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Troubled Actress Gail Russell Gail Russell was a dark-eyed beauty who starred with some of the most popular leading men in Hollywood in the 1940s and 1950s, including John Wayne, Joel McCrae and Alan Ladd. Born in Chicago on September 21, 1924, Russell was a shy child and often hid beneath her parents' piano when they entertained. The family moved to Los Angeles when she was 14. Even though art was Russell’s passion, her mother convinced her to audition at Paramount Studios. Gail was offered a standard seven-year contract at $50 a week. Upon graduating from high school, she signed with Paramount. Russell suffered terribly from stage fright. She made her first film appearance at 19 in Henry Aldrich Gets Glamour. The following year she appeared in Lady in the Dark. Although Russell’s role was minor, the film was nominated for three Oscars, which boosted her career. Russell's raven hair and enigmatic beauty was particularly suited to the ghost story plot of The Uninvited, her second film of 1944. During filming, Russell’s stage fright was so great that one of her co-stars suggested alcohol as a means to calm her nerves. Russell completed the film, but lost 20 pounds and later suffered a nervous breakdown. This film was also nominated for an Oscar, drawing even more attention to the young starlet. Russell played Emily Kimbrough in the 1944 comedy Our Hearts Were Young and Gay. The following year she starred as a schoolteacher opposite Alan Ladd in Salty O'Rouke, another Oscar-nominated film, then with Joel McCrae in the supernatural tale The Unseen. In 1946 she starred in Our Hearts Were Growing Up, a sequel with Diana Lynn. Before the year was over she completed yet another movie, The Bachelor’s Daughters, with Adolphe Menjou. Still, Russell continued to experience stage fright, liberally using alcohol to deal with it. In 1947, Russell performed one of her most famous roles as the innocent Quaker love of John Wayne in The Angel and the Badman. Rumors circulated that Russell and Wayne were having an affair, though they both denied anything more than friendship. In 1949, Russell once again starred as John Wayne's love interest in Wake of the Red Witch. When she learned that her husband had cast Russell in this role, John Wayne’s wife, actress Esperanza (Chata) Bauer, exploded in an alcoholic, jealous rage. When Wayne returned home late from the cast party, Bauer aimed a gun at her husband and pulled the trigger. The bullet barely missed Wayne’s head. Months later, Russell married her long-time boyfriend, television actor Guy Madison. In 1953, Russell was called to testify in John Wayne’s divorce trial and once again, Russell and Wayne both denied the affair. Two weeks later Russell was arrested for drunk driving, which fueled more rumors about an affair and caused serious damage to her marriage. Her alcoholic reputation so troubled Paramount executives they refused to renew her contract. Then Russell and Madison divorced, adding to her despair. In 1955, Russell left the scene of the crime after rear-ending another vehicle while intoxicated. In 1957 she drove her new convertible through the glass windows of Jan's Restaurant in Beverly Hills, pinning the janitor beneath her vehicle. Russell was picked up by Universal Studios and continued to star with some of the most famous names in Hollywood, including Randolph Scott. However, in August of 1957, when she failed to appear in court, officers were sent to her home and found her drunk and unconscious. The hearing was held at General Hospital where she was bedridden with severe effects from alcoholism. She joined Alcoholics Anonymous and stayed with this organization for a year, to no avail. In 1961, Russell starred in her last movie, The Silent Call. When filming was completed, she locked herself in her Los Angeles studio apartment, sketching and drinking. On August 27, 1961 Russell died from an alcohol-induced heart attack. She was just 36.
Tags: actress  Gail  Russell 
Added: 18th December 2010
Views: 4991
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Posted By: Lava1964
NFL Champs Vs. College All-Stars 1934-1976 The Chicago Charities College All-Star Game was a preseason football tilt played annually (except 1974) from 1934 to 1976 between the National Football League champions and a team of star college seniors from the previous year. (There was one exception: The 1935 game involved the 1934 runner-up Chicago Bears instead of the champion New York Giants.) The game originally was a benefit for Chicago-area charities. Except for the 1943 and 1944 games which were held at Northwestern University, the game was always played at Soldier Field in Chicago. The first game, played before a crowd of 79,432 on August 31, 1934, was a scoreless tie between the all-stars and the Chicago Bears. The following year, a game that included future president Gerald Ford, the Bears won, 5-0. The first all-star win was in 1937 for a squad that featured Sammy Baugh. In the 1940s the games were competitive affairs that attracted large crowds to Soldier Field. But as the talent level of pro football improved, the all-stars had diminishing success. The last all-star win came in 1963, when a team coached by legendary quarterback Otto Graham beat the Green Bay Packers 20-17. By the 1970s, crowds for the event were dwindling. In addition, NFL coaches were reluctant to part with their new draftees (who would miss part of training camp) for a meaningless exhibition in which the players might be injured. A players' strike forced the cancellation of the 1974 game. The last game took place in a torrential downpour on July 23, 1976. Despite featuring stars such as Chuck Muncie, Mike Pruitt, Lee Roy Selmon and Jackie Slater, the collegians were hopelessly outclassed by the Pittsburgh Steelers. Pittsburgh was leading 24-0 late in the third quarter when play was suspended due to the awful weather conditions. The game was not restarted. Chicago Tribune Charities Inc., the sponsor of the game, elected not to bring it back for 1977. A program from the 1941 game is shown here. Overall, the NFL teams won 31 of the 42 games. The all-stars won nine. Two games ended in ties.
Tags: football  all-stars  NFL 
Added: 13th December 2010
Views: 42222
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
CBS Rural Purge From 1969 through 1972, a 'rural purge' of American television networks (in particular, CBS) dramatically changed the prime time television landscape. The majority of cancellations occurred at the end of the 1970-71 television season. While cancellations have always been part of the television business, the fact that many of the cancelled shows were still quite popular made the move very controversial. Basically, the rural-themed shows lacked the young, urban-demographic audiences that CBS desired. Pat Buttram, who played Mr. Haney on Green Acres, famously noted, '[It was] the year CBS killed everything with a tree in it.' The first rural-themed show cancelled by CBS was Petticoat Junction. (This came as no real surprise as Petticoat Junction had lagged in the ratings since Bea Benaderet's death in 1968.) In September 1970 The Mary Tyler Moore Show premiered on CBS. All in the Family premiered in January 1971 as a mid-season replacement. Both series provided the urban demographic and ratings that CBS sought. These successes prompted the network to cancel Green Acres, The Beverly Hillbillies, Mayberry RFD, Hee-Haw, Lassie, and The Jim Nabors Hour at the end of the 1970-71 season. The Glen Campbell Goodtime Hour lasted until the end of the 1971-72 season. Non-rural themed shows cancelled included sitcoms Family Affair and Hogan's Heroes in 1971, with the long running My Three Sons ending in 1972. Variety shows that had been around since the late 1940s and early 1950s, The Jackie Gleason Show and The Ed Sullivan Show, were cancelled in 1970 and 1971 respectively. The Red Skelton Show was cancelled by CBS at the end the 1969-70 season. Skelton never forgave CBS.
Tags: CBS  rural  purge  television 
Added: 22nd January 2011
Views: 13613
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Posted By: Lava1964
Maria Schneider Dead at 58 It has been reported that actress Maria Schneider died of cancer on February 3, 2011 at the age of 58 after a long illness. Schneider is most famous for her performance opposite Marlon Brando in the erotic and controversial 1972 film Last Tango in Paris. Its plot centered around a secret love affair between two strangers who agree not to reveal their names to one another. Scandalous for its time, the movie featured the shapely 20-year-old Schneider in several steamy scenes featuring frontal nudity. Brando was 48 at the time.
Tags: Maria  Schneider  actress 
Added: 3rd February 2011
Views: 1800
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Posted By: Lava1964
Johnnie Ray 1927-1990 Johnnie Ray is almost forgotten today, but he was a huge singing star in the early 1950s. At the peak of his career, Ray's income was $35,000 a week. Born in Oregon in 1927, Ray had top 40 hits until 1957. Despite being skinny, pigeon-toed, half-deaf and effeminate, this highly emotional performer was the most popular male singer of the pre-Elvis Presely era. Indeed, when Elvis first started out, he was often introduced on stage as "the new Johnnie Ray". Known as "the Prince of Wails" for his distinctive singing style, Ray is mostly remembered for his lip-quivering early 1950s hits such as Cry; Please, Mr Sun; and The Little White Cloud That Cried. His live performances, in which he sometimes played the piano, were wildly unpredictable. It was not uncommon for Ray to break into tears or flop to the stage floor while belting out a tune. His 1954 recording of Such A Night was the first chart hit to be banned by the BBC for its "suggestive" lyrics. Several American radio stations followed suit. Nevertheless, it still ended up topping the British charts. Ray had an interesting personal life: He became deaf in his right ear at age 13 after an accident at a Boy Scout camp and prominently wore a large hearing aid for the rest of his life. He was twice arrested in Detroit for soliciting sex from men. The first arrest was in 1951 just before he became famous. (He quietly pled guilty and paid a fine.) The second arrest was in 1959, but he was acquitted by an all-female jury. He is rumored to have had a long affair with newspaper writer Dorothy Kilgallen (of What's My Line? fame) that began after his first of two mystery guest appearances on the show. Ray was a heavy drinker who was hospitalized for alcoholism in 1960. He died in 1990, at age 63, from liver disease.
Tags: Johnnie  Ray  singer 
Added: 17th January 2012
Views: 5240
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Posted By: Lava1964
Gene Stephens 3-Hit Inning On June 18, 1953, 20-year-old Gene Stephens collected three hits in one inning for the Boston Red Sox during a 23-3 victory over the Detroit Tigers at Fenway Park. The Bosox exploded for 17 runs in the seventh inning - sending 23 batters to the plate during their 47-minute half of the frame. Stephens had a double and two singles off three different Detroit pitchers. The 17 runs scored by Boston in that inning were two more than the previous modern MLB record, set by the Brooklyn Dodgers in a May 21, 1952, contest against the Cincinnati Reds. The Red Sox had 14 hits in their memorable inning to set a new modern MLB mark in that category. Gene Stephens was mostly a reserve player in his 12 MLB seasons. His batting average was only .204 in 1953, making his three-hit inning on June 18 even more surprising. The Red Sox led 5-3 going into their half of the seventh inning. Detroit pitcher Steve Gromek allowed nine of the 17 runs while Dick Weik and Earl Harrist each allowed four. Boston had 27 total hits in the game. The day before, they had 20 hits when they walloped Detroit 17-1. “I was the youngest ballplayer in the major leagues at the time,” Stephens recalled years later, whose three-hit performance was witnessed by only 3,108 Fenway fans that afternoon. “I probably shouldn’t have even been in the major leagues at that time. Ted Williams had gone to the Korean War and, therefore, that gave me the opportunity to play. As soon as [Williams] came back, the Red Sox optioned me down to their AAA team in Louisville." The all-time record for most runs scored in an inning is 18, set by the Chicago White Stockings against the Detroit Wolverines on Sept. 6, 1883, in a National League affair. During that onslaught (also in the seventh inning), three different Chicago players had three hits in the frame: Tommy Burns (two doubles, one home run), Fred Pfeffer (two singles, one double), and Ned Williamson (two singles, one double). The only other hitter in modern MLB history (since 1900) with three hits in one inning was Johnny Damon, who was also a member of the Boston Red Sox. Damon achieved his feat when Boston whipped the Florida Marlins 25-8 on June 27, 2003. Damon collected three hits (a single, double, and triple) in the first inning as the Bosox scored a record 10 runs before any Boston batter was put out.
Tags: baseball  Gene  Stephens  hits  Red  Sox 
Added: 27th May 2012
Views: 2318
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Posted By: Lava1964
Bob Richards 1956-1994 Bob Richards was born as Robert L. Schwartz, He was the Chief Meteorologist at KSDK in 1983 to 1994, He grew up in Bloomfield, New Jersey, Before KSDK he was a Meteorologist at The Weather Channel through 1982 to 1983, also earned the Seal Of Apporval from the American Meteorological Society, But his tormented and embarrassment of his affair becoming public. On March 23rd, 1994, Richards took off his private plane from Spirit of St. Louis Airport and crash his plane to the ground, and he was killed, He committed suicide.
Tags: 1994  Bob  Richards  Meteorologist  KSDK  St  Louis  Missouri  1983  American  Meteorological  Society  Chief 
Added: 20th June 2012
Views: 4928
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Posted By: poundsdwayne47
Mrs Beazley Doll Tags: Mrs  Beazley  Doll  Family  Affair  Brian  Keith  Sebastian  Cabot  Kathy  Garver  Johnny  Whitaker  Anissa  Jones 
Added: 17th May 2013
Views: 1142
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Posted By: Cathy
1927 Snyder-Judd Murder Case It is barely known today, but in 1927 the public was fascinated with the Snyder-Judd murder case. It was unsurpassed in media coverage until the 1936 trial of Bruno Hauptmann for the Lindbergh baby's kidnapping and murder. In 1925, Ruth Snyder, an unhappy housewife from Queens Village in New York City, began an affair with Henry Judd Gray, a married corset salesman. Stuck in a loveless marriage, Snyder began to plan the murder of her husband, Albert, enlisting the help of her new lover, though he appeared to be very reluctant. (Ruth's distaste for her husband apparently began two days after their marriage when he insisted on hanging a picture of his late fiancée, Jessie Guishard, on the wall of their first home. He also named his boat after her!) Ruth Snyder persuaded her husband to purchase an insurance policy that paid double indemnity if an unexpected act of violence killed him. According to Judd Gray, Ruth had earlier made at least seven attempts to kill her husband, all of which he survived. The culprits were not exactly criminal masterminds. On March 20, 1927, the couple garrotted Albert Snyder in his bed and stuffed his nose full of chloroform-soaked rags, then clumsily staged his death as part of a burglary. Detectives at the scene noted that the burglar left little evidence of breaking into the house. The behavior of Mrs. Snyder was wholly inconsistent with her story of a terrorized wife witnessing her husband being killed. Police quickly found the property Ruth claimed had been stolen hidden under the mattress of her own bed. A breakthrough came when a detective found a paper with the letters "J.G." on it. (It was a memento Albert Snyder had kept from former love Jessie Guishard.) They asked Ruth about it. Flustered, Ruth's mind immediately turned to her own lover, whose initials were also "J.G.," and asked the detective what "Judd Gray had to do with this." It was the first time Gray had been mentioned, and the police were instantly suspicious. Gray was located in Syracuse, NY. He claimed he had been there all night, but eventually it turned out a friend of his had created an alibi, setting up Gray's room at a hotel. Gray proved far more forthcoming than Ruth about his actions. He was arrested because his railroad ticket stub was found in his hotel wastebasket! Furthermore, Gray had escaped the murder scene by taking a taxi from Manhattan to Long Island. The cabbie easily remembered Gray because he had only tipped the driver a nickel on a $3.50 fare. He was charged with first-degree murder along with Ruth Snyder. Snyder and Gray blamed each other for plotting the murder. Both were convicted and died in Sing Sing prison's electric chair on January 12, 1928. Snyder was the first woman executed in New York state since 1899. This photo, illegally snapped by a New York Daily News photographer with a hidden camera, was taken at the moment when Snyder was jolted by the electric charge. The Snyder-Judd murder case inspired at least one play and two Hollywood movies: The Postman Always Rings Twice and Double Indemnity.
Tags: murder  Snyder-Judd  case 
Added: 26th November 2013
Views: 2219
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Posted By: Lava1964
Johnny Whitaker- Jody on Family Affair Tags: Johnny  Whitaker-  Jody  on  Family  Affair  John  Orson  Whitaker,  Jr.  Tom  Sawyer    The  Littlest  Angel 
Added: 18th March 2015
Views: 1199
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Posted By: pfc

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