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John Hughes Tribute A spokeswoman for John Hughes says the director of 1980s coming-of-age films like "Sixteen Candles" and "The Breakfast Club" has died in Manhattan. Michelle Bega says the 59-year-old Hughes died of a heart attack during a morning walk. He was in Manhattan to visit family. He made a teen star of Molly Ringwald with 1984's "Sixteen Candles" about a girl's nightmarish birthday on the eve of her sister's wedding. Ringwald also starred in "The Breakfast Club," about a group of high school misfits during Saturday detention, and "Pretty in Pink." Hughes also directed "Ferris Bueller's Day Off" and wrote "Home Alone." He lived in Illinois and set many of his films in the Chicago area.
Tags: John  Hughes  Tribute  john  hughes  death    john  hughes  tribute    breakfast  club    weird  science    john    hughes    dead 
Added: 6th August 2009
Views: 1366
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Posted By: Cliffy
Gabriel Melgar - Replacement Chico Chico and the Man was a hit sitcom for NBC in the mid-1970s. Starring Freddie Prinze and Jack Albertson, the show debuted in 1974 and centered on the relationship between crusty, aging widower Ed Brown (a "seventh-generation WASP" whose garage was the last white-owned business in his Los Angeles neighborhood) and his Mexican-American employee Francisco (Chico) Rodriguez. Chico and The Man was a regular fixture in the top 10 until Prinze's shocking suicide at age 22 in January 1977. Enough shows with Prinze had been made in advance to last several weeks. The remaining episodes of the 1976-77 season focused on minor cast members. Common sense dictated that NBC should cancel the show, but instead a revamped Chico and the Man debuted in the fall of 1977. Twelve-year-old Gabriel Melgar was cast as illegal-immigrant orphan Raul Garcia who had stowed away in Ed Brown's car when he was returning from a fishing trip to Mexico. Brown referred to Raul as "Chico," explaining to the boy, "You're all Chicos to me!" Prinze's character was said to be visiting relatives in Mexico. However, in one episode Raul finds Chico's belongings in a closet and starts to play his guitar. Ed has an emotional meltdown, smashes the guitar, and eventually explains to Raul that Chico had died. Ratings for the revised version of Chico and the Man were terrible, so the show was axed at the end of the 1977-78 season. Melgar didn't do much in showbiz after the cancellation of Chico and the Man. He appeared in one episode of CHiPs, one episode of Love Boat, and he had a role in a forgettable 1979 action flick titled Jaguar Lives--and that was it. According to one fansite, Melgar is now employed in the biomedical field.
Tags: Chico  and  the  Man  Gabriel  Melgar 
Added: 4th March 2014
Views: 4373
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Posted By: Lava1964
Balloon-Style Chest Protectors Baseball umpires wore variations of the outside chest protector for about 80 years. In the major leagues, National League umpires made the transistion to inside protectors several years before their American League counterparts. The result was that NL umps generally called lower strikes because they tended to squat lower behind the catcher. After 1977, the American League mandated that all new arbiters wear inside protectors, but veteran umps could retain their balloons. The last umpire in the big leagues to wear an outside protector was Jerry Neudecker. He retired after the 1985 season.
Tags: umpires  balloon  chest  protector 
Added: 13th August 2009
Views: 10463
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Posted By: Lava1964
Les Paul and Mary Ford How High the Moon Not only did Les Paul invent the electric guitar but also "over sampling" an editing trick that made the sound even bigger.
Tags: les    paul    mary    ford    how    high    the    moon    alternative    blues    classical    country    electronic    folk    hip-hop    indie    jazz    world    music    unsigned    soul    rock    rap    r&b    pop    religious     
Added: 15th August 2009
Views: 10164
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Posted By: Old Fart
Charley Chase - Forgotten Comedian One of the overlooked comedy greats from the silent-screen era was Charley Chase. Chase began working in films at age 19 in 1912 and was still amusing audiences well into the sound era. Chase performed in comedies under Mack Sennett at Keystone but he is more famous for his long association with Hal Roach Studios. Chase often played a luckless character who was frequently the victim of unfortunate circumstances. Wrote one film historian, "Charley Chase was always innocent--but he got caught anyway." Often the setup to Chase's film gags was long and complex. Consider this clip from the 1924 film Accidental Accidents. Sadly, Chase died of a heart attack in 1940 at the age of 46.
Tags: Charley  Chase  silen  film  comedian 
Added: 7th March 2014
Views: 1399
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Posted By: Lava1964
First Goalie Mask - 1929 In 1929 Clint Benedict of the Montreal Maroons became the first goalie to wear a mask in a National Hockey League game. Benedict had suffered a broken nose in a previous game. To continue playing, Benedict commissioned a Boston leather goods company to make an experimental mask for him. The novelty didn't last very long--just one game. Benedict said the contraption obscured his view on low shots. New York Ranger goalie Charlie Rayner wore a partial mask for a few games in 1947 to protect a broken jaw, but he too complained of impaired vision and discarded it. Another dozen years would pass before NHL goalie Jacques Plante ushered in the modern goalie mask in 1959.
Tags: Clint  Benedict  goalie  mask 
Added: 15th August 2009
Views: 5014
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Posted By: Lava1964
Dance Marathon Craze During the 1920s and 1930s, dance marathons were a popular diversion in the United States. It is estimated that at their pinnacle, dance marathons were the main source of livelihood for 20,000 frequent competitors, officials, promoters, and musicians. Rules varied from place to place, but generally a couple stayed in the running for cash prizes as long as they kept moving on the dance floor. Only short respites were allowed every few hours for meals and rests. One event in New York City in 1937 lasted 481 hours--slightly more than 20 days! By the late 1930s, several cities and states had outlawed dance marathons because of the health dangers that accompanied sleep deprivation. This colorized photo from 1925 shows a typically exhausted couple.
Tags: dance  marathons 
Added: 16th August 2009
Views: 2072
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Posted By: Lava1964
Charlie and Co. Not a complete sequence here but this is the opening for the CBS TV series Charlie & Co which starred singer Gladys Knight and Flip Wilson. It aired on Wednesday nights(13 eps) at 9PM during the 1985-6 season running for 18 episodes. The show ended it's run on Friday nights(4 eps) after a 1 episode run on Tuesday...
Tags: Charlie  and  Co  Gladys  Knight  Flip  WIlson 
Added: 16th August 2009
Views: 1603
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Posted By: EONSFTFAN
Name The Chick pretty easy, i know . .but i LOVE anything 60's!
Tags: trivia 
Added: 16th August 2009
Views: 2281
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Posted By: Teresa
Worst MLB Team - 1916 Athletics The 1927 New York Yankees are usually considered by baseball history buffs to be the greatest MLB team ever assembled. But which team was the worst? My choice for the worst baseball team (of the 20th century, at least) goes to the pitiful 1916 Philadelphia Athletics. They finished at the bottom of the American League standings that year with an awful 36-117-1 record. What makes the A's horrendous showing so remarkable was that Philadelphia had won the American League in pennant in 1910, 1911, 1913 and 1914--and the World Series in three of those seasons. However, the A's were stunningly upset by the Boston Braves in the 1914 World Series. Miffed owner/manager Connie Mack quickly dismantled his superb team and attempted to restock it with castoffs and college hopefuls. The A's finished last seven years in a row before rebuilding their dynasty in the late 1920s. The 1916 Athletics are of particular interest to me because I'm a co-author of the book shown here: A's Bad As It Gets. (Blame my publisher for the punny title.) It is now available through McFarland Publishers or it can be purchased online via Amazon. Trust me: if you're a baseball fan you'll enjoy it! After the huge number of posts I've made on this website over the years (nearly 2,700) for everyone's enjoyment, I figure I'm entitled to one shameless, self-promoting commercial announcement.
Tags: baseball  1916  Philadelphia  Athletics 
Added: 16th March 2014
Views: 1350
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Posted By: Lava1964

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