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Buster Brown Shoes oh, i have a HORRIBLE story to share with you about Buster Browns!! YEA, HUH? When my Dad was little, his Uncle gave him a little goat . . (that's the good part) they were very poor and it was time for Dad to get a new outfit. They didn't have any money, so HIS MOTHER sold the goat unbeknownst to my Dad . . Daddy came home with this incredibly uncomfortable Buster Brown outfit . . and THEN couldn't find his little knot-headed buddy!! Of all the nerve!! Bothered him all his life . . So one year for Christmas, i got him a life-sized carved goat that a 'fellow' whittled out of wood, and i put it outside the picture window at my parent's house with a big red bow on it. On Christmas morning when my sister and I got down there (now in our 40's) and we had opened all our presents, i went and opened the curtains . .TA DA!! Dad was THRILLED . .Mom is STILL mad because it's an eye sore!! LOL
Tags: ad  Buster  Brown 
Added: 19th November 2007
Views: 2152
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Posted By: Teresa
Eddie Gaedel Midget Pinch Hitter Probably my favorite sports story is the day a midget, Eddie Gaedel, batted in a major league game. The date was August 19, 1951. The lacklustre St. Louis Browns were hosting the Detroit Tigers in a Sunday doubleheader. Browns' owner Bill Veeck promised that anyone who bought a ticket would see a memorable sight. He was right. Gaedel, all 3'7" of him, took part in a brewery promotion between games. Gaedel, clad it a batboy's uniform bearing the number 1/8 and carrying a toy bat, made baseball history in the first inning of the second game when he batted for outfielder Frank Saucier. Bob Cain, the Detroit pitcher, nearly doubled over in laughter at the sight of Gaedel and walked him on four pitches--all of them high. Once Gaedel trotted down to first base he was replaced by pinch runner Jim Delsing. Gaedel's picture appeared in virtually every newspaper in North America the next day. That same day American League president Will Harridge banned midgets from baseball. Most of the players involved in the stunt relished their connection to it. Jim Delsing said, 'A lot of guys have hit 50 home runs in a season, but I'm the only guy who ever ran for a midget.'
Tags: Eddie  Gaedel  baseball 
Added: 22nd November 2007
Views: 5048
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Posted By: Lava1964
Pete Gray One-Armed Ballplayer During the Second World War, most able-bodied young American males were in the armed forces. That left the old and the infirmed to play pro baseball. The most obvious example of this was Pete Gray who played in 77 games in his lone major league season for the St. Louis Browns. The one-armed outfielder batted .218 in 1945.
Tags: Pete  Gray  one-armed  ballplayer 
Added: 14th March 2009
Views: 2088
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Posted By: Lava1964
The Browns--The Three Bells The Three Bells
Tags: The  Three  Bells  The  Browns 
Added: 6th July 2009
Views: 2393
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Posted By: Carl1957
Tenspeed And Brownshoe Opening Tags: Tenspeed  And  Brownshoe  Opening     
Added: 29th April 2011
Views: 1363
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Posted By: Cliffy
Baseballs Lost Teams This is an informative short feature about three MLB teams that were in existence for half a century but found new homes in the 1950s: the St. Louis Browns, the Boston Braves, and the Philadelphia Athletics.
Tags: MLB  lost  teams  defunct 
Added: 2nd January 2014
Views: 1752
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Posted By: Lava1964
Buth Ruth Final Public Appearance According to a popular myth (perpetuated by New York Yankees fans), Babe Ruth's final appearance at a ballpark was in Yankee Stadium on Babe Ruth Day on June 13, 1948 where the terminally ill Bambino put on the pinstripes one last time and addressed a huge, subdued crowd in a croaky, cancer-ravaged voice. It makes for a fitting end to Babe Ruth's days as a public figure, but it wasn't so. Ruth's final public appearance actually occurred six days later at Sportsman's Park in St. Louis when the lowly Browns hosted the Yankees in a Saturday game. The ailing Ruth failed to create much excitement that day: The paid attendance was under 6,000. Ruth made a short, raspy speech and posed for this photo flanked by kids who had descended from the ballpark's grandstand. Ruth died two months later, on August 16, 1948. He was 53.
Tags: baseball  Babe  Ruth  Yankees  myth 
Added: 13th May 2012
Views: 4327
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Posted By: Lava1964
Collyer Brothers - Famous NYC Recluses On March 21, 1947, New York City police received an anonymous telephone call reporting a dead body at the Collyer home in what was once a fashionable section of Harlem. The brownstone house was shared by Homer and Langley Collyer, two brothers who gained a measure of celebrity for living like hermits in New York City. The sons of a physician, the Collyer brothers were once prominent and productive citizens. Homer, the older sibling, was an admiralty lawyer. Langley was a concert pianist. Both were Sunday school instructors. Upon the deaths of their parents, though, the brothers shut off themselves from the outside world. They stopped paying taxes and lived without utilities for nearly 30 years. Homer went blind due to hemorrhages and later became paralyzed. Langley became Homer's caregiver. He cooked food on a portable kerosene stove and carried water in buckets from a public park four blocks away. Langley also became a notorious pack rat and scrounger. Venturing out of his house only in the dead of night, he'd shop for whatever food he needed for the day and pick up discarded items of all sorts. He retained newspapers for years so that Homer could catch up on his reading once he regained his sight. He occasionally befriended newspaper reporters who wrote stories about the reclusive Collyer brothers. Langley often fed Homer 100 oranges per week in the hope it would help him regain his eyesight. Fearful of burglars, Langley turned the Collyer house into a maze of pathways and crawl spaces amid the numerous junk and refuse that collected in the house. He built booby-traps to ensnare potential intruders. Based on the anonymous phone tip in March 1947, police broke into the Collyer home and found Homer, clad in a tattered robe, dead in a chair from malnutrition. Nearly a month went by before Langley was found amid the 140 tons of items that had been piled haphazardly throughout the house. Langley's body was found by sanitation workers under a mountain of debris only about 10 feet from where Homer's body had been found. Police theorized that Langley had accidentally tripped one of his own booby-traps and died of suffocation. Helpless and with no one to care for him, Homer slowly died of starvation about two weeks later. Among the wide variety of items found in the Collyer house were 14 pianos, most of a Model T Ford, tons of newspapers, thousands of law books, sexy pin-up posters circa 1910, dressmakers' dummies, unopened mail, 34 passbooks for various bank accounts, and unused tickets to a church function from 1905.
Tags: Collyer  brothers  pack  rats  hermits  NYC 
Added: 7th October 2014
Views: 1911
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Posted By: Lava1964

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