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Kenny Nolan - I Like Dreamin From the January 22, 1977 edition of American Bandstand, Kenny Nolan (sort of) sings his hit song I Like Dreamin'. He's obviously lip-synching it, but who cares? It's such a great, romantic song.
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Added: 12th January 2018
Views: 1200
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Posted By: Lava1964
Black Tom Explosion 1916 Even though the United States was neutral nation in 1916, it was still occasionally affected by acts of war. The most notable to happen on land was the Black Tom explosion on July 30, 1916, in Jersey City, NJ. It was an act of sabotage by German agents to destroy American-made munitions that were to be supplied to the Allies in the First World War. Black Tom was originally a man-made island constructed around a large black rock in New York Harbor that was a well-known hazard to naval navigation. It was eventually connected by the Lehigh Valley Railroad to the mainland and was absorbed into Jersey City. It became a major munitions depot even before the war. Shortly after midnight on July 30, 1916, a series of small fires was discovered on the pier. Some guards tried to fight the fires while others fled, fearing an explosion. They had good reason to fear such a calamity as 2 million pounds of explosives and small arms were stored on Black Tom Island awaiting shipment to Czarist Russia. The feared explosion came; actually there were several explosions. The first and biggest occurred at 2:08 a.m. It had the force of an earthquake measuring 5.5 on the Richter scale. Flying fragments caused more than $100,000 in damages to the Statue of Liberty on its gown and torch. (To date, the torch has never been reopened to the public.) Windows 25 miles were shattered and the explosion was felt as far away as Philadelphia. Four people were definitely killed by the blast--including an infant. Some sources claim the fatality total was seven. Blame originally was directed at Black Tom Island watchmen who had lit small smudge-pot fires to drive away mosquitoes, but they were quickly absolved of blame when the true nature of the fires showed obvious evidence of arson. German saboteurs were blamed for the incident which caused $20 million in damages. The Leigh Valley Railroad successfully sued the German government after the war but had no success in collecting any compensation until 1953 when the West German government agreed to pay $95 million. The final payment was made in 1979.
Tags: Black  Tom  Explosion  1916  German  sabotage 
Added: 13th January 2018
Views: 1295
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Posted By: Lava1964
Forgotten TV Show - Cades County During the 1971-72 TV season, Glenn Ford was offered a series by CBS. Originally CBS preferred Ford do a sitcom, but then realized Ford was more associated with Hollywood westerns than any other genre. Thus Ford starred in the hour-long series called Cade's County. In it, Ford played Sam Cade, the sheriff of Madrid County somewhere in the American southwest. Edgar Buchanan (of Petticoat Junction fame) played senior deputy J.J. Jackson. The show's plots were a combination of police mysteries and western adventures. Cade's County ran on Sundays at 9 p.m. opposite Bonanza on NBC and ABC's Sunday Night Movie. It fared poorly in the ratings and, after 24 episodes, was not renewed for a second season. Here's the opening montage. (The theme song was composed by Henry Mancini.)
Tags: Cades  County  Glenn  Ford  TV  series  CBS 
Added: 19th February 2018
Views: 1024
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Posted By: Lava1964
The Second Hundred Years - Sitcom Flop The 1960s were famous for producing far-fetched sitcoms. Here is another that aired briefly on ABC: The Second Hundred Years. Starring Monte Markham and Arthur O'Connell, its crazy plot had O'Connell playing Edwin Carpenter, a man whose gold-prospecting father (Luke) was swept by an avalanche into an Alaskan glacier in 1900. Another avalanche 67 years later conveniently exposed Luke's frozen carcass. Miraculously he was revived--without having aged in the intervening years! Thus Luke now physically resembled his 33-year-old grandson, Ken. (Luke and Ken were played by the same actor, of course, Monte Markham.) Furthermore, for national security reasons, the general public was not allowed to know about this remarkable incident. The show's plots frequently focused on Ken and Luke being able to take the other's place in social situations, and in the culture shock Luke experienced in suddenly going from 1900 to 1967. (In one episode Luke saw a go-go dancer in a cage, thought she was being held against her will, and "rescued" her.) The Second Hundred Years premiered on September 3, 1967 to fairly strong ratings, but it was universally panned by TV critics. Within a very short time it dropped into the bottom 25 network shows and was cancelled after 26 episodes. Here is a promotional clip that aired on ABC just before its premier.
Tags: Monte  Markham  The  Second  Hundred  Years  sitcom  Arthur  O 
Added: 5th April 2018
Views: 1043
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Posted By: Lava1964
Fair Exchange - Failed Sitcom In September 1962 CBS unveiled something new--an hour-long sitcom titled Fair Exchange. Its premise was that an American family and a British family swapped teenage daughters for a year. Why? The two families' patriarchs had been Second World War flying buddies. The American daughter, Patty Walker, wanted to study in London, so the two families, in effect, arranged their own version of an exchange student program. (Judy Carne played the English teen, Heather Finch. It was her first American television role. Even though she played a teenager, Carne was 23 years old at the time.) The episodes generally focused on the difficulties each girl had adopting to the cultural differences of her new location. Filmed in both England and Hollywood, the 60-minute format proved too unwieldy and the show was canceled in December 1962. Three months later, after loyal fans put pressure on CBS, the network returned Fair Exchange to its schedule--but only in a revised half-hour format. Ratings did not merit the show continuing beyond one season, however. Fair Exchange was again cancelled before the 1963-64 TV season began after 27 episodes. Here is the opening montage for the 60-minute version.
Tags: Fair  Exchange  sitcom  Judy  Carne  CBS 
Added: 26th April 2018
Views: 991
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Posted By: Lava1964
Jack Dempsey on WML 1965 I posted this clip years ago, but its source is no longer available--so here it is again: From July 1965, former world heavyweight champion Jack Dempsey is the mystery guest on What's My Line? He had recently turned 70 years old--and still looked like he could fight his way out of any trouble. In fact, he would. At about this time two punks tried to mug the grand old champ near his Broadway restaurant. Dempsey flattened them both.
Tags: Jack  Dempsey  Whats  My  Line 
Added: 12th July 2018
Views: 791
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Posted By: Lava1964
my old Father this is a 1919, comic strip re-print book. .i had NO IDEA it had been around this long: "Bringing Up Father" was a comic strip created by George McManus that ran from January 12, 1913 to May 28, 2000. Most readers, however, called it Maggie and Jiggs, after its two main characters. The strip was about an Irishman named Jiggs living in the United States who comes into wealth but still wants to keep his old pals, eat corned beef and cabbage (sometimes called Jiggs dinner), and hang out at the tavern, much to the consternation of his wife, Maggie, a social climber.
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Added: 28th May 2018
Views: 912
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Posted By: hieund
Mickey Mantle Avoids DP - 1960 WS This is one of the smartest baserunning plays you'll ever see: It's Game #7 of the 1960 World Series. The New York Yankees are trailing the Pittsburgh Pirates by one run (9-8) with one out in the top of the ninth inning. Gil McDougald is on third base. Mickey Mantle is on first base. Yogi Berra hits a sharp ground ball to Pittsburgh first baseman Rocky Nelson. Nelson steps on first base for the second out of the inning. Mickey Mantle appears to be a dead duck for the Series-ending out, but with the force play now removed, he dives back into first base, eluding the surprised Nelson's tag. McDougald scored the game-tying run. (As any baseball fan worth his salt knows, the Pirates won the game in the bottom of the ninth inning when Bill Mazeroski led off with a home run.)
Tags: Mickey  Mantle  baserunning  baseball  1960  World  Series 
Added: 29th July 2018
Views: 967
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Posted By: Lava1964
1972 World Series - McRae Flattens Green World Series baseball when men were men: It's Game #4 of the 1972 World Series. Cincinnati's Hal McRae is forced out at second base, but he makes sure A's infielder Dick Green won't turn a double play. Yes, McRae's maneuver was completely legal at the time.
Tags: 1972  World  Series  Hal  McRae 
Added: 25th June 2018
Views: 934
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Posted By: Lava1964
Russian Coronation Free Beer Riot - 1896 On Tuesday, May 26, 1896, the elaborate coronation of Czar Nicholas II of Russia occurred in Moscow before an enormous crowd of onlookers. The following day, May 27, to celebrate the new emperor's reign, a massive party was scheduled for the general public. It was to be a large festival with free food, beer, and souvenir cups. The site chosen for the party was Khodynka Field outside Moscow, a venue normally used for military exercises. Khodynka was selected as it was the only place near Moscow large enough to hold the enormous number of citizens who would likely attend. Before the food and drink was handed out, rumors spread that there would not be enough for everyone. As a result, much of the crowd stampeded to get their share. Individuals were tripped and trampled upon. Many hapless onlookers suffocated in the dirt of the field. Of the estimated 100,000 people gathered for the party, 1,389 individuals died and roughly another 1,300 were injured. The Khodynka Tragedy, as it came to be known, was seen as an ill omen for the new czar. Furthermore, the Czar was badly advised to attend a ball on the evening of the catastrophe hosted by the French ambassador to Russia. Nicholas privately wished to observe a period of prayer and mourning for the dead, but his advisors and relatives insisted that he would damage critical Russian-French relations if he did not attend the ball. The decision was seen as callous by many Russian peasants who perceived Nicholas to be frivolous and uncaring toward his subjects.
Tags: Russian  history  Czar  Nicholas  coronation  royalty 
Added: 1st July 2018
Views: 1815
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Posted By: Lava1964

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