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Luz Long Helps Jesse Owens At the 1936 Berlin Olympics, Jesse Owens won four gold medals. His toughest struggle was in the long jump. Owens was the overwhelming favorite to win the event, but he fouled on his first two attempts. A third foul would eliminate him. Germany's Luz Long, the European long jump champion, went out of his way to assist the discouraged Owens. Long (who had set a new Olympic record with one of his qualifying jumps) informed Owens that he could easily qualify for the finals by leaping several inches behind the foul line. Owens followed Long's advice--leaping with at least four inches to spare--and qualified for the long jump finals. In the finals, the Olympic record was broken five times. Owens had the longest leap and won the gold medal. Long was the first to congratulate him. Owens and Long became friends. Long was killed serving with the German army in Sicily in 1943. Long was posthumously awarded the Coubertin Medal for Sportsmanship by the IOC. After the war, Long's widow and son continued to regularly correspond with Owens until his death in 1973.
Tags: 1936  Olympics  Luz  Long  Jesse  Owens  long  jump 
Added: 12th July 2013
Views: 1333
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Vanishing TV Character - Kate Bradley Petticoat Junction was one of CBS' rural-themed hit shows of the 1960s. Set in a quaint hotel outside of Hooterville, it fared best in the ratings during its first two seasons (1963 to 1965) when it was filmed in black and white. Although there were numerous cast changes during the show's run--for example, three different actresses played oldest daughter Billie Jo Bradley--the linchpin of Petticoat Junction was family matriarch Kate Bradley, a kindly widow played by veteran TV and radio actress Bea Benaderet. Kate was the voice of reason in most episodes who kept order in both the Shady Rest Hotel and among her family members. In early 1968 Benaderet was stricken with cancer and took a leave of absence. At one point she appeared in just three of 11 episodes. Kate's absence was explained as her being away on a long trip. After initially good medical reports, Benaderet was kept in the Petticoat Junction cast. However, when the 1968-69 season was to begin, Benaderet's cancer returned and she was too ill to continue her role as Kate Bradley. In a few episodes only her voice was heard. In some cases a double was used in scene in which Kate was only seen from the rear. Benaderet died on October 13, 1968, but her character never really died on the show. On a few episodes, she was seen in flashbacks. Although June Lockhart joined the cast as its new older female character, Kate Bradley was never mentioned as being deceased, but she was seldom mentioned after 1969. Only once in the final season was Kate even alluded to: Youngest daughter Betty Jo explained that she and her sisters were taught to swim in the train's water tank by Kate. Petticoat Junction was cancelled after the 1969-70 season. The Mary Tyler Moore Show replaced it in the CBS lineup on Saturday nights.
Tags: TV  Petticoat  Junction  Kate  Bradley  Bea  Benederet 
Added: 4th November 2014
Views: 1627
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Life With Lucy - Opening Credits After being away from sitcoms for 12 years, Lucille Ball returned to TV in the fall of 1986 with great fanfare at age 75 as the star of the ABC comedy Life With Lucy. (Here is the opening montage. The theme song was performed by Eydie Gorme.) Madelyn Davis and Bob Carroll, who had written scripts for I Love Lucy, were the show's producers. The premise of the show was that the recently widowed Lucy Barker decides to help out at the hardware store her husband ran. The only problem was she had had nothing to do with the store while her husband was alive, so she was clueless about everything. Eighty-year-old Gale Gordon also came out of retirement to play Lucy's husband's business partner Curtis McGibbon. Lucy had just moved in with her daughter Margo's family. Margo was married to Curtis's son, a law student. At the end of the first episode Curtis moves into the same house too. Got it? After a decent showing in the ratings for the first episode, Life With Lucy steadily plummeted downward. Even guest appearances by John Ritter and Audrey Meadows failed to halt the show's decline. After eight weeks it was dismally ranked 73rd out of 76 shows. Even though ABC had committed to 22 episodes, the scripts for 14 shows had been written, and 13 had been filmed, ABC pulled the plug after the eighth episode aired. Lucy was said to have been heartbroken that the public no longer wanted to see her on TV. She died about 30 months later.
Tags: Life  With  Lucy  sitcom  Lucille  Ball 
Added: 5th February 2015
Views: 989
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Vanishing TV Character - Bub OCasey My Three Sons was one of televisions's longest-running sitcoms, airing 380 episodes over 12 seasons. It first aired on ABC from 1960 through 1965 and then on CBS from 1965 through 1972. The premise of the show was that Stephen Douglas (played by Fred MacMurray) was a widowed aeronautical engineer with three sons whose ages spanned about 12 years. We never learn much about his deceased wife--not even her first name. With Stephen Douglas often busy, his father-in-law, crusty but good-natured Bub O'Casey, was brought into the family fold to be the equivalent of the 'mother': the person who would cook, clean, shop, do laundry, mend clothes, and so forth. Bub was played by William Frawley who had earlier gained TV fame as Fred Mertz on I Love Lucy in the 1950s. The show was immediately popular but never quite managed to crack the Nielsen top 10 in ratings. Fred MacMurray, who was once the highest paid actor in Hollywood, only agreed to be in the show if he could shoot all his scenes in three months. ABC agreed to this unusual demand. This meant the scripts for an entire season had to be prepared so MacMurray's scenes could all be shot over the space of three months and then pieced together with scenes involving only the other cast members who had a standard shooting schedule. Four seasons into the show, a problem arose: Frawley's health was declining to the point where ABC could not get him insured in case it had to pay for an entire season of episodes to be re-shot with a replacement if Frawley died or was incapacitated by illness. Thus ABC felt it was financially prudent to unceremoniously drop Frawley from the cast midway through the 1964-65 season. (It was explained that Bub had gone to Ireland to look after his 104-year-old Aunt Katie.) Enter William Demarest, who took on the role of Charley O'Casey--Bub's seafaring brother. He was persuaded to become the new Mr. Mom at the Douglas home and proved to be even more grumpy than Bub, but just as lovable deep down. Bub was seldom mentioned again once Uncle Charley entered the scene. Apparently Frawley resented Demarest for replacing him in the cast. Because only the 1965 to 1970 episodes are widely syndicated, many newer fans of My Three Sons are utterly unaware of Bub O'Casey. The insurance concerns were very valid: Frawley died suddenly in March 1966 at age 79.
Tags: Bub  OCasey  My  Three  Sons  William  Frawley 
Added: 9th March 2015
Views: 2197
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Vanishing TV Character - Mike Douglas The family-based sitcom My Three Sons ran for 12 seasons on two networks from 1960 through 1972. Originally the widowed Steve Douglas' three sons in the sitcom's title were Mike, Robbie, and Chip. Tim Considine played eldest son Mike, a level-headed, responsible young man who could be counted on to keep his younger brothers in line. The show was shot in black and white for the first five seasons when it ran on ABC. In the fifth season, Tim meets Sally Morrison (played by the lovely Meredith MacRae), who works in the secretarial pool at his father's firm. They quickly develop a romance. However, at that time Considine's relationship with the producers of My Three Sons was fraying and he did not want to return for the show's sixth season in 1965. This obviously created a problem for a show about three sons. A solution was devised: Mike and Sally would be married and move away. The plot had Mike becoming an assistant psychology professor somewhere "back east"--even though the Douglases lived in Maryland. Considine and MacRae appeared in the opening few minutes of the first episode of the 1965-66 season--which also happened to be the show's first episode on CBS and the first one to be shot in color. The opening scene had the newly married couple leaving the church and accepting the congratulations and good wishes of the wedding guests. Mike takes his dad aside and lovingly thanks him for everything in his life. He gets into a car with his new bride--and leaves the show forever. Mike was only mentioned a couple of times thereafter even though My Three Sons ran for another seven years. Oh, yes: an orphaned friend of Chip's, Ernie, is adopted into the Douglas clan so that Steve again has three sons under his roof. Since the color episodes were the only ones widely circulated, many My Three Sons fans who were first exposed to the show in reruns often have little knowledge about Mike being one of Steve Douglas' sons.
Tags: Tim  Considine  My  Three  Sons  Mike  Douglas 
Added: 15th June 2015
Views: 1121
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Thats My Mama - Failed Sitcom ABC had high hopes for the sitcom That's My Mama when it debuted in the fall of 1974. This clip shows the bland opening credits from the first season. The sitcom was set in a middle-class black section of Washington, D.C. It featured Clifton Davis as Clifton Curtis, a youthful barber who was the proprietor of a shop he inherited from his late father. Theresa Merritt played his widowed mother, Eloise. Slotted on Wednesday nights directly against against NBC's Little House on the Prairie, the sitcom failed to crack the Nielsen top 30 at any time during its first season and was nearly axed. Still thinking it had potential, ABC kept it on for part of a second season. When ratings did not improve, That's My Mama was terminated after its 39th episode aired on December 17, 1975--although a rerun was shown the following week. The sitcom did, however, launch the career of Ted Lange, who played the roll of Clifton's flamboyant friend, Junior. Lange went on to bigger and better things as bartender Isaac Washington on The Love Boat.
Tags: Thats  My  Mama  Clifton  Davis  Theresa  Merritt  Ted  Lange  ABC  sitcom 
Added: 3rd November 2015
Views: 930
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Iconic Depression-Era Photo Thirty-two-year-old Florence Owens Thomson became the face of the Great Depression after she was photographed by Dorothea Lange in 1936. Lange, a photographer of some repute, had been hired by the federal government to capture images of how the hard times of the 1930 were affecting Americans. The photo--which Lange titled "Migrant Mother"--did not identify Thompson by name, only that she was a 32-year-old widowed mother of seven children who was among at least 2,500 transient and destitute people seeking menial work as a pea picker in a California camp. The compelling photo was widely reproduced in newspapers across the continent and Thompson was subsequently identified. She died in 1983 at age 80.
Tags: Depression  photo  Florence  Owens  Thompson  Dorothea  Lange 
Added: 9th November 2015
Views: 801
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Chuck Hughes - 1971 NFL Fatality Despite its obvious inherent violence, the National Football League has only ever had one fatality occur on the field since it first began play in 1921--and it occurred from an undiagnosed heart ailment rather than from a bone-jarring collision. On October 24, 1971, Chuck Hughes of the Detroit Lions died during the final two minutes of a home game at Tiger Stadium versus the Chicago Bears. Hughes was born in Pennsylvania in 1943 but grew up in Texas with his 14 siblings. He set several school records for pass receiving at Texas Western University. He had spotty NFL career that began with the Philadelphia Eagles. By 1971 Hughes was used mostly as a special teams player and occasionally at wide receiver. On that fateful day Hughes collapsed while returning to the Lions' huddle following a play that did not involve him. Before his collapse it had been a very uneventful game for Hughes. The Bears held a 28-23 lead in a see-saw battle when the Lions got the ball back for one last drive toward the end zone. With under two minutes to go, Lions' quarterback Greg Landry dropped back and found Hughes on a crossing pattern for a 32-yard gain. He was sandwiched and brought down by two Bear defenders at the Chicago 37-yard line. Unhurt, Hughes popped up immediately and ran back to the Detroit huddle. It was the fifteenth and last catch of Chuck Hughes' career. After two straight incompletions Hughes was walking slowly back to the line of scrimmage when he suddenly grabbed his chest and fell to the ground. Some fans initially thought that Hughes might be faking an injury to give the Lions more time to devise their next play. But everyone in the stadium quickly became aware that something was terribly wrong when they saw Chicago's Dick Butkus waving his arms frantically at the Detroit bench and yelling for help. Team doctors Edward Guise and Richard Thompson rushed onto the field in an attempt to revive the lifeless Hughes. Guise began mouth-to-mouth resuscitation while Thompson performed CPR. They were joined by Dr. Eugene Boyle, an anesthesiologist from Gross Pointe, MI, who descended from the stands. It was all to no avail. Hughes was pronounced dead at Henry Ford Hospital. He was 28. The photo of the incident shown here led many people to wrongly believe that Dick Butkus had administered a fatal blow to Hughes. Hughes' cause of death was declared to be a coronary thrombosis, which caused a massive myocardial infarction which cut off the blood flow to his heart. Hughes had had concerns about chest pains weeks before October 24, but a medical examination turned up nothing amiss. Hughes' family eventually sued Henry Ford Hospital for malpractice and was given an out-of-court settlement. Hughes left behind a young widow and a son who was not quite two years old. The Lions have retired Hughes' jersey #85.
Tags: NFL  fatality  Chuck  Hughes  1971 
Added: 23rd November 2015
Views: 2170
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Bomb Destroys CA Flight 11 - 1962 On Tuesday, May 22, 1962 a deadly act of madness caused Continental Airlines Flight #11 to be blown out of the sky. Eight crew members and 37 passengers perished. To date it is the worst airline disaster ever to occur in the skies over Missouri. The doomed flight departed Chicago's O'Hare Airport at 8:35 p.m. for Kansas City, MO. At the last second, Thomas G. Doty arrived at the departure gate. Although the airplane doors had been closed--and airline policy prohibits doors from being reopened--the doors were improperly reopened and Doty was permitted to board the aircraft. The flight was absolutely routine until the plane approached the Mississippi River. At that point the pilot informed air traffic control that he was deviating from the planned course to avoid severe thunderstorms in the area. In the vicinity of Centerville, IA, the radar image of the aircraft suddenly disappeared from the scope of Flight Following Service in Waverly, IA. It had nothing to do with inclement weather. At approximately 9:17 p.m. an explosion occurred in the right rear lavatory resulting in separation of the airplane's tail section from the fuselage. The remaining aircraft structure pitched nose-down violently, causing the engines to tear off, after which it fell into uncontrollable gyrations. The fuselage of the Boeing 707, minus the aft 38 feet, and with part of the left and most of the right wing intact, struck an alfalfa field on the ground. Most of the fuselage was found near Unionville, MO, but the engines and parts of the tail section and left wing were found up to six miles away from the main wreckage area. Of the 45 individuals on board, 44 were already dead when rescuers reached the crash site. One passenger, 27-year-old Takehiko Nakano of Evanston, IL, was barely alive when rescuers found him among the wreckage, but he later succumbed to fatal internal injuries. Another victim, Fred P. Herman, was a recipient of the United States Medal of Freedom. In their investigation of the crash, FBI agents discovered that late-arriving passenger Thomas G. Doty, a married man with a five-year-old daughter, had purchased a life insurance policy from Mutual of Omaha for $150,000, the maximum available. He further augmented that coverage with a flight insurance policy worth another $150,000 that he purchased just before departure. Doty had recently been arrested for armed robbery and was to soon face a preliminary hearing in the matter. Investigators determined that Doty had purchased six sticks of dynamite--at 29 cents apiece--shortly before the flight. An examination of the wreckage determined that Doty's dynamite bomb was detonated in the lavatory. His motive was purely financial: His wife and daughter would be able to collect $300,000 of life insurance. His widow attempted to collect on the insurance, but when Doty's death was ruled a suicide, the policies were voided.
Tags: crime  bomb  air  disaster  Flight  11 
Added: 15th December 2015
Views: 1523
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Flo - Sitcom Spinoff Disaster The popular CBS sitcom Alice, which ran from 1976 to 1985, was loosely based on the successful 1974 film Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore. The plot had recently widowed Alice Hyatt (played by Linda Lavin) taking a waitress job in Mel's Diner, a Phoenix eatery, to make ends meet. One of her waitress colleagues was feisty Florence (Flo) Castleberry played by Polly Holliday. The character became so popular that CBS launched a sitcom focusing on Flo. The premise of the spinoff was that Flo had moved back home to Cowtown, Texas to assume the management of a rundown roadhouse which she re-christened Flo's Yellow Rose. As a mid-season replacement, Flo aired on Monday nights in March and April 1980 and got as high as number seven in the Neilsen ratings. However, when Flo returned in the fall of 1980 its time slot was moved several times. Ratings tanked and it was gone after a total of 29 episodes. The Flo character never returned to Alice (with the exception of old clips in the series finale). Here is the opening montage of Flo.
Tags: Flo  CBS  sitcom  spinoff  Alice 
Added: 10th July 2017
Views: 834
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

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