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Evelyn Nesbit Scandal 1906 Evelyn Nesbit was a beautiful teenage model at the turn of the twentieth century. She supported herself and her widowed mother by posing for various artists and photographers. Her good looks won her a job as a Broadway chorus girl. This photo of her was taken in 1901 when Evelyn was 16. That same year she caught the eye of renowned architect and womanizer Stanford White--who was 47. White was married, but he often 'befriended' attractive teenage girls. Because of White's wealth and prestige, Evelyn's mother encouraged the relationship. White often 'entertained' young female friends in his lavish tower apartment at Madison Square Garden (which he designed). In the apartment were numerous strategically positioned mirrors and a red velvet swing. White apparently derived much pleasure watching his nubile young ladies cavort on it. According to Nesbit, White took advantage of her one night in the apartment after getting her to pose for suggestive photos in a yellow silk kimono and plying her with champagne. After deflowering Nesbit, White lost interest in her. Nesbit later became involved with Harry Thaw, the son of a Pittsburgh coal and railroad tycoon. Thaw himself was a possessive, sexual sadist who often beat Evelyn. Nevertheless, the two were married in 1905. Thaw became obsessed with Evelyn's stories about White. On June 25, 1906, Evelyn and Harry had two chance encounters with White. The first was at a cafe. The second was at a theatrical performance at Madison Square Garden's roof theatre. Thaw, who always carried a pistol, fired three shots into White's face at close range, killing him instantly. He is said to have shouted, 'You ruined my wife!' Thaw was tried twice for White's murder. The first trial ended with a deadlocked jury. At the second trial Thaw pled temporary insanity. Thaw's mother encouraged Evelyn to testify that White had raped her and Harry shot White to avenge her honor. Evelyn was supposed to get a quickie divorce and $1 million from the Thaw family. The divorce was granted, but Evelyn never got a penny. She was a minor celebrity for a few years and vanished into obscurity. She died in 1967 at the age of 82. Thaw was institutionalized until 1915 and died in 1947. Late in her life Nesbit claimed that Stanford White was the only man she ever truly loved. The story of the scandal was made into a 1955 movie starring Joan Collins titled The Girl In The Red Velvet Swing.
Tags: Evelyn  Nesbit  Stanford  White  Harry  Thaw  scandal 
Added: 15th December 2007
Views: 5132
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Posted By: Lava1964
Battleship Potemkin Baby Carriage Scene Russian filmmaker Sergei Eisenstein's silent 1927 masterpiece Battleship Potemkin, about the failed 1905 Russian Revolution, contains this memorable and powerful scene. Tzarist troops open fire on demonstrators assembled on a staircase in Odessa. One is a mother with a baby carriage.
Tags: Sergei  Eisenstein  Battleship  Potemkin  carriage 
Added: 16th December 2007
Views: 4231
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Posted By: Lava1964
Call Her Savage   1932 Clara Gordon Bow was born in Brooklyn, New York (1905). Her early life was marred by poverty, mental illness (her mother was schizophrenic) and violence. Her mother slit Clara's throat in a rage over her decision to pursue a film career. During the early 1920s, Clara won a magazine beauty contest which led to a successful screen test. Her film career spanned eleven years from 1922 to 1933. During that time, Bow made 56 films. In 1928, she was the highest paid screen actor making $35,000 per week. With her nasal tone and heavy Brooklyn accent, her career began to decline with the advent of sound. Bow's career was damaged further by several highly publicized lawsuits for alienation of affection. She was also plagued by mental health problems that lead to repeated institutionalization throughout the remainder of her life. She died of a heart attack at age 60 in West Hollywood. . .
Tags: Clara      Bow      Call  Her  Savage      1932 
Added: 31st August 2008
Views: 1596
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Posted By: Teresa
1905 Dawson City Nuggets One of the great sports stories of the twentieth century was the improbable challenge for the Stanley Cup made by the Dawson City Nuggets back in 1905. The Cup was still a challenge trophy at the time, and somehow a group of recreational hockey players from the distant Yukon Territory was granted permission by the Cup's trustees to play the powerful Ottawa Silver Seven for Lord Stanley's hardware in 1905. Now all they had to do was travel 4,400 miles to Ottawa for the best-of three series. The Nuggets made their way to the Canadian capital by bicycle, dog sled, boat, railroad, and on foot. They arrived in Ottawa exhausted just one day before the first game was scheduled. They promptly lost 9-2. The next game was even worse. The defending champs from Ottawa won 23-2. Frank McGee notched 14 goals for the winners.
Tags: Dawson  CIty  Nuggets  hockey 
Added: 15th June 2009
Views: 1557
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Posted By: Lava1964
The Oldest LOL CAT This antique postcard, published in 1905 is of historical importance as it appears to be the oldest LOLcat in existence. Perhaps soon, archeologists will discover an even older LOLcat on the walls of an Egyptian tomb... perhaps a cat with the caption, "I see what you did there!"
Tags: The  Oldest  LOL  CAT  antique  postcard  1905  LOLcat   
Added: 11th July 2009
Views: 7228
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Posted By: Cliffy
Adding Machine 1905 Adding machines have been around for more than a century, but the old-fashioned 'crank' models had pretty much disappeared from offices by the late 1980s. William S. Burroughs (1855-1898) invented an adding and listing machine with a full keyboard in the early 1880s. He submitted a patent application in 1885, co-founded the American Arithmometer Co. in 1886 to produce the machine, and received a patent for his invention in 1888. After its Bankers' and Merchants' Registering Accountant machine failed in trials in 1890, the American Arithmometer Co. marketed its improved Burroughs Registering Accountant in 1892 for $475. In 1905, the company was renamed the Burroughs Adding Machine Co. In 1894, an article in a bankers' publication-- clearly referring to the Burroughs Registering Accountant--reported that 'An ingenious adding machine, recently introduced in Providence banks, is said to be infallible in results, and to do the work of two or three active clerks. Inclosed in a frame with heavy plate-glass panels, through which the working of the mechanism can be seen, the machine occupies a space of 11 by 15 inches and is nine inches high. On an inclined keyboard are 81 keys, arranged in nine rows of nine keys each. The printing is done through an inked ribbon.' Shown here is a Burroughs model from 1905. A seat is provided for the user! How quaint!
Tags: adding  machine 
Added: 22nd June 2010
Views: 2215
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Posted By: Lava1964
Penny Postcards In 1873 American postmaster John Creswell introduced the first pre-stamped penny postcards. These first postcards depicted the Interstate Industrial Exposition that took place in Chicago that year. The postcards were made because people were looking for an easier way to send quick notes. They were an instant hit with the public. The first postcard to be printed as a souvenir in the United States was created in 1893 to advertise the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago. The Post Office was the only establishment allowed to print postcards, and it held its monopoly until May 19, 1898, when Congress passed the Private Mailing Card Act which allowed private publishers and printers to produce postcards. Initially, the United States government prohibited private companies from calling their cards 'postcards,' so they were instead known as 'souvenir cards.' To adhere to the law, these cards had to be labeled 'Private Mailing Cards.' This prohibition was finally rescinded in December 24, 1901 when private companies could legally use the word 'postcard' as they pleased. The golden age of American postcards lasted until 1915. In 1908 alone, more than 677 million postcards were mailed in the United States. Below is a sample from 1905.
Tags: penny  postcards 
Added: 1st November 2010
Views: 1738
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Posted By: Lava1964
Time travel to 1905 Today we travel back in time to the year 1905 in San Francisco for a trip on board a cable car on Market Street. Kina spooky.
Tags: Time  travel    1905 
Added: 1st November 2010
Views: 2870
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Posted By: Wolfen
Barber Pole Hockey Uniforms Stripes galore were the norm on many hockey uniforms of the early twentieth century, as proven by the uniforms worn by the 1905 Stanley Cup champion Ottawa Silver Seven.
Tags: hockey  uniforms  stripes  Ottawa 
Added: 9th March 2011
Views: 1373
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Posted By: Lava1964
Boarding School Girls At Coney Island 1905 Hold on to your knickers, they get in their bathing suits!
Tags: Boarding  School  Girls  At  Coney  Island  1900  1905  05   
Added: 2nd October 2012
Views: 2187
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Posted By: Steve

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