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Yalta Conference 1945 The fate of postwar Europe was decided in 1945 at the Soviet Union resort city of Yalta on the Crimean Sea. With Nazi Germany on the verge of defeat, the leaders of the three major Allied combatant nations met to decide the fate of Germany and eastern Europe. Franklin Roosevelt is visibly ill and weary from the long journey. The British Empire is in decline and Winston Churchill can no longer assert any strength. By default Josef Stalin is given free rein to deal with matters in eastern Europe. The Cold War was about to begin.
Tags: Yalta  Conference  1945 
Added: 9th February 2008
Views: 2072
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Posted By: Lava1964
We Will Meet Again - WWII Song Along with Lili Marlene, We'll Meet Again, sung by Vera Lynn in the 1940's, were the most popular song(s) of the Allied soldiers during WWII. (My father was constantly singing it for 40 years after the war ended). Here is the song reprised by 29 year old Welsh mezzo-soprano, Katherine Jenkins. (She does not look very much like an opera singer). She has embraced the causes of English veterans of WWII to those presently serving in the Middle East. She performs concerts all over the U.K. for the vets and troops on active duty, along with maintaining the rigorous schedule of an opera singer. She radiates the very essence of the English girl. You will probably know the tune and join in, singing with the crowd at this Cardiff concert. The song is at once, melodic, uplifting, and nostalgic.
Tags: Vera  Lynn  We  Will  Meet  Again  WWII  song  veterans 
Added: 10th September 2009
Views: 4154
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Posted By: Watersnake
D-Day Crossword Puzzle Security Breach In the spring of 1944 the Allies were poised to land in German-occupied France. The only uncertainty was where and when. Tight security over the enormous operation was paramount. (One American general was demoted and sent back to the Unites States for merely speculating on an invasion date at a social gathering.) Accordingly, British Intelligence was aghast when several key code names linked to the D-Day invasion began appearing as answers in the Daily Telegraph crossword puzzles in the month before the June 6 invasion. The code names of all five beaches (Gold, Sword, Juno, Omaha, Utah), the portable harbors (Mulberry), the naval support (Neptune), and the entire operation (Overlord) appeared! Agents questioned Leonard Dawe, a 54-year-old local schoolmaster, who had submitted the puzzles. Dawe didn't know what the fuss was about. He told the agents the words simply fit the puzzles. For years the incident was regarded as a remarkable coincidence. However, in 1984, one of Dawe's former students at the Strand School shed more light on the subject. Ronald French, who was 14 in 1944, said Dawe routinely had his students fill in crossword grids as a mental exercise. Dawe kept the especially good grids, wrote accompanying clues, and submitted them to the Daily Telegraph. The boys often socialized with the Allied troops stationed nearby and likely acquired the words by overhearing their conversations. There is no evidence that Dawe was a German agent, nor is there any evidence that the Germans benefitted from this odd security breach.
Tags: crossword  puzzle  D-Day  WWII  security 
Added: 25th November 2009
Views: 4353
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Posted By: Lava1964
Japanese Skull Controversy This odd photograph was published in the May 22, 1944 issue of Life magazine. It shows the girlfriend of an American soldier writing her beau a thank-you note for sending her part of the skull from a dead Japanese soldier. The photo inspired overwhelmingly negative reposnses from Life readers. Furthermore, it was a propaganda bonanza for the Japanese who used it to portray Allied servicemen as barbaric. Indeed, the mistreatment of enemy corpses was outlawed by the Geneva Convention in 1929. The soldier who mailed the partial skull stateside was reprimanded.
Tags: skull  Second  World  War  Japanese 
Added: 1st April 2010
Views: 4772
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Posted By: Lava1964
Rocky Marciano Punch Photo One of my favorite sports photographs: Challenger Rocky Marciano lands a solid right hand on champ Jersey Joe Walcott's jaw during their September 23, 1952 world heavyweight title fight in Philadelphia. Trailing on the scorecards, Marciano rallied to win by a 13th-round kayo. Many people wrongly assume this was the knockout punch; it wasn't. Walcott was along the ropes when Marciano caught him with the fateful blow.
Tags: Rocky  Marciano  boxing  Jersey  Joe  Walcott 
Added: 2nd December 2010
Views: 3802
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Posted By: Lava1964
Rick Martin 1951-2011 Hockey fans were saddened to hear of the passing of Rick Martin, 59, one of the National Hockey League's most lethal snipers during the 1970s. The popular and fun-loving Martin combined with Gilbert Perreault and Rene Robert to form the high-scoring French Connection line that led the Buffalo Sabres to the Stanley Cup finals in 1975. According to media reports, Martin was felled by a heart attack while driving alone in the Buffalo suburb of Clarence, NY on Sunday, March 13, 2011. Witnesses say they saw the car's driver, later identified as Martin, keel over at the wheel. His car crossed the center line, crashed into a utility pole, and slid into a tree. Bystanders and police attempted to revive Martin to no avail. In an NHL career that totalled 685 regular-season games from 1971 to 1981, Martin scored 384 goals and added 317 assists. In 63 playoff games, Martin tallied 24 goals and collected 29 assists.
Tags: hockey  Rick  Martin  Buffalo  Sabres  death 
Added: 13th March 2011
Views: 1221
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Posted By: Lava1964
Spittoons They'd be considered very unhygienic today, but in their day spittoons were actually a step up in public health. Used as a receptacle for spit generated by chewing tobacco, in the late 19th century spittoons became a common sight in pubs, brothels, saloons, hotels, stores, banks, railway carriages, and other places where people--especially adult men--gathered. Although brass was the most common material for spitoons, other materials ranged from basic functional iron to crafted cut glass and fine porcelain. At higher-class hotels, spittoons were often elaborately decorated. Spittoons were flat-bottomed, often weighted to minimize tipping over, and commonly had an interior lip to make spilling less likely even if they did tip over. Occasionally they'd have lids. Some had holes with an accompanying plug, to aid in draining and cleaning. Use of spittoons was considered an advance of public manners and health, intended to replace previously common habit of spitting on floors, streets, and sidewalks. Many jurisdictions passed laws against spitting in public--other than into a spittoon. Boy Scout troops organized campaigns to paint "Do not Spit on the Sidewalk" notices on city sidewalks. In 1909, Cincinnati scout troops allied with members of the Anti-Tuberculosis League painted thousands of such messages in a single night. A punny mass-produced sign common in saloons read: 'If you expect to rate as a gentleman, do not expectorate on the floor.' Spittoons were also useful for people suffering from tuberculosis who would cough up phlegm. Public spittoons would sometimes contain a solution of an antiseptic such as carbolic acid with the aim of limiting transmission of disease. With the start of the 20th century, medical doctors urged tuberculosis sufferers to use personal pocket spittoons instead of public ones; these were jars with tight lids which people could carry. After the deadly 1918 flu epidemic, both hygiene and etiquette advocates began to disparage public use of the spittoon, and use began to decline. Chewing gum replaced tobacco as the favorite chew of the younger generation. Cigarettes were considered more hygienic than spit-inducing chewing tobacco. While it was still not unusual to see spittoons in some public places as late as the 1930s, vast numbers of old brass spittoons met their ends when they were melted down during the scrap metal drives of the Second World War.
Tags: spittoons  hygiene  tobacco 
Added: 17th July 2012
Views: 4020
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Posted By: Lava1964
Mission Mars Tags: Mission  Mars  Trailer  1968  60s  movies  1960s    sci-fi  B-Movie  terrible  Allied  Artists 
Added: 11th August 2012
Views: 1865
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Posted By: Freckles
WWII: Massacre at Oradour-Sur-Glane On June 10, 1944, four days after the Allied D-Day landings in Normandy, German SS troops descended on a small, peaceful French village, Oradour-Sur-Glane, in which about 700 people lived. In a matter of a few hours, Oradour-Sur-Glane ceased to exist. Virtually every person who lived there was indiscriminately shot or burned alive. Every building was also destroyed. After the war, the French government decided to leave Oradour-Sur-Glane's ruins as they stood as a solemn reminder of the horrors of war.
Tags: Second  World  War  massacre  Oradour-Sur  Glane 
Added: 7th November 2012
Views: 3829
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Posted By: Lava1964
Boston Bruins Amazing Comeback On May 13, 2013, one of the most stunning and improbable comebacks in sports history occurred. With under 11 minutes left in regulation time, the Boston Bruins rallied from a 4-1 deficit in the seventh game of their opening round NHL playoff series versus the Toronto Maple Leafs. Boston had only scored three goals in the previous eight periods of the series before rallying. It was wild euphoria for Boston's fans--but utter disbelief for Toronto's fans. This condensed highlight clip shows the Leafs taking a 4-1 lead in the third period, the three Boston goals that tied the game, and the overtime winner by Patrice Bergeron.
Tags: Boston  Bruins  NHL  comeback  Toronto  Maple  Leafs  Stanley  Cup  playoffs 
Added: 16th May 2013
Views: 1444
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Posted By: Lava1964

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