Welcome Guest! YouRememberThat.com is 100% FREE & fast to join! Upload, comment, create your own profile and more!



Check our brand new site TheRetroSite , although YouRememberThat will remain for quite some time we expect this new site to be our new home. Click over and create your account on the new mobile friendly and flexible site today!
Tinker to Evers to Chance Back in the day when sports writing was at its gaudy peak, scribes often used poetry in their description of people and events. The most famous sports poem is likely this one penned by Franklin P. Adams: These are the saddest of possible words: 'Tinker to Evers to Chance.' Trio of bear cubs, and fleeter than birds, Tinker and Evers and Chance. Ruthlessly pricking our gonfalon bubble, Making a Giant hit into a double Words that are heavy with nothing but trouble: 'Tinker to Evers to Chance.' This work was first published as 'That Double Play Again' in the July 12, 1910, New York Evening Mail. The Chicago Daily Tribune reprinted it as 'Gotham's Woe' on July 15, 1910. Three days later, on July 18, the New York Evening Mail republished it under the title by which it is best known today, 'Baseball's Sad Lexicon.' It described the double-play artistry of Chicago Cubs when the team was in its heyday in the first decade of the 20th century. (Yes, the Cubs actually had a heyday.) Second baseman Joe Tinker, shortstop Johnny Evers, and first baseman Frank Chance first played together in 1902. Although the poetic lament was accurate, the Cubs' famed trio never came close to leading the National League in double plays at any time. Nevertheless all three were inducted into the Hall of fame in 1946 largely because of Franklin Adams' doggerel. Based on sheer statistics, probably only Frank Chance deserves to be there. Although all three ballplayers are long dead, their double play prowess has been referenced in numerous literary works, movies, and TV shows as varied as Hogan's Heroes and The Brady Bunch.
Tags: baseball  Tinker  Evers  Chance  Chicago  Cubs 
Added: 4th January 2011
Views: 2290
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Posted by: Lava1964 on 2011-01-05 
Below is what it looks like in true poetic form. In some versions, the word 'ruthlessly' has been changed to 'thoughtlessly' and the line of 'Tinker and Evers and Chance' has been switched to match the other 'Tinker to Evers to Chance' lines.

These are the saddest of possible words:
'Tinker to Evers to Chance.'
Trio of bear cubs, and fleeter than birds,
Tinker and Evers and Chance.
Ruthlessly pricking our gonfalon bubble,
Making a Giant hit into a double Words that are heavy with nothing but trouble:
'Tinker to Evers to Chance.'
Posted by: Pfc on 2011-01-05 
Woohoo Lava is back!

What are they standing on? It looks like athletic supporters.
Posted by: Lava1964 on 2011-01-05 
They look like athletic supporters to me, but upon further thought, I think they are the type of garters men once used to hold up their socks. It looks like it's an ad for a garter company.
Posted by: NedBraden on 2011-01-07 
This prompted the classic trivia question, Who was the third baseman in this Cubs infield?, the answer to which formed the title of a baseball trivia book. I guess not too many balls were hit to the left side of the Cubs infield, because he neither was mentioned in a poem nor elected to the Hall of Fame.
Posted by: Lava1964 on 2011-01-07 
I might as well answer the related trivia question, Ned: Harry Steinfeldt was the Cubs' third baseman who was not mentioned in Franklin P. Adams' famous poem.
Posted by: Ellawillum334 on 2020-12-22 


Duke and Lord Publishers is a UK-based publishing house offering the https://www.dukeandlordpublishers.com/about-us in Medical Sciences, Business Finance, and Management Sciences. Our https://www.dukeandlordpublishers.com/ dynasty will help you to express your research paper in a format and a structure that can attract the evaluators. Duke Lord Publishers follow the global standards to maintain the high quality in research formats.
Add A Comment
Sorry, guests can't post comments!