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Wall Street Bombing - 1920 One of the least remembered terrorist attacks in American history occurred just past noon on Thursday, September 16, 1920 in the hub of America's financial center--New York City's Wall Street. An unattended horse-drawn wagon loaded with a bomb containing dynamite and 500 pounds of small iron weights was parked in front of 23 Wall Street. The corner building was then the headquarters of J.P. Morgan & Co., the nation's most powerful bank. At 12:01 p.m., the timer on the bomb reached zero and a terrific explosion rocked the street. The concussion from the blast was so severe that it derailed a trolley car two blocks away. Several hundred people were injured by flying shrapnel and broken glass falling from the surrounding buildings. There were 38 fatalities--most of whom were not major financial magnates, but average Wall Street employees: clerical staff and messengers on their lunch breaks. Anarchist literature was found nearby threatening violence unless unnamed political prisoners were released. No arrests were ever made in the case, but historians and crime buffs strongly believe the bombing was carried out by an anti-capitalist/anarchist named Mario Buda who fled to Italy shortly after the bombing and stayed there until his death in 1963. Buda apparently was motivated by the arrests of fellow anarchists Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti earlier that year for the April 15, 1920 robbery of a Massachusetts shoe factory's payroll in which a security guard was killed. The only two deadlier terrorists attacks on American soil in the 20th century were the Bath School bombing of 1927 and the massive explosion at the federal building in Oklahoma City in 1995. Despite the passage of nearly a century, deep shrapnel marks from the 1920 explosion are still visible on the limestone facade of 23 Wall Street.
Tags: Wall  Street  Bombing  terrorism 
Added: 15th February 2016
Views: 1540
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Posted By: Lava1964
Pickles the Pooch Finds Stolen World Cup The Jules Rimet Trophy--more commonly known as soccer's World Cup--was stolen on March 20, 1966. It was snatched from a glass display case at Methodist Central Hall in the Westminster section of London, England when the security guard assigned to keep an eye on it was temporarily absent from his post. England was going to host the quadrennial soccer tourney in three months--and the theft was a huge embarrassment for the country's Football Association. Shortly thereafter Joe Mears, the president of the F.A., received a parcel containing part of the World Cup. It was accompanied by a ransom note from a man calling himself Jackson. It demanded 15,000 British pounds in small denominations or else he would melt down the golden symbol of soccer supremacy. Mears contacted the police who arranged for a detective named Len Buggy to act on behalf of the ailing Mears who suffered from heart trouble. Buggy agreed to meet Jackson at London's Battersea Park at a specified time. Buggy brought a briefcase containing only about 500 pounds but Jackson did not bother to count it. Instead he got into Buggy's car and instructed him to drive aimlessly around London for 10 minutes. Jackson noticed a police van tailing the car. He panicked and attempted to escape on foot. He was quickly apprehended and identified as Edward Betchley, a 46-year-old army veteran. He claimed to be acting as a middle-man for a mysterious fellow he called The Pole. Betchley was the only man who was ever arrested in connection with the crime. He served two years in prison and died shortly thereafter of emphysema in 1969. The World Cup was missing for a week until David Corbett took Pickles--his mongrel dog--for a walk in the Norwich section of London on March 27. Pickles was drawn to a bundle tightly wrapped in newspaper lying near a parked car. Corbett removed the newspaper and there was the World Cup! Corbett immediately contacted police--who promptly interrogated him as a possible suspect. They finally let him go at 2:30 a.m. for lack of evidence. Pickles became a celebrity pooch. He was named Dog of the Year, was awarded a year's supply of dog food, appeared on several British TV shows, and had a feature role in a movie. Pickles was also invited to appear on TV programs in Chile, Yugoslavia and Brazil, but Corbett declined the offers as they would have required Pickles to go through strict quarantine measures and get several vaccinations to travel abroad. Corbett estimates that Pickles earned him 3000 pounds--money he put toward the purchase of a new house. When England won the World Cup on July 30, Pickles was invited to attend the team's private post-match victory party--a gathering so exclusive that even the players' wives were barred by the F.A.! Sadly Pickles accidentally suffocated in 1967 when his choke leash became entangled in a tree.
Tags: Pickles  dog  stolen  World  Cup  soccer 
Added: 19th February 2016
Views: 2476
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Posted By: Lava1964
McDonalds Prices - 1950s A typical McDonald's meal wouldn't even cost you half a dollar in the 1950s--as these prices from a newspaper ad prove.
Tags: McDonalds  prices  1950s 
Added: 15th May 2017
Views: 3885
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Match Game 75 - Fannie Flagg is Smitten Here is one of the most amusing scenes in the frequently amusing history of Match Game. In this 1975 episode, panelist Fannie Flagg is quite smitten with contestant Ron Valenti, a young, handsome, middle-school gym teacher. After Fannie helps Ron win $500, the kissing starts. After she helps him win $5000, well...
Tags: Match  Game  Fannie  Flag  gym  teacher  kissing 
Added: 16th September 2017
Views: 3294
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Posted By: Lava1964
Rarest Canadian Coin - 1936 Dot Cent The rarest and most desirable coin in Canadian history is the "1936 dot" one-cent coin. Only three are known to exist. Why were they struck? On January 20, 1936, King George V died shortly after his 71st birthday. As is customary with Canadian coinage, if a monarch dies anytime during a year, his/her portrait remains on all the coins minted in that year. George V was succeeded on the throne by his eldest son, Edward VIII. Anyone with even passing knowledge of the history of the British royal family ought to know that Edward VIII abdicated late in 1936 in order to marry American divorcee Wallis Simpson. He was succeeded by his younger brother, who became George VI. This presented a problem for the Royal Canadian Mint. It had already prepared dies for its 1937 coins with the likeness of Edward VIII, which were now outdated and useless. It was feared that the new dies with George VI's head would not be ready for striking in 1937. The mint conceived a backup plan: They would reissue the 1936 coins bearing George V's likeness, but place a dot below the 1936 date to indicate they were made during the 1937 mintage year. Only three samples of the one-cent coin bearing the distinctive dot were struck--and all three were kept by the director of the mint. As it turned out, the dies for 1937 with George VI's head were ready in time for 1937 strikes, so the 1936 dot coins were not needed. One of the three rare coins sold at auction in 2013 for about $250,000 U.S.
Tags: 1936  dot  Canadian  cent  rare  numismatics 
Added: 7th December 2017
Views: 1400
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Posted By: Lava1964
Red Skelton Visits Johnny Carson Two of the very best doing what they do best: From 1983, 70-year-old Red Skelton is a wonderful guest on Johnny Carson's Tonight Show. (Johnny once was a writer for Skelton back in the 1950s.)
Tags: Red  Skelton  Johnny  Carson  interview 
Added: 21st December 2017
Views: 1030
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Posted By: Lava1964
Swedish hockey player flings silver medal into crowd I've been watching sports for 50 years. I've never seen anything like this occur before: At the IIHF 2018 World Under 20 hockey championship tournament in Buffalo, NY, Swedish captain Lias Andersson petulantly flung his silver medal into the crowd! Sweden had just lost the gold-medal game to Canada by a 3-1 score. (Canada had broken a 1-1 tie by scoring with 1:40 left in the third period and then added an empty-net goal not long afterward.) Obviously, the disappointed Swede was in no mood to accept a consolation prize. The medal was returned to him a few minutes after his outburst.
Tags: Lias  Andersson  medal  Sweden  hockey 
Added: 6th January 2018
Views: 1040
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Posted By: Lava1964
Interstate 44 and Interstate 50 East at Exit 276 Interstate 270 exits Interstate 44 & US 50 East at Interstate 270 exits, Sunset Hills, Missouri, 1989
Tags: Interstate  44  Interstate  270  US  50  Missouri  Sunset  Hills  Exits  St  Louis  1989  Button  Copy  Highways  Roads  Travel   
Added: 5th August 2018
Views: 735
Rating:
Posted By: poundsdwayne47
Interstate 270 North at Interstate 44 US 50 Route 366 East exits Interstate 270 North at Interstate 44, US 50, Route 366 East exits, St. Louis, Missouri, 1989
Tags: Interstate  270  Missouri  Button  Copy  Signs  Highways  Saint  Interstate  44  St  Louis  1989  Highways  Roads  Button  Copy  Signs 
Added: 7th September 2018
Views: 901
Rating:
Posted By: poundsdwayne47

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