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Connie Mack 1927 Baseball scholars will recognize the man on the cover of Time Magazine as Connie Mack, baseball's grand patriarch and most enduring manager. Born Cornelius McGillicuddy, Mack, a former catcher, managed the Pittsburgh Pirates for three seasons (1894 thorugh 1896) and the Philadelphia Athletics for 50 seasons (1901 through 1950) for the astonishing total of 7,755 games managed! The fact that he owned the Athletics ensured he never got fired. His teams fluctuated from greatness to ineptitude largely because he was reluctant to pay big salaries to keep his star players. (His 1931 Athletics won 107 of 154 games. In contrast, Mack's 1916 Athletics won just 36 games.) Mack never wore a uniform on the bench, always a business suit. Much beloved by the baseball establishment, Mack was once quoted as saying he preferred his teams to start well but finish in fourth place. That way he would make a profit for the season but his players couldn't demand raises!
Tags: Connie  Mack  baseball 
Added: 16th November 2007
Views: 2544
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Posted By: Lava1964
1931 World Series Program This attractive baseball program is from the 1931 World Series. That Fall Classic was a rematch of the 1930 World Series. It pitted the Philadelphia Athletics versus the St. Louis Cardinals. The A's had won the World Series in 1929 and 1930, but the Cards took the '31 tilt in seven games. According to the hand-written notation, this program is from Game Five which was played on October 7 at Philadelphia's Shibe Park. The Cardinals only had one major lineup change from 1930: a 27-year-old rookie outfielder named Pepper Martin. Had there been a World Series MVP award in 1931, Martin would have won it. He led the Cards in several offensive categories--including stolen bases. Martin also made a crucial running catch to snuff out a ninth-inning Philadelphia rally in Game Seven. This was the last World Series appearance by the Philadelphia A's. The next time the Athletics appeared in a World Series was in 1972 when they were the Oakland A's.
Tags: 1931  World  Series  program  baseball 
Added: 25th November 2009
Views: 2478
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Posted By: Lava1964
Ty Cobb Steals Third Base This is a terrific action photo snapped by famed baseball photographer Charles Conlon that is nearly 100 years old! (Some sources date the photo to 1909; others claim it was taken in 1910.) Ty Cobb of the Detroit Tigers steals third base. Jimmy Austin of the Philadelphia Athletics is the third baseman. Austin was upended by Cobb's hard slide. Notice there's no uniform number on Austin's back. They did not come into vogue until the late 1920s.
Tags: Ty  Cobb  Jimmy  Austin  baseball  photo 
Added: 10th August 2008
Views: 1780
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Posted By: Lava1964
Press Sisters Gender Controversy Tamara and Irina Press, two sisters from the old Soviet Union, were dominant in women's athletics during the early 1960s. Tamara (pictured here) was virtually unbeatable in shot put. Irina was an excellent pentathlete and a world-record holder in the 80-metre hurdles. The trouble was they didn't look too feminine. Speculation about the sisters' true gender was always present. Some western sports journalists began secretly referring to the Press sisters as the 'Press brothers.' When the governing body of European athletics began instituting gender testing in 1966, instead of complying, the Press sisters vanished from international competition--never to return. Soviet newspapers reported that they had retired from sports to tend to their ailing mother. When Irina died in 2004, several months went by before her death was officially announced.
Tags: Press  sisters  gender 
Added: 23rd August 2008
Views: 6180
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Posted By: Lava1964
Shibe Park Another one of baseball's famous stadiums that is no longer standing: Shibe Park in Philadelphia. Built in 1909, it was the home of the American League's Philadelphia Athletics until the team relocated to Kansas City in 1955. The park underwent one name change in its history. It was renamed Connie Mack Stadium to honor the longtime owner and manager of the A's. The National League's Phillies became the tenants after the A's left Philadelphia. It was their home ballpark until 1970.
Tags: Shibe  Park  Connie  Mack  Stadium 
Added: 19th December 2008
Views: 1600
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Posted By: Lava1964
Worst MLB Team - 1916 Athletics The 1927 New York Yankees are usually considered by baseball history buffs to be the greatest MLB team ever assembled. But which team was the worst? My choice for the worst baseball team (of the 20th century, at least) goes to the pitiful 1916 Philadelphia Athletics. They finished at the bottom of the American League standings that year with an awful 36-117-1 record. What makes the A's horrendous showing so remarkable was that Philadelphia had won the American League in pennant in 1910, 1911, 1913 and 1914--and the World Series in three of those seasons. However, the A's were stunningly upset by the Boston Braves in the 1914 World Series. Miffed owner/manager Connie Mack quickly dismantled his superb team and attempted to restock it with castoffs and college hopefuls. The A's finished last seven years in a row before rebuilding their dynasty in the late 1920s. The 1916 Athletics are of particular interest to me because I'm a co-author of the book shown here: A's Bad As It Gets. (Blame my publisher for the punny title.) It is now available through McFarland Publishers or it can be purchased online via Amazon. Trust me: if you're a baseball fan you'll enjoy it! After the huge number of posts I've made on this website over the years (nearly 2,700) for everyone's enjoyment, I figure I'm entitled to one shameless, self-promoting commercial announcement.
Tags: baseball  1916  Philadelphia  Athletics 
Added: 16th March 2014
Views: 1302
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Posted By: Lava1964
1911 World Series Scorecard In the early days of baseball, stadium scoreboards were sometimes non-existent or inadequate. Fans who wanted to keep well informed at the game had to keep score themselves. Thus personal scorecards were required equipment. (Of course they were sold at the ballpark.) Here's one from the 1911 World Series sold at the Polo Grounds in New York City. The Philadelphia Athletics beat the New York Giants in six games in the 1911 Fall Classic. Giants' owner John T. Brush is pictured on the scorecard.
Tags: 1911  World  Series  scorecard  baseball 
Added: 28th November 2009
Views: 1685
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Posted By: Lava1964
First MLB All-Star Game 1933 The first MLB All-Star Game was played n 1933. Arch Ward, the Chicago Tribune's sports editor, came up with the idea for the game. It was to coincide with the celebration of the cityís 'Century of Progress' Exposition. By the 1930s, baseball had already established itself as Americaís favorite pastime and the national exposition provided the perfect stage to introduce baseballís best to the rest of the country. The game was originally conceived as a single, one-time event to help lift the spirits of the country during the Great Depression. However, its enormous popularity made the All-Star Game an annual event. That first All-Star Game was played on July 6, 1933 at Comiskey Park in Chicago on a day when both leagues had no games scheduled. Retired Giants' manager John McGraw was chosen to manage the National League team, while Philadelphia Athletics' manager Connie Mack led the American League team. More than 47,000 fans attended. There was one player in particular who excited fans and players alike. 'We wanted to see the Babe,' said NL starting pitcher Bill Hallahan. 'Sure, he was old and had a big waistline, but that didnít make any difference. We were on the same field as Babe Ruth.' (The National League team is shown in the photo below.) The first run was scored in the second inning, when AL starting pitcher Lefty Gomez drove in Jimmie Dykes with a single. In the next inning, Ruth gave the fans what they came to see--a two-run homer into the right-field stands. The crowd 'roared in acclamation' for the homer, according to Baseball Almanac. The AL went on the win the game 4-2, bolstered by Ruthís home run, Jimmy Dykes' two hits, and seven innings of two-run pitching by Lefty Gomez, who got credit for the win. The National League was led by the 'Fordham Flash,' Frankie Frisch of the St. Louis Cardinals, who had two hits (including a home run) and two hits by Bill Terry, the first baseman of the New York Giants.
Tags: baseball  all-star  game 
Added: 11th July 2010
Views: 1618
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Posted By: Lava1964
Home Run Baker John Franklin Baker was the Philadelphia Athletics' third baseman during their glory years of the early 1910s. Baker first led the American League in home runs in 1911 and earned the nickname 'Home Run' during the 1911 World Series versus the New York Giants. In that series he hit a go-ahead homer off Rube Marquard in game two, and a ninth-inning game-tying homer off Christy Mathewson in game three. His 1911 home run crown would be the first of four consecutive seasons leading the American League. His home run totals during the dead-ball era were modest: He hit 11 in 1911, 10 in 1912, 12 in 1913, and nine home runs in 1914. His career home run total is just 48--a clear indication that home runs were a rarity in the 'dead ball era.'
Tags: baseball  Home  Run  Baker 
Added: 19th July 2010
Views: 1444
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Posted By: Lava1964
Four MLB Greats - 1928 This impromptu photo shows Lou Gehrig, Tris Speaker, Ty Cobb, and Babe Ruth before a New York Yankees-Philadelphia Athletics game in 1928. The photo may have been taken on Opening Day; the heavy jackets worn by Gehrig and Ruth suggest a cool temperature. Not a bad core of players to start a team, I'd say! (Imagine what their salaries would be today!) The A's gave the Yankees a darn good run for the AL pennant in 1928 but came up just a bit short, winning 98 games and finishing in second spot just 2.5 games out of first place. The Yankees took 16 of 22 games versus the A's in 1928. Speaker and Cobb were both winding down their spectacular careers that season. Some baseball scholars believe their advancing ages--they were both in their forties--may have been a hindrance to the A's. Speaker could no longer play center field effectively. He was used mostly as a pinch hitter by the middle of July and appeared in no games at all after August. The Athletics' younger stars (fellows like Al Simmons, Mickey Cochrane, and Lefty Grove) led them to three straight AL pennants from 1929 through 1931.
Tags: MLB  Cobb,  Ruth,  Speaker,  Gehrig 
Added: 9th December 2014
Views: 1229
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Posted By: Lava1964

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