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Mabel Normand Mabel Normand was probably the most successful comedienne of the silent screen era. Nobody know exactly when she was born. Sources list 1892, 1893, and 1895 as possible years for Mabel's birth. She started to appear in movies in 1909 and was one of Mack Sennett's bathing beauties. By 1913 Mabel was writing, directing, and starring in films. Like any good movie star, Mabel was involved in a few scandals. Sadly she died of tuberculosis in 1930 and is only well known to silent films buffs today.
Tags: Mabel  Normand 
Added: 9th March 2008
Views: 1425
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Posted By: Lava1964
Stanley Cup The coolest trophy in sports is the Stanley Cup. The Cup was originally the silver bowl that is atop the present trophy. It was purchased for about $50 by Lord Stanley of Preston, the Governor-General of Canada, and was intended to be awarded annually to the amateur hockey champions of Canada. It was first presented in 1893 to the Montreal Amateur Athletic Association club. Professional teams were openly allowed to compete for it starting in 1909. The National Hockey League took permanent possession of it in 1926. Over the years it's had its share of adventures and misadventures: The Stanley Cup has been used as a flower pot, dropkicked into Ottawa's Rideau Canal, left on a Montreal street corner, and used as an exotic dancer's prop in a New York City strip joint.
Tags: Stanley  Cup 
Added: 24th April 2008
Views: 1427
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Posted By: Lava1964
Krakatoa Erupts 1883 The beginning of the amazing events at Krakatoa in 1883 date to May 20 when there were initial rumblings and venting from the volcano, which had been dormant for about 200 years. Over the next three months, there were regular small blasts from Krakatoa out of three vents. On August 11, ash started spewing from the small mountain. Eruptions got progressively stronger until August 26, when the catastrophe began. At noon, the volcano sent an ash cloud 20 miles into the air and tremors triggered several tsunamis. This turned out to be just a small indication, however, of what would follow the next day. For four-and-a-half hours beginning at 5:30 a.m. on August 27, there were four major and incredibly powerful eruptions. The last of these made the loudest sound ever recorded on the planet. It could be heard as far away as central Australia and the island of Rodrigues, 3,000 miles from Krakatoa. The air waves created by the eruption were detected at points all over the earth. The eruption had devastating effects on the islands near Krakatoa. It set off tremendous tsunamis that overwhelmed hundreds of villages on the coasts of Java and Sumatra. Water pushed inland several miles in certain places, with coral blocks weighing 600 tons ending up on shore. At least 35,000 people died, though exact numbers were impossible to determine. The tsunamis traveled nearly around the world--unusually high waves were noticed thousands of miles away the next day. The volcano threw so much rock, ash and pumice into the atmosphere that, in the immediate area, the sun was virtually blocked out for a couple of days. Within a couple of weeks, the sun appeared in strange colors to people all over the world because of all the fine dust in the stratosphere. Over the ensuing three months, the debris high in the sky produced vivid red sunsets. In one case, fire engines in Poughkeepsie, New York, were dispatched when people watching a sunset were sure that they were seeing a fire in the distance. Further, there is speculation that Edvard Munch's 1893 painting "The Scream" depicting a psychedelic sunset may have actually been a faithful rendering of what Munch saw in Norway in the years following the eruption of Krakatoa. The amount of dust in the atmosphere also filtered enough sun and heat that global temperatures fell significantly for a couple of years. Krakatoa was left only a tiny fraction of its former self. However, in the intervening years, a small island, Anak Krakatoa ("Son of Krakatoa") has arisen from the sea. It is growing at an average of five inches every week. This island is receiving a great deal of scientific attention, as it represents a chance to see how island ecosystems are established from scratch.
Tags: History 
Added: 4th December 2014
Views: 1104
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Posted By: WestVirginiaRebel
Cover of Vogue Magazine 1893 Halloween (yes, i start early!) . . i really think this is a great (and freaky) cover . . it's the little devils (pun intended) at the top of the mirror that get to me!
Tags: vogue  magazine  cover      halloween      1893 
Added: 5th October 2008
Views: 1676
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Posted By: Teresa
Penny Postcards In 1873 American postmaster John Creswell introduced the first pre-stamped penny postcards. These first postcards depicted the Interstate Industrial Exposition that took place in Chicago that year. The postcards were made because people were looking for an easier way to send quick notes. They were an instant hit with the public. The first postcard to be printed as a souvenir in the United States was created in 1893 to advertise the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago. The Post Office was the only establishment allowed to print postcards, and it held its monopoly until May 19, 1898, when Congress passed the Private Mailing Card Act which allowed private publishers and printers to produce postcards. Initially, the United States government prohibited private companies from calling their cards 'postcards,' so they were instead known as 'souvenir cards.' To adhere to the law, these cards had to be labeled 'Private Mailing Cards.' This prohibition was finally rescinded in December 24, 1901 when private companies could legally use the word 'postcard' as they pleased. The golden age of American postcards lasted until 1915. In 1908 alone, more than 677 million postcards were mailed in the United States. Below is a sample from 1905.
Tags: penny  postcards 
Added: 1st November 2010
Views: 1762
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Posted By: Lava1964

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