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Monty Python and the Holy Grail The first Python film of wholly original material, released in 1975. So many memorable scenes and characters!
Tags: monty  python  film 
Added: 13th July 2007
Views: 2190
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Posted By: Bamber
              CREEDENCE CLEARWATER REVIVAL   When the Beatles announced their break up in the winter of 1970, CCR became the most successful band and the biggest singles act in the world, despite never landing a #1 single. Always very private, the group never became stars personally to befit their status on the pop charts. They sought to change that with the release of Pendulum. Before the album's release, they had a fan type book written. Called "Inside Creedence", the book took about six weeks from the time it was conceived until it was actually published, coincidental with the release of Pendulum. In fact, many copies of the book were sold packaged with the record. The band also made a television special and had a $30,000 press junket to ballyhoo the album. The record shipped a million copies. Here's a clip in Concert playing Who'll Stop The Rain."
Tags: creedence  clearwater  survival  wholl  stop  the  rain  music  1970s 
Added: 28th September 2007
Views: 3491
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Posted By: Guido
1924 Olympic Hockey Tournament The inaugural Winter Olympic Games in Chamonix, France in 1924 featured a hockey tournament that was far from competitive. The two North American teams handily crushed all European opposition. The eight-team event had Canada in one four-team pool and the United States in the other. The Canadians, comprised of amateur players solely from Toronto, won their first three games by ridiculous scores of 30-0, 33-0, and 22-0 versus Czecholslovakia, Switzerland, and Sweden respectively. The Americans were having an equally easy time vanquishing Belgium, France and Great Britain by a combined score of 65-0. In the semifinals Canada thumped Great Britain 19-2 while the United States whipped Sweden 20-0. Canada beat the US 6-1 in the gold-medal match. None of the champion Canadians ever played pro hockey. Canada's performance was so daunting that at the 1928 Winter Olympics, the Canadians were awarded an automatic bye to the finals while the other 10 teams battled each other to see which nation would get the honor of being pummelled. Switzerland emerged from the pack as the challenger--and promptly lost 11-0 to a team wholly comprised of students from the University of Toronto.
Tags: 1924  Olympic  ice  hockey  tourney 
Added: 4th February 2014
Views: 595
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Posted By: Lava1964
1915 Scottish Railroad Disaster The worst railroad disaster in history occurred on May 22, 1915 near Gretna Green, Dumfriesshire, Scotland. It is commonly known as the Quintinshill Disaster, having been named for the location of a nearby intermediate signal box with passing loops on each side on the Caledonian Railway Main Line linking Glasgow and Carlisle. The crash, which involved five trains, killed a probable 226 people and injured 246 others. Those killed were mainly territorial soldiers from the Royal Scots heading for the Gallipoli front in the First World War. The precise number of dead was never established with certainty as the roll list of the regiment was destroyed by the fire. The crash occurred when a troop train travelling from Larbert, Stirlingshire to Liverpool, Lancashire collided with a local passenger train that had been shunted on to the main line, to then be hit by an express train to Glasgow which crashed into the wreckage a minute later. Gas from the lighting system of the old wooden carriages of the troop train ignited, starting a fire which soon engulfed the three passenger trains and also two goods trains standing on nearby passing loops. A number of bodies were never recovered, having been wholly consumed by the fire. The bodies that were recovered were buried together in a mass grave in Edinburgh's Rosebank Cemetery. Such was the scope of the disaster that many of the rescuers wrongly assumed the trains had been targets of German saboteurs. Four bodies, believed to be of children, were never identified or claimed and are buried in the Western Necropolis, Glasgow. The cause of the accident was poor working practices on the part of the two signalmen involved. It was discovered that the two men often colluded to falsify their records of when they relieved each other, routinely did not follow regulations properly, and engaged in other unsafe practices. The results of the official inquiry into the disaster led to their imprisonment for culpable homicide after legal proceedings in both Scotland and England. A memorial to the dead soldiers was erected soon after the accident. There are a number of more recent memorials at various locations. An annual remembrance service is held at Rosebank Cemetery.
Tags: Scotland  1915  train  disaster 
Added: 13th December 2014
Views: 706
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Posted By: Lava1964
Forbes Field Picturesque Forbes Field was the home ballpark of the National League's Pittsburgh Pirates from 1909 to 1970. It was one of the first modern type ballparks made wholly of steel and concrete. It also was the first to have telephones in the press box and elevators. The first player to smack a home run over the double-decked right field grandstand was Babe Ruth in 1935. Undoubtedly the most famous home run in Forbes Field's history was socked by Bill Mazeroski to win the 1960 World Series. Every October 13, Pirate fans gather at the former site of Forbes Field (which has been absorbed by the University of Pittsburgh) to listen to the broadcast of that famous game on its anniversary. One strange fact about Forbes Field: Despite it being considered a pitcher's ballpark, a no-hitter was never thrown there.
Tags: Forbes  Field  Pittburgh  Pirates  baseball 
Added: 28th June 2008
Views: 1375
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Posted By: Lava1964
Deanna Durbin 1921-2013 It has been reported that Deanna Durbin, who first attained Hollywood stardom as a teen star in the 1930s, has died at age 91. Durbin had been pretty much a recluse since retiring from films at age 29. In 1939, Durbin and fellow teen star Mickey Rooney were presented special Academy Awards for their “significant contribution in bringing to the screen the spirit and personification of youth …” At the time of her presentation, Durbin had appeared in only four films, such was her star power. By the end of the 1930, the Winnipeg-born Durbin had become one of the biggest box-office stars of the period. Accounts circulated that she saved Universal from bankruptcy, although that was not wholly accurate; however, it was estimated that her films' earnings accounted for 17 percent of the studio's revenue during a period late in the decade. During World War II, Durbin was named the favorite of more than 300 different groups of servicemen. Reportedly, she was Winston Churchill's favorite movie star, and the British Prime Minister was allowed to see her films before they were released to the general public in Great Britain. Following crucial British victories, Churchill would celebrate by re-screening her 1937 film One Hundred Men and a Girl, accompanied by brandy and a cigar. Durbin assessed her popularity, especially among older men, in matter-of-fact terms: “I represented the ideal daughter millions of fathers and mothers wished they had.” In 1949, at the height of her worldwide fame, Durbin quit the movie business. The following year, she moved to France and left the public eye. She lived outside of Paris with her third husband, French director/film executive Charles David, who had directed her in Lady on a Train (1945). At the time of her retirement at age 29, Durbin was the highest-paid female screen star in Hollywood and, accordingly, the highest-paid woman in the world.
Tags: Hollywood  Deanna  Durbin  obit 
Added: 1st May 2013
Views: 629
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Posted By: Lava1964
Ray Bourque Gives Jersey to Espo It was one of the classiest incidents in sports history. Here's the background: Phil Esposito had set numerous league and team scoring records during his tenure with the NHL's Boston Bruins from 1967 to 1975. Espo was traded to the New York Rangers in November 1975. In 1979 rookie sensation Ray Bourque was given the #7 jersey by the Bruins. He wore it reluctantly knowing that Phil Esposito was so closely associated with it. On December 3, 1987, the Bruins retired Esposito's #7 jersey but counted on Bourque to continue to wear it. Bourque, however, had other ideas. He figured the retirement ceremony was an ideal time to return #7 wholly to Espo. Only a handful of people knew what Bourque was going to do. In a surprising and touching gesture, Bourque removed his #7 jersey to reveal his new #77 jersey that he wore for the rest of his days in Boston. Esposito was clearly moved by Bourque's selfless gesture.
Tags: Phil  Esposito    retirement  ceremony  hockey  Ray  Bourque 
Added: 9th November 2013
Views: 1179
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Posted By: Lava1964
1927 Snyder-Judd Murder Case It is barely known today, but in 1927 the public was fascinated with the Snyder-Judd murder case. It was unsurpassed in media coverage until the 1936 trial of Bruno Hauptmann for the Lindbergh baby's kidnapping and murder. In 1925, Ruth Snyder, an unhappy housewife from Queens Village in New York City, began an affair with Henry Judd Gray, a married corset salesman. Stuck in a loveless marriage, Snyder began to plan the murder of her husband, Albert, enlisting the help of her new lover, though he appeared to be very reluctant. (Ruth's distaste for her husband apparently began two days after their marriage when he insisted on hanging a picture of his late fiancée, Jessie Guishard, on the wall of their first home. He also named his boat after her!) Ruth Snyder persuaded her husband to purchase an insurance policy that paid double indemnity if an unexpected act of violence killed him. According to Judd Gray, Ruth had earlier made at least seven attempts to kill her husband, all of which he survived. The culprits were not exactly criminal masterminds. On March 20, 1927, the couple garrotted Albert Snyder in his bed and stuffed his nose full of chloroform-soaked rags, then clumsily staged his death as part of a burglary. Detectives at the scene noted that the burglar left little evidence of breaking into the house. The behavior of Mrs. Snyder was wholly inconsistent with her story of a terrorized wife witnessing her husband being killed. Police quickly found the property Ruth claimed had been stolen hidden under the mattress of her own bed. A breakthrough came when a detective found a paper with the letters "J.G." on it. (It was a memento Albert Snyder had kept from former love Jessie Guishard.) They asked Ruth about it. Flustered, Ruth's mind immediately turned to her own lover, whose initials were also "J.G.," and asked the detective what "Judd Gray had to do with this." It was the first time Gray had been mentioned, and the police were instantly suspicious. Gray was located in Syracuse, NY. He claimed he had been there all night, but eventually it turned out a friend of his had created an alibi, setting up Gray's room at a hotel. Gray proved far more forthcoming than Ruth about his actions. He was arrested because his railroad ticket stub was found in his hotel wastebasket! Furthermore, Gray had escaped the murder scene by taking a taxi from Manhattan to Long Island. The cabbie easily remembered Gray because he had only tipped the driver a nickel on a $3.50 fare. He was charged with first-degree murder along with Ruth Snyder. Snyder and Gray blamed each other for plotting the murder. Both were convicted and died in Sing Sing prison's electric chair on January 12, 1928. Snyder was the first woman executed in New York state since 1899. This photo, illegally snapped by a New York Daily News photographer with a hidden camera, was taken at the moment when Snyder was jolted by the electric charge. The Snyder-Judd murder case inspired at least one play and two Hollywood movies: The Postman Always Rings Twice and Double Indemnity.
Tags: murder  Snyder-Judd  case 
Added: 26th November 2013
Views: 1302
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Posted By: Lava1964

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