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Foster Hewitt Canada's first pioneer sports broadcaster was diminutive Foster Hewitt. His first hockey broadcast was an amateur game between Toronto and Kitchener in 1923--which he did from the penalty box. He became the voice of the Toronto Maple Leafs on Hockey Night In Canada when its radio broadcasts began in 1931. For the next 40 years Hewitt's familiar voice was the most famous in Canada. He regularly began his broadcasts with the phrase, 'Hello, Canada...and hockey fans in the United States and Newfoundland.' Hewitt smoothly made the transition to television in 1952--and his TV broadcasts were still simulcast on radio until 1963. That year his son Bill took over the TV broadcasts; Foster continued hockey broadcasts on the radio until 1970. Hewitt was lured out of retirement to call the historic Canada-Russia series in 1972. He was given the Order of Canada that same year. Hewitt died in 1985 at the age of 82.
Tags: Foster  Hewitt  hockey  broadcaster 
Added: 7th January 2010
Views: 1400
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Posted By: Lava1964
Britain Adopts Decimal Currency - 1971 February 15, 1971 was the momentous day when Great Britain ditched its old, antiquated monetary system and finally replaced it with 'decimal' currency similar to the United States and Canada. Under the old cumbersome currency of pounds, shillings, and pence, the pound was made up of 240 pence (denoted by the letter d for Latin denarius and now referred to as 'old pence'), with 12 pence in a shilling and 20 shillings (denoted by s for Latin solidus) in a pound. In an era before widespread computer use, monetary calculation, such as adding up sums of money, was far more complicated than with a decimal currency. Tourists were also confused by coins such as the 'half-crown' (worth two shillings and sixpence, or one eighth of a pound). Such a move had been encouraged by economists since the 1840s. British banks were closed for two days to prepare for 'Decimal Day.' It was also specifically scheduled for mid-February--statistically the slowest banking period of the year in Britain. From that day forward there have been 100 new pence to the British pound.
Tags: decimal  day  coinage  money  Britain 
Added: 7th January 2010
Views: 1278
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Posted By: Lava1964
Bugs Bunny Controversy The last line of the 1954 Bugs Bunny cartoon Bewitched Bunny upset the politically correct crowd in the 1980s. In the final scene Bugs' nemesis, Witch Hazel, is transformed into a beautiful female rabbit through magic but retains her witchy cackle. As Bugs walks off with her he comments, 'Sure, I know, but aren't they all witches inside?' In Canada, censors declared the offhand remark to be misogynistic. In some DVD releases the last line has been changed to, 'Sure, I know, but who wants to be alone on Halloween?'
Tags: Bugs  Bunny  censored  cartoon 
Added: 8th February 2010
Views: 3067
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Posted By: Lava1964
Benny Hill Before cable television we only had the three networks and channel 50 uhf. Then there was CBC channel 9 Windsor, Canada. Withe the Winter Olympics coming up in a few days I know what channel I'll be watching most. Channel 9 used to be only in the Windsor area now it is National. It stirred up a few people to say the least.
Tags: Benny  Hill 
Added: 10th February 2010
Views: 1871
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Posted By: Marty6697
Barbara Ann Scott Canada's Barabara Ann Scott is photographed doing a 'stag leap' in this photograph from December 1947. Two months later, at age 19, she would win the women's figure skating gold medal at the 1948 Winter Olympics in St. Moritz, Switzerland. At the opening ceremonies for the 2010 Winter Games in Vancouver, the 81-year-old Scott was one of the dignitaries who brought the Olympic flag into the stadium.
Tags: Barbara  Ann  Scott  figure  skater  Olympics 
Added: 18th February 2010
Views: 1919
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Posted By: Lava1964
Canada Wins 2010 Olympic Hockey Gold Please, my American friends, allow me to indulge in a little national pride. Canada is busy partying...
Tags: Canada  Olympic  gold  hockey 
Added: 28th February 2010
Views: 1306
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Posted By: Lava1964
1924 Canadian Olympic Hockey Team This is a photo of Canada's first Olympic hockey team. At the inaugural Winter Olympics in Chamonix, France in 1924, Canada sent a local amateur team (the Toronto Granites) to compete against the world's best. The results were horribly lopsided, to say the least: Playing three games in three days, Canada overwhelmed their Pool 'A' opponents. The Canadians thumped Czechoslovakia 30-0, Sweden 22-0, and Switzerland 33-0. In the medal round, Canada beat Great Britain 19-2 and the United States 6-1 to capture the gold medals. (Entering that final game, the Americans had outscored Belgium, France, Great Britain and Sweden by an aggregate score of 72-0.) Overall, Canada outscored its five opponents 110-3. Harry Watson scored 37 of Canada's goals. The Canadians' victory was so decisive that Canada was awarded an automatic bye into the final round at the next Winter Olympics in St. Moritz, Switzerland in 1928. None of the Canadians ever played pro hockey.
Tags: hockey  Olympics  Canada 
Added: 4th March 2010
Views: 1494
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Posted By: Lava1964
Invention of Standard Time It seems hard to believe, but not until the 1880s did North America have recognized standard time zones. Instead, each individual city generally set its own time according to the position of the sun. This system didn't cause much trouble until the railroad age blossomed--then chaos ensued. Because the clocks in cities even a few miles apart routinely varied, running a railroad became a nightmare. (For example, in Canada, Montreal was 22 minutes ahead of Toronto because it is 500 kilometres further to the northeast.) In 1879, a Scottish-born Canadian railway man, Sandford Fleming (pictured here), actively proposed time zones to simplify North American railroad schedules. These were adopted in 1883. Almost immediately, the various cities and states followed the railroaders' lead. Soon the rest of world followed too. There are now 24 basic time zones in the world, each encompassing approximately 15 degrees longitude.
Tags: standard  time  geography  Sandford  Fleming 
Added: 8th March 2010
Views: 1499
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Posted By: Lava1964
Olympic Lacrosse Lacrosse was an official medal sport in two Summer Olympics: 1904 and 1908. Canada won both 'tournaments' (if you can call them that). In 1904 at St. Louis there were only three teams competing. Two of them were Canadian. In 1908, the tourney in London consisted of one game between Canada and Great Britain. It was played more than three months after the other Olympic events had concluded! This photograph is from that game, won by Canada 14-10.
Tags: Olympic  lacrosse 
Added: 29th May 2010
Views: 1061
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Posted By: Lava1964
I Just Want To Make Music - Ken Tobias This is Ken Tobias. I posted a video last summer that Ken wrote, "Stay Awhile" by The Bells. This song is a hit he had here in Canada, released in February of 1973. I actually got Ken's blessing to post this video this afternoon. He's a cool cat. :-) Ken's photo is by Dan Culberson
Tags: ken  tobias  i  just  want  to  make  music  1973 
Added: 9th June 2010
Views: 2194
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Posted By: nbmike

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