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US Customs Seize Chocolate Treats From CBC News in Canada: A Winnipeg woman was warned and nearly fined $300 after U.S. customs officials found a Kinder Surprise chocolate egg in her vehicle, which is considered contraband south of the border. U.S. authorities have banned the popular treats because they come with a plastic toy inside that could, if eaten, choke a small child. 'It's just a chocolate egg,' Lind Bird said, who was recently stopped at the U.S. border and selected for a random search. 'They said, 'If you were caught with this across the border you would get charged a $300 fine,' she said. The U.S. takes catching illegal Kinder candy seriously, judging by the number of them they've confiscated in the last year. Officials said they've seized more than 25,000 of the treats in 2,000 separate seizures.
Tags: border  US  customs  contraband  candy 
Added: 12th January 2011
Views: 1190
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Posted By: Lava1964
Boston Bruins - 1972 Stanley Cup Champs I posted this on the CBC News website in Canada following the Boston Bruins' Stanley Cup championship on June 15, 2011. It got such a wonderful response that I thought I'd share it here too: It had been 14,279 days since captain Johnny Bucyk hoisted the Boston Bruins' last Stanley Cup on May 11, 1972. To put things in perspective... Richard Nixon was in the White House. America still had combat troops in Vietnam. If you bought a quarter's worth of candy, you could get sick eating it all. Pitchers still batted in the American League. There was no such thing as rap music or punk rock. Nobody considered the possibility of terrorist attacks at the Olympics. The NHL had 14 teams. Few players wore helmets. Some goalies didn't wear masks. Nobody seriously thought hockey players from the USSR were good. There were hardly any McDonald's Restaurants in Canada. There were very few Tim Hortons either. Archie Bunker was in his heyday. Television sets had rabbit ears. Nobody thought the world was in peril from global warming or climate change or whatever they're calling it this week. Lotteries were illegal in Canada. Arthur Godfrey Time had still been on the radio two weeks earlier. Calculators could perform four functions and cost $179. Most people had rotary telephones. Forget about DVD players--VCRs didn't exist. The idea of bottled water would have been laughable. Computers were enormous things that occupied entire rooms and did simple calculations using punch cards. Hardware meant hammers and wrenches. Software didn't mean anything. People still sent telegrams. Life Magazine was still around. Canada still had the death penalty. O.J. Simpson was a hero. The Lord's Prayer was recited in public schools. Nobody thought it was wrong. A new car cost $2500. Hockey cards were a dime a pack--and they came with pink bubble gum covered in powdered sugar. Bobby Orr was the greatest player in the NHL. (Thirty-nine years later he's still the greatest of all time.).
Tags: hockey  Boston  Bruins  1972  Stanley  Cup 
Added: 16th June 2011
Views: 3585
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Posted By: Lava1964
Stockwell Day-Doris Day Petition One of Canada's most popular homegrown TV shows is a CBC comedy program called This Hour Has 22 Minutes. One of the show's most fondly remembered moments was the "Stockwell Day Petition." The sketch aired during the 2000 Canadian federal election campaign, and consisted of a staged rant by host Rick Mercer. During that particular federal election, Stockwell Day, who was then the leader of the Canadian Alliance Party, proposed a mechanism to call for a referendum. Day proposed that a petition on ANY subject which gathered at least 350,000 signatures from voting-age citizens (about 3% of Canada's eligible voters) would automatically trigger a national referendum. Mercer decided to put Day's poorly thought out idea to the test: His "rant" asked viewers to log on to the show's website and sign an online petition demanding the Alliance Party leader change his first name to Doris--thus making him Doris Day. The show's producers claimed to have obtained in excess of 1.2 million online signatures--although there was no way of telling how many of those who signed the online petition were actually eligible voters. The stunt got huge publicity in Canada and even made some international news programs. The petition had no effect on Alliance Party policy, though, despite clearly demonstrating how absurd Day's proposal was. Day did, however, take the petition in stride. When asked about it by a reporter, Day gave a very appropriate response: "Que será, será!"
Tags: Canada  CBC  Stockwell  Day  petition 
Added: 20th June 2012
Views: 3390
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Posted By: Lava1964
New Food for 1957 - Pizza This clip from a Canadian Broadcasting Corporation program from 1957 introduces that new, exotic food--pizza!
Tags: CBC  pizza 
Added: 8th October 2012
Views: 2246
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Posted By: Lava1964
2011 Stanley Cup Riot Commentary One of the most embarrassing episodes in Canadian history: On June 15, 2011, the Boston Bruins soundly defeated the Vancouver Canucks 4-0 to win the Stanley Cup in the seventh game of the finals in Vancouver. Disappointed Canucks fans and mindless hooligans (those two terms may be interchangeable) did not accept the defeat well. They laid waste to Vancouver's downtown--much as they did in 1994 when the Canucks lost in the finals to the New York Rangers! The following night on CBC's National News, commentator Rex Murphy bluntly expressed his disgust with the rioters.
Tags: Stanley  Cup  riot  Vancouver  2011 
Added: 31st March 2013
Views: 1103
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Posted By: Lava1964
The Rutles Piggy In The Middle Many considered the Rutles' Tragical History Tour more tragic than historical. When it was broadcast on the CBC on April 1st, 1968, it was even shown upside-down. People didn't know what to make of it. I realize now that what the Rutles were saying is that we ourselves should be upside-down when we were watching it. Then it would all make sense. Hundreds of young people all over the world joined me in doing just that. We were all part of something special. In retrospect I think it was all about the peace movement. It's hard to fight when you're upside-down. Mind you, the movie still didn't make sense, but the music was amazing.
Tags: rutles  piggy  april  fools 
Added: 1st April 2013
Views: 1365
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Posted By: kinkman
Dave Hodge Pen-Flipping Incident March 14, 1987 proved to be the final day that Canadian boadcaster Dave Hodge was associated with CBC's Hockey Night In Canada broadcasts. Earlier that same day, CBC had cut away from a crucial match at the Brier (the national men's curling championship--an important event on the sports calendar in Canada) in favor of news programming, irking many Canadians. Later that night on HNIC, CBC did it again--refusing to show the five-minute overtime period between Montreal and Philadelphia to the national audience because it would have preempted the news. As is evident in this clip, Hodge famously couldn't contain his disgust with the network that had employed him for 16 years.
Tags: Dave  Hodge  HNIC  hockey  CBC  television 
Added: 17th April 2013
Views: 2363
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Posted By: Lava1964
Montreal Expos Last Home Game September 29, 2004 was a sad day for baseball fans in Canada. The Montreal Expos played their final game at home. They would relocate to the District of Columbia in 2005 and become the Washington Nationals. Some 31,000 nostalgic people showed up to see the Expos lose 9-1 to the Florida Marlins. This is a CBC News report about that last game at Olympic Stadium.
Tags: MLB  Montreal  Expos  last  home  game 
Added: 15th July 2013
Views: 1285
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Posted By: Lava1964
Bannister-Landy Miracle Mile 1954 One of the most famous track-and-field events of all time occurred on August 7, 1954. In May 1954 England's 25-year-old Roger Bannister became the first runner to record a sub-four-minute mile when he ran a 3:59.4 race at Oxford. About six weeks later, Australia's John Landy, age 24, claimed the world record by running the mile in an unheard of 3:58 flat in Finland. The two men would meet head-to-head in the British Empire Games in Vancouver in August 1954 in a race as eagerly anticipated as any in history. Landy had a reputation for establishing an insurmountable early lead in races and coasting to wins. Bannister, however, was known for possessing a strong finishing kick. This rare clip is from the CBC archives in Canada; it shows the entire race. Two things to watch: Look at how the front-running Landy constantly looks behind him to see where Bannister is. Also notice that every activity on the infield came to a standstill as all eyes were glued to the "Miracle Mile" race unfolding on the track.
Tags: Miracle  Mile  Roger  Bannister  John  Landy  Vancouver  British  Empire  Games 
Added: 12th October 2016
Views: 1522
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Posted By: Lava1964
Hockey Night in Canada - 1970 Here are the first five minutes of a Hockey Night in Canada broadcast from Toronto from February 7, 1970. The Oakland Seals are the visitors who face Toronto at Maple Leaf Gardens. The classic HNIC theme is heard. Two Molson beer commercials are shown. There's opening commentary by host Ward Cornell. P.A. announcer Paul Harris instructs the crowd to rise for the national anthem. An instrumental version of O Canada is played. Play-by-play man Bill Hewitt sets the scene...and the puck is dropped.
Tags: Hockey  Night  in  Canada  Ward  Cornell  CBC 
Added: 3rd May 2017
Views: 1047
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Posted By: Lava1964

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