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Beatrix Schuba - Figure Skater Austria's Beatrix (Trixi) Schuba was singlehandedly responsible for changing the scoring rules of figure skating--because she was so boring. Schuba won the women's world championship in both 1971 and 1972 and the gold medal at the 1972 Winter Olympics in Sapporo, Japan. At the time 'compulsory figures' (also known as 'school figures') counted for a huge percentage of a skater's score and gave the sport its name. These consisted of skaters tracing patterns along the ice. Schuba was totally dominant at this aspect of her sport, but she was only a mediocre performer in the free skate. At the 1972 world championships in Calgary, Schuba had such a commanding lead after the compulsory figures that all she needed to do to win was show up for the free skate. That's basically what Schuba did. She came on the ice and skated only for a few seconds--but it was good enough for gold. The goings-on did not sit well with television audiences nor with the crowd in Calgary who felt Canada's Karen Magnussen, an excellent free skater, had been robbed of the gold medal. The next year FIS added a short program to the championships to reduce the importance of the compulsory figures. Schuba opted to retire. Compulsory figures were discontinued altogether in 1990.
Tags: Beatrix  Schuba  figure  skating 
Added: 6th June 2010
Views: 3540
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Posted By: Lava1964
Politically Incorrect Ad This is one of those jaw-dropping ads from yesteryear that just makes you shake your head. (I've never heard of the Canadian Patriotic Fund. I'm guessing this is a First World War-era poster.)
Tags: racist  ad  Canada 
Added: 8th June 2010
Views: 2889
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Posted By: Lava1964
Carnegie Libraries Andrew Carnegie made a vast fortune in the steel industry. His philosophy was that a man should spend half his life acquiring wealth and the other half using it for good works. Accordingly, Carnegie financed the building of the astonishing total of 2,509 public libraries in the United States, Canada, Great Britain, Australia, New Zealand, and other countries. Carnegie's passion for libraries began at a young age. He saw the value of public libraries as places for learning and community centers. Cities or towns that wanted a Carnegie Library had to provide the building site and maintain the library after it was built. Carnegie's money paid for everything else. A carnegie library always had to have 'open stacks' so the public could browse, and it had to provide free service. Carnegie's foundation built libraries from 1885 to 1929. (Carnegie himself died in 1919 at age 84.) Many of these libraries are still in use today, such as the one pictured here in Grass Valley, California.
Tags: Andrew  Carnegie  libraries  philanthropy 
Added: 18th June 2010
Views: 1323
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Posted By: Lava1964
US Customs Seize Chocolate Treats From CBC News in Canada: A Winnipeg woman was warned and nearly fined $300 after U.S. customs officials found a Kinder Surprise chocolate egg in her vehicle, which is considered contraband south of the border. U.S. authorities have banned the popular treats because they come with a plastic toy inside that could, if eaten, choke a small child. 'It's just a chocolate egg,' Lind Bird said, who was recently stopped at the U.S. border and selected for a random search. 'They said, 'If you were caught with this across the border you would get charged a $300 fine,' she said. The U.S. takes catching illegal Kinder candy seriously, judging by the number of them they've confiscated in the last year. Officials said they've seized more than 25,000 of the treats in 2,000 separate seizures.
Tags: border  US  customs  contraband  candy 
Added: 12th January 2011
Views: 1190
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Posted By: Lava1964
Civil War News Trading Cards Civil War News was a set of 88 collectible trading cards issued in the early 1960s by Topps. The set featured the colorful artwork of Norman Saunders, as well as three other artists. The card set was characterized by vivid colors, graphic depictions of violence, death, and blood (card #21 'Painful Death' being a prime example) and exaggerations of warfare. On the reverse, each card contained a brief history of a campaign, battle, or person. The information was presented in newspaper-article fashion complete with a headline. The complete set of cards, including a checklist, was first printed for the American market in 1962 to coincide with the centennial of the Civil War. A similar series with the same artwork was later issued in Canada. A&BC produced the sets in England. The cards came five to a wax pack with a stick of bubble gum. Also included in each package was a facsimile of Confederate paper currency. The original selling price was a nickel per package. Topps later issued the cards in cellophane-wrapped strips.
Tags: trading  cards  Civil  War  News 
Added: 9th February 2011
Views: 6174
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Posted By: Lava1964
Lawn Darts Remember Lawn Darts? Also known as Jarts or yard darts, they were a popular game at picnics and in backyards during the 1970s and into the 1980s. A typical set consisted of four to eight darts comprised of two different colors along with two plastic rings. The rings were placed a reasonable distance apart and served as targets for the darts. Rules varied from place to place, but the game was scored in a similar fashion to bocce or horseshoe-pitching. A game could be played as a one-on-one singles match or with partners. The metal tips were designed to dig into the lawn when they landed. Of course, they could also dig into somebody's flesh if the darts were thrown recklessly. In December 1988 the sale of the metal-tipped lawn darts was banned in the United States. Canada banned them the following year. Since then, safer forms of 'lawn darts' have proved to be very unpopular with consumers. Quality sets of the metal-tipped lawn darts are prized by collectors.
Tags: lawn  darts  recreation   
Added: 15th February 2011
Views: 6559
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Posted By: Lava1964
Carling Bassett For a short time in the 1980s, pretty Carling Bassett was the heartthrob of the female tennis tour. Born in Canada in 1967, she came from a wealthy background. Her father was a publishing mogul; her great-grandfather was a brewing magnate. 'Darling Carling' was the best female tennis player in Canada by age 14. Her peak ranking on the WTA tour was #8. Her best result in a grand slam event was a semifinal appearance at the 1984 U.S. Open. She never did live up to the lofty expectations, but Bassett did manage to capture two career singles titles and two doubles titles. She married tennis pro Robert Seguso in 1987, became a mother, and vanished from the pro circuit. She and her husband (along with Chris Evert) now run a tennis academy.
Tags: tennis  Carling  Bassett 
Added: 20th February 2011
Views: 2043
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Posted By: Lava1964
Marijuana Party Formed In 2000, a new political party was established in Canada--the Marijuana Party. The ultimate in one-issue parties, the Marijuana Party was established solely to end Canada's prohibition on cannabis. It has no formal platform on any other issue. In the 2000 Canadian federal election, the Marijuana Party ran candidates in 73 ridings, and received more than 66,000 votes. (That was about 2 percent of the overall vote total in those ridings.) In the three subsequent federal elections since 2000, the Marijuana Party fielded progressively fewer and fewer candidates each time. In 2008, only eight ridings featured Marijuana Party candidates. That year the party's biggest accomplishment was a fourth-place finish in the far north riding of Nunavut, where the Marijuana Party candidate finished ahead of the Green Party candidate.
Tags: Marijuana  Party  Canada  politics 
Added: 18th March 2011
Views: 1679
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Posted By: Lava1964
Boston Bruins - 1972 Stanley Cup Champs I posted this on the CBC News website in Canada following the Boston Bruins' Stanley Cup championship on June 15, 2011. It got such a wonderful response that I thought I'd share it here too: It had been 14,279 days since captain Johnny Bucyk hoisted the Boston Bruins' last Stanley Cup on May 11, 1972. To put things in perspective... Richard Nixon was in the White House. America still had combat troops in Vietnam. If you bought a quarter's worth of candy, you could get sick eating it all. Pitchers still batted in the American League. There was no such thing as rap music or punk rock. Nobody considered the possibility of terrorist attacks at the Olympics. The NHL had 14 teams. Few players wore helmets. Some goalies didn't wear masks. Nobody seriously thought hockey players from the USSR were good. There were hardly any McDonald's Restaurants in Canada. There were very few Tim Hortons either. Archie Bunker was in his heyday. Television sets had rabbit ears. Nobody thought the world was in peril from global warming or climate change or whatever they're calling it this week. Lotteries were illegal in Canada. Arthur Godfrey Time had still been on the radio two weeks earlier. Calculators could perform four functions and cost $179. Most people had rotary telephones. Forget about DVD players--VCRs didn't exist. The idea of bottled water would have been laughable. Computers were enormous things that occupied entire rooms and did simple calculations using punch cards. Hardware meant hammers and wrenches. Software didn't mean anything. People still sent telegrams. Life Magazine was still around. Canada still had the death penalty. O.J. Simpson was a hero. The Lord's Prayer was recited in public schools. Nobody thought it was wrong. A new car cost $2500. Hockey cards were a dime a pack--and they came with pink bubble gum covered in powdered sugar. Bobby Orr was the greatest player in the NHL. (Thirty-nine years later he's still the greatest of all time.).
Tags: hockey  Boston  Bruins  1972  Stanley  Cup 
Added: 16th June 2011
Views: 3592
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Posted By: Lava1964
Albertine Lapensee Mystery During the First world War, most of Canada's young able-bodied males enlisted in the military. As a result the quality of men's hockey dropped dramatically. For a short time, women's pro hockey took center stage--and Albertine Lapensee briefly and mysteriously became a superstar. Nicknamed 'the Miracle Maid,' the 26-year-old Lapensee played for her hometown Cornwall (Ontario) Victorias. Her hockey debut came in January 1916 against Ottawa; she scored five of the six goals in Cornwall's victory. Immediately after her debut game, Ottawa players complained that she was really a man. Suspicions and accusations dogged her the rest of her brief career. A week after her debut, Lapensee scored four goals in an 8-0 shutout against the Montreal Westerns before a crowd of about 3,000 fans. At one point the Montreal players yanked off Lapensee's toque to see how long her hair was. (She had braids that fell past her shoulders.) The continuous rumors about Lapensee's gender prompted her hometown newspaper, the Cornwall Standard, to vouch for her. Miss Lapensee, it said, '...played more with her brothers and other boys than with her girlfriends, and this accounts for the masculine style of play she has developed.' Furthermore, 'Scores of people in East Cornwall have known her since her infancy.' Albertine played on, indifferent to the rumours, and the fans didn't seem to mind too much either, as large crowds came to watch her play. In one game she scored 15 goals. When the Victorias agreed to play against the Ottawa Alerts, the Vics' manager had to guarantee Lapensee's appearance by contract. She even behaved like her male counterparts off the ice. She once refused to play until she had been paid, which nearly caused a riot. Although scoring records for the time are incomplete, they indicate Albertine scored about 80 percent of Cornwall's goals in the 1916-1917 season. The next season, Lapensee led her team to an undefeated season. Then, after two spectacular seasons, Albertine Lapensee vanished. There is no record of her playing hockey again--at least as Albertine Lapensee. Family legend says she went to New York in 1918 and had a sex change operation. She/he supposedly married and settled down to run a gas station near Cornwall under the name of Albert Smyth. There are no known photos of Lapensee. Her story is not widely known--not even in Canada.
Tags: hockey  Albertine  Lapensee  controversy  gender 
Added: 24th June 2011
Views: 2642
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Posted By: Lava1964

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