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1916 World Series Mascots The boy masocts of the Boston Red Sox and Brooklyn Robins shake hands prior to a 1916 World Series game at Braves Field in Boston--most likely Game One. In that series, the Red Sox chose to play their home games at Braves Field rather than Fenway Park because of the larger seating capacity in the National League ballpark. (They had done the same thing in 1915.) Boston won the 1916 World Series in five games.
Tags: baseball  World  Series  mascots  Braves  Field 
Added: 21st February 2011
Views: 1427
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Posted By: Lava1964
Albertine Lapensee Mystery During the First world War, most of Canada's young able-bodied males enlisted in the military. As a result the quality of men's hockey dropped dramatically. For a short time, women's pro hockey took center stage--and Albertine Lapensee briefly and mysteriously became a superstar. Nicknamed 'the Miracle Maid,' the 26-year-old Lapensee played for her hometown Cornwall (Ontario) Victorias. Her hockey debut came in January 1916 against Ottawa; she scored five of the six goals in Cornwall's victory. Immediately after her debut game, Ottawa players complained that she was really a man. Suspicions and accusations dogged her the rest of her brief career. A week after her debut, Lapensee scored four goals in an 8-0 shutout against the Montreal Westerns before a crowd of about 3,000 fans. At one point the Montreal players yanked off Lapensee's toque to see how long her hair was. (She had braids that fell past her shoulders.) The continuous rumors about Lapensee's gender prompted her hometown newspaper, the Cornwall Standard, to vouch for her. Miss Lapensee, it said, '...played more with her brothers and other boys than with her girlfriends, and this accounts for the masculine style of play she has developed.' Furthermore, 'Scores of people in East Cornwall have known her since her infancy.' Albertine played on, indifferent to the rumours, and the fans didn't seem to mind too much either, as large crowds came to watch her play. In one game she scored 15 goals. When the Victorias agreed to play against the Ottawa Alerts, the Vics' manager had to guarantee Lapensee's appearance by contract. She even behaved like her male counterparts off the ice. She once refused to play until she had been paid, which nearly caused a riot. Although scoring records for the time are incomplete, they indicate Albertine scored about 80 percent of Cornwall's goals in the 1916-1917 season. The next season, Lapensee led her team to an undefeated season. Then, after two spectacular seasons, Albertine Lapensee vanished. There is no record of her playing hockey again--at least as Albertine Lapensee. Family legend says she went to New York in 1918 and had a sex change operation. She/he supposedly married and settled down to run a gas station near Cornwall under the name of Albert Smyth. There are no known photos of Lapensee. Her story is not widely known--not even in Canada.
Tags: hockey  Albertine  Lapensee  controversy  gender 
Added: 24th June 2011
Views: 2669
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Posted By: Lava1964
Billy West - Chaplin Impersonator Billy West (September 22, 1892 - July 21, 1975) was an actor, producer, and director of the silent film era. He is best known as a terrific Charlie Chaplin impersonator. Born Roy B. Weissburg in Russia, West adopted his professional name some time after emigrating to America. He appeared in many short films, first in Apartment No. 13 in 1912. In 1917 movie theaters couldn't get enough Charlie Chaplin comedies, and an enterprising producer hired West, who had been doing comic pantomimes on the vaudeville stage, to make imitation-Chaplin subjects to meet the demand. West, wearing the identical tramp costume and makeup, copied Chaplin's movements and gestures so accurately that modern audiences often mistake West for the genuine performer. Chaplin himself saw the Billy West company filming on a Hollywood street, and allegedly told West, 'You're a damned good imitator.' Some West comedies were later deceitfully re-released on the home-movie market as 'Charlie Chaplin' pictures. Most of the West comedies of 1917-18 resembled the Chaplin comedies of 1916-17, with Oliver Hardy approximating the villainy of Eric Campbell, and Leatrice Joy in the Edna Purviance ingenue role.
Tags: silent  films  Billy  west  Chaplin  impersonator 
Added: 7th July 2011
Views: 1788
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Posted By: Lava1964
Hedy Lamar - Brains and Beauty Hedy Lamar combined brains and beauty. Her flight to America would make an excellent movie! Hedy was born in Austria in 1916. At age 17 - in the 1933 Czech film Ecstasy - she appeared in a steamy love scene, and swam nude in a 10 minute onscreen sequence. Ecstasy was banned in America for being indecent. At 19, her parents gave her into an arranged marriage with an Austrian arms dealer. She attended hundreds of parties as his trophy wife, mingling many times with Hitler and Mussolini, and lived in the Salzberg castle where The Sound of Music was later filmed. Hedy's husband was a control freak, and she fled him in dramatic fashions. In her first attempt, with her husband chasing her, she hid in a brothel. In desperation, with her husband stalking the halls of the brothel, she actually serviced a customer during her attempt to hide. In a later, successful escape, Hedy hired a maid who looked like her. She drugged the maid, donned her uniform, exited by the service entrance, and made her way to London. In some versions of this story, she escaped during a party, taking most of her jewels with her. Hedy later boarded a ship for America, and Louis B. Mayer signed her to a studio contract while en route to America, and still aboard ship. She must have been brilliant. While in America, Hedy co-invented a system of switching frequencies which is still used by the U.S. military to control some missiles. It's principles are also used in wireless internet technology, and in many cellphones. She got the idea while playing piano duets with her co-inventor: composer George Antheil. She would follow Antheil on the piano as he - switching from key to key and rhythm to rhythm - attempted both to throw her off, and to create interesting interplay.
Tags: actress  Hedy  Lamar 
Added: 25th August 2011
Views: 2736
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Posted By: Lava1964
Annette Kellermann - First Swimsuit Model Australia's Annette Kellermann had weak legs as a child, so her doctor prescribed a rigorous regimen of swimming exercises to strengthen them. The advice worked wonders. By age 13 in 1900, she was a local swimming champion, having mastered numerous strokes. Kellermann found the pantaloon-type female bathing suits of the era ridiculously restrictive, however, so she designed her own form-fitting one-piece swimsuits (as pictured here). They were both revolutionary and scandalous. In 1908 a Harvard doctor declared Kellerman to be "the perfect woman". Her fame opened up many doors to her. The shapely Kellermann became a silent movie star; in 1916's A Daughter of the Gods she became the first actress in American movie history to do a nude scene. (Her long hair covered most of her body, however.) She also continued advocating the healthful benefits of swimming in books and magazines. She even penned children's books. Kellermann is also credited with being a pioneer in the field of synchronized swimming. She died in 1975 at the age of 88.
Tags: Annette  Kellermann  swimming  model  actress 
Added: 20th March 2018
Views: 981
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Posted By: Lava1964
Polio Vaccine Campaign 1954 From 1916 through 1952 the United States and Canada experienced horrible outbreaks of polio every few years. At one point, one out of every 5000 children was diagnosed with the dreaded disease. Polio is a virus which can be contracted through contacting bodily fluids from someone already infected. Early symptoms might include headaches and a runny nose. However, once the virus moves to the central nervous system, it can cause paralysis and even death. Sneezing and coughing accelerate the spread of polio. Therefore there was justifiable panic in communities when outbreaks occurred. Public gathering places would be declared off limits. (Swimming pools were typically the first places to be closed.) Municipal parks would be eerily vacant. Researchers later determined, somewhat ironically, that young children were most susceptible to polio because most North American births in the 20th century occurred in the sterile environs of hospitals. These newborns did not naturally come in contact with small amounts of the disease as did their ancestors who were born at home. Accordingly, their immune systems did not develop sufficient resistance to the virus. Researchers Jonas Salk and Albert Sabin worked separately to find a cure. Both believed that by exposing children to minute traces of the virus through immunizations their immune systems would build up a lifetime immunity to polio. Salk favored vaccine containing the dead polio virus while Sabin favored live-virus vaccine. In 1954, two years after the terrible 1952 outbreak, more than 1.83 million children volunteered to be "polio pioneers" and serve as guinea pigs for Salk's virus. As a reward for their bravery, each was given a lollipop, plus a button and certificate acknowledging participation in the program. None of the volunteers contracted polio.
Tags: polio  research  vaccine  volunteers 
Added: 13th May 2012
Views: 2189
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Posted By: Lava1964
Mercury Dimes The coin commonly referred to as the "Mercury dime" was a ten-cent coin struck by the United States Mint from 1916 to 1945. It is one of the great misnomers in numismatic history. Designed by Adolph Weinman, it is properly called the Winged Liberty dime, as the face depicts a female Liberty figure rather than the male god Mercury. It gained its wrong but commonly used name as the obverse depiction of a young Liberty, identifiable by her winged Phrygian cap, was confused with the Roman god Mercury. Weinman is believed to have used Elsie Stevens, the wife of lawyer and poet Wallace Stevens, as a model. The coin's reverse depicts a fasces, symbolizing unity and strength, and an olive branch, signifying peace. The value of each Mercury dime is more than $2 because of the current price of silver. The Roosevelt dime replaced it in 1946.
Tags: numismatics  Mercury  Liberty  dimes 
Added: 26th January 2013
Views: 1307
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Posted By: Lava1964
Unknown Chaplin Film Found - Zepped In 2009 a British film buff named Morace Park purchased an old nitrate film canister on eBay for $5. When Park got his purchase he was surprised to find a roll of old silent film inside. He was downright shocked to discover it was a 1916 Charlie Chaplin comedy called Zepped that no one had ever heard of--including his neighbor who was a film historian. It turned out that Zepped was produced without Chaplin's knowledge by using outtakes from three known Chaplin films from 1914 and 1915 along with some animated sequences. The seven-minute film's climax is when Kaiser Wilhelm emerges from a gigantic sausage and Charlie knocks him out--presumably for the sake of bolstering the spirits of Londoners who suffered through sporadic German zeppelin raids during the First World War. Since the initial discovery, two other copies of the film have turned up--and researchers have found documented evidence that Zepped was shown by some British exhibitors in 1916 and 1917. Based on the notations on the film and titles that use the uniquely English term 'blighty,' the film was put together illegally either in Great Britain or Egypt. Who was behind the illegal project will probably never be known for certain.
Tags: Zepped  Charlie  Chaplin  fim 
Added: 2nd March 2015
Views: 1198
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Posted By: Lava1964
Verdun Ossuary - 1964 Most Americans are barely aware of it, but one of the most terrible battles in history occurred near the northern French city of Verdun from February through November 1916. The Germans launched a massive attack on February 21 with both numerical superiority and the element of surprise. Verdun was supposed to be a quiet French sector on the Western Front and was held largely by lightly regarded territorial troops. The Germans hoped to bleed the French army to at least force an armistice on the Western Front. The embattled French considered the defense of Verdun to be symbolic of resistance. "They shall not pass!" became the rallying cry of the defenders. At some point during the battle virtually every able-bodied French soldier served at the Verdun front. The carnage was atrocious as positions sometimes changed hands several times each day. Eventually the German High Command called off the attack. In those nine months of ceaseless fighting casualties approached one million, with at least 500,000 killed. In 1964 Life magazine published a pictorial feature about what Verdun looked like 48 years after the battle. Perhaps the most shocking photo was the one shown here: An ossuary containing the bones of about 130,000 unknown soldiers from both sides. Interestingly, Life's photographer was Alfred Eisenstaedt--a German veteran of the war.
Tags: Verdun  battle  ossuary  First  World  War 
Added: 22nd July 2015
Views: 1286
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Posted By: Lava1964
Hans Schmidt - Murdering Priest Father Hans Schmidt, a handsome Catholic priest originally from Germany, is the only person from his profession ever to be executed in American history. Born in Bavaria in 1881, Schmidt immigrated to the United States in 1909. He was first assigned to a church in Louisville, KY, but a dispute with a fellow priest prompted his relocation to St. Boniface Church in New York City. He quickly gained a reputation of being a fiery orator whose sermons often warned about the temptations of the flesh. Anna Aumuller, an attractive Austrian housekeeper employed by the rectory, caught his eye. The feeling was mutual. Contrary his vows of celibacy, Schmidt became sexually involved with Anna. It was later discovered the two were secretly married in a service of dubious legal standing performed by Schmidt himself! Anna became pregnant shortly thereafter. Schmidt realized this development would be the end of his priesthood, so he slit Anna's throat on September 2, 1913, dismembered her body, and dumped the pieces into the Hudson River. Nevertheless, the victim was identified because parts of the body had been wrapped in monogrammed linen that Anna had specially ordered. Confronted with this evidence, Schmidt confessed to the murder but attempted an insanity defense. It resulted in one hung jury but he was convicted in a second trial. Schmidt went to his death at Sing Sing Prison's electric chair on February 18, 1916. Police later found that Schmidt had another criminal enterprise: a secret apartment well stocked with counterfeiting equipment. Worse still, it was discovered that a nine-year-old girl had been murdered at Schmidt's former church in Louisville and the body--which the killer had tried to dismember--was buried in the church's basement. The church's janitor had been convicted of the crime, however.
Tags: Hans  Schmidt  murderer  priest 
Added: 14th January 2016
Views: 1126
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Posted By: Lava1964

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