after a close friend of his was killed by an artillery shell. (McCrae himself did not survive the war; he died of meningitis in 1918.) The full poem is below in the comments section. A good many Canadians know it by heart.
Tags: Remembrance  Day  Poppy 
Added: 11th November 2009
Views: 1228
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Posted By: Lava1964
Was Chester Arthur a Canadian Questions surrounding the birthplace of an American president are not new. It first happened more than a century ago with Chester Alan Arthur. Elected as vice-president in 1880, Arthur ascended to the White House in 1881 after James Garfield was assassinated. Arthur served as president until 1885. His administration is generally underrated by historians. Arthur was the son of Irish-born preacher William Arthur and Vermont-born Malvina Stone. Most official references list him as having been born in Fairfield in Franklin County, Vermont on October 5, 1829, but Arthur sometimes claimed to have born in 1830. (That is the year inscribed on his crypt. It also appears in some reference works.) Arthur's father had initially migrated to Dunham, Québec, Canada, where he and his wife owned a farm about 80 miles north of the American border. There has long been speculation that the future president was actually born on that Canadian farm and that his family moved to Fairfield afterward. If this is true, Arthur would have been constitutionally ineligible to serve as vice-president or president. Given the lack of official documentation and the seeming confusion about the year of Arthur's birth, historians have been unable to rule this possibility out. Although some of Arthur's political opponents circulated the Canadian-birthplace rumor during the 1880 election campaign, they could not prove it. No ironclad proof has emerged since.
Tags: Canada  Chester  Arthur  president 
Added: 17th November 2009
Views: 1443
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Posted By: Lava1964
Robert Stanfield Fumble Photo Think liberal media bias is only common to American politics? Think again! Robert Stanfield is often referred to by Canada's political right as 'the greatest prime minister Canada never had.' On May 30, 1974, during the Canadian federal election campaign, photographer Doug Ball captured his most famous image--a shot of Conservative candidate Robert Stanfield dropping a football during a rest stop at North Bay, Ontario. '[Stanfield was] knock-kneed, hands clasped awkwardly, grimacing as a football slipped between his bony fingers,' recalled Ball. It was the defining photo of Stanfield’s political career. That afternoon, Stanfield aide Brad Chapman brought out a football for some exercise, and Ball shot 36 pictures of Stanfield throwing, catching and--just once--awkwardly fumbling the football. In a glaring example of ‘image politics’ all too common in Canada, the Toronto Globe and Mail ran the unflattering picture on its front page under the headline, 'A political fumble?' No Canadian newspaper ran any of the 35 available photos of Stanfield catching the ball. The photo may have cost him the election, but Stanfield never held any grudges about the photo, which won Ball a national newspaper award. He autographed a copy it for Ball more than a decade later, signing, ‘To Doug: I should’ve taken off my tie. Robert Stanfield.’
Tags: media  bias  Robert  Stanfield  football  fumble  photo 
Added: 18th September 2010
Views: 4345
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Posted By: Lava1964

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