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Boston Bruins - 1972 Stanley Cup Champs I posted this on the CBC News website in Canada following the Boston Bruins' Stanley Cup championship on June 15, 2011. It got such a wonderful response that I thought I'd share it here too: It had been 14,279 days since captain Johnny Bucyk hoisted the Boston Bruins' last Stanley Cup on May 11, 1972. To put things in perspective... Richard Nixon was in the White House. America still had combat troops in Vietnam. If you bought a quarter's worth of candy, you could get sick eating it all. Pitchers still batted in the American League. There was no such thing as rap music or punk rock. Nobody considered the possibility of terrorist attacks at the Olympics. The NHL had 14 teams. Few players wore helmets. Some goalies didn't wear masks. Nobody seriously thought hockey players from the USSR were good. There were hardly any McDonald's Restaurants in Canada. There were very few Tim Hortons either. Archie Bunker was in his heyday. Television sets had rabbit ears. Nobody thought the world was in peril from global warming or climate change or whatever they're calling it this week. Lotteries were illegal in Canada. Arthur Godfrey Time had still been on the radio two weeks earlier. Calculators could perform four functions and cost $179. Most people had rotary telephones. Forget about DVD players--VCRs didn't exist. The idea of bottled water would have been laughable. Computers were enormous things that occupied entire rooms and did simple calculations using punch cards. Hardware meant hammers and wrenches. Software didn't mean anything. People still sent telegrams. Life Magazine was still around. Canada still had the death penalty. O.J. Simpson was a hero. The Lord's Prayer was recited in public schools. Nobody thought it was wrong. A new car cost $2500. Hockey cards were a dime a pack--and they came with pink bubble gum covered in powdered sugar. Bobby Orr was the greatest player in the NHL. (Thirty-nine years later he's still the greatest of all time.).
Tags: hockey  Boston  Bruins  1972  Stanley  Cup 
Added: 16th June 2011
Views: 1343
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Posted By: Lava1964
Blanskys Beauties - 1977 Sitcom Flop After being part of two successful TV series in the early 1970s, Nancy Walker had two sitcoms in which she played the starring role cancelled in the same 1976-77 TV season. In September 1976, The Nancy Walker Show premiered. In it Walker played talent agent Nancy Kitteridge who was learning to live with her husband who had been away at sea for most of their 29-year marriage. The show bombed and was cancelled before New Year's Day. Undeterred, ABC cast Walker in another sitcom. This time she played Howard Cunningham's visiting cousin Nancy Blansky from Las Vegas on the February 4, 1977 episode of Happy Days. Blansky's Beauties premiered eight days later. In this show Nancy Blansky was a Las Vegas showbiz vet and current den mother to a bevy of beautiful showgirls. In addition to keeping order in the chaotic apartment complex where they all lived, Nancy staged the girls' big numbers at the Oasis Hotel. (Strangely, the Happy Days episode on which Nancy first appeared took place circa 1960, yet Blansky's Beauties was set in 1977.) Sixteen-year-old Scott Baio played the role of a "12-year-old going on 28." Eddie Mekka from Laverne and Shirley was also part of the cast. Blansky's Beauties ran for just 13 weeks before being axed. Recalled once critic, "This show had every 1970s teeny bopper element aimed to appeal to the lowest intellect and thus make it a hit--except this time cute boys and inane, jiggly, dumb blondes were not enough to cover for horrible scripts, contrived situations, bad acting, and unbelievable plots. The show tried to be a spin-off/tie-in to Happy Days and Laverne and Shirley (or at least ride on their successes) by utilizing actors - most notably Eddie Mekka and Scott Baio - from those shows and making the title role the cousin of Happy Days' Howard Cunningham. Having Nancy Walker as its star, scantily-clad bimbos wiggling around the set, and pretty boy co-stars to elicit screams from young girls in the audience, however, could never have saved it from itself. This show is a best-forgotten footnote to bad television."
Tags: Blanskys  Beauties  sitcom  flop  ABC  spinoff   
Added: 20th August 2011
Views: 1231
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Posted By: Lava1964
Baseball Broadcaster Tom Cheek Tom Cheek was the smooth radio voice of the Toronto Blue Jays from the team's inception in 1977 until 2004. Largely unknown outside of Canada, his most famous call was of Joe Carter's World Series-winning home run in 1993: "Touch 'em all, Joe! You'll never hit a bigger home run in your life!" Remarkably, Cheek never missed a single Jays' broadcast until June 4, 2004 when he had to attend his father's funeral. His absence that night ended his streak of 4,306 consecutive regular-season games at the mike. Sadly, less than two weeks after his father's death, Cheek was diagnosed with a cancerous brain tumor. He left the broadcast booth to undergo treatment. He made only sporadic appearances at Jays' games after that. He did have a Lou Gehrig-type farewell appearance at Toronto's SkyDome in September 2004. The ceremony was sad and poignant. (Ken Singleton, a New York Yankees announcer, was so teary that he had to leave the broadcast booth.) Cheek died in October 2005 at the age of 66. He is honored in the Blue Jays' "Ring of Honor" at the SkyDome (now known as Rogers Centre) alongside the number 4,306.
Tags: Tom  Cheek  baseball  Toronto  Blue  Jays  announcer 
Added: 16th January 2012
Views: 603
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Posted By: Lava1964
Last Female WWI veteran dies Florence Patterson Green never saw the front line. Her war was spent serving food, not dodging bullets. But Green, who died on February 4, 2012, aged 110, was the last known surviving veteran of World War I. She was serving with the Women's Royal Air Force as a waitress at an air base in eastern England when the guns fell silent on November 11, 1918. It was not until 2010 that she was officially recognized as a veteran after a researcher found her service record in Britain's National Archives. Green died Saturday at the Briar House Care Home in King's Lynn, eastern England, two weeks before her 111th birthday, the home said. Retired Air Vice-Marshal Peter Dye, director-general of the RAF Museum, said it was fitting that the last survivor of the first global war was someone who had served on the home front. "In a way, that the last veteran should be a lady and someone who served on the home front is something that reminds me that warfare is not confined to the trenches," Dye said. "It reminds us of the Great War, and all warfare since then has been something that involved everyone. It's a collective experience ... Sadly, whether you are in New York, in London, or in Kandahar, warfare touches all of our lives." She was born Florence Beatrice Patterson in London on February 19, 1901, and joined the newly formed Women's Royal Air Force in September 1918 at the age of 17. The service trained women to work as mechanics, drivers and in other jobs to free men for front-line duty. Green went to work as a steward in the officers' mess, first at the Narborough airdrome and then at RAF Marham in eastern England, and was serving there when the war ended. The photo below was taken in February 2010 at a celebration of Florence's 109th birthday.
Tags: Florence  Patterson  Green  WWI  veteran 
Added: 8th February 2012
Views: 522
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Posted By: Lava1964
Jill Kinmont 1936-2012 Jill Kinmont Boothe (February 16, 1936 – February 9, 2012) was a former alpine ski racer who competed in the mid-1950s. Jill Kinmont grew up in Bishop, California, skiing and racing at Mammoth Mountain. In early 1955, she was the reigning U.S. national champion in the slalom, and a top prospect for a medal at the 1956 Winter Olympics in Cortina, Italy. While competing in the downhill at the Snow Cup in Alta, Utah on January 30, 1955, she suffered a near-fatal accident which resulted in paralysis from the neck down. It ironically occurred the same week that Kinmont, about two weeks shy of her 19th birthday, was featured on the cover of Sports Illustrated dated January 31, 1955. After her rehabilitation, she went on to graduate from UCLA with a B.A. in German and earned a teaching credentials from the University of Washington. She had a long career as an educator first in Washington and then in Beverly Hills, California. She taught special education at Bishop Union Elementary School from 1975 to 1996 in her hometown of Bishop. She was an accomplished painter who had many exhibitions of her artwork. Kinmont was the subject of two movies: The Other Side of the Mountain in 1975, and The Other Side of the Mountain Part 2 in 1978. Both films starred Marilyn Hassett as Kinmont. Jill married trucker John Boothe in November 1976, and they made their home in Bishop until her death.
Tags: SI  jinx  Jill  Kinmont  skier 
Added: 13th February 2012
Views: 5533
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Posted By: Lava1964
Hal March Hal March, born Harold Mendelson, was best known as the host of the popular 1950s quiz show The $64,000 Question from 1955 to 1958. This TV Guide cover is from August 1955 when the show was ascending to the top of the TV ratings after just three months on the air. Although no scandal was ever associated with the show, The $64,000 Question was axed in 1958 when rigging scandals involving other prime time game shows soured the public's appetite for them. March was also an actor. He appeared on a 1966 episode of The Lucy Show as a comedian whose partner was a very large monkey (played by a man in a monkey suit). March was hoping to make a comeback as a game show host in the fall of 1969 with It's Your Bet, but ill health quashed those plans. After completing about 13 weeks of tapings, March complained of weakness and tiredness. A medical exam confirmed the worst: March, a lifelong heavy smoker, had an advanced case of lung cancer. He died on January 22, 1970 at the age of 49.
Tags: Hal  March  quiz  show  host  actor 
Added: 11th March 2012
Views: 484
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Posted By: Lava1964
Canada Discontinues Pennies On May 4, 2012 Canada's Finance Minister Jim Flaherty was on hand at the Royal Canadian Mint to see the last penny roll off the line. Six weeks earlier he had announced that Canada's one-cent coin would be discontinued. An overwhelming majority of Canadians applauded the government's decision. Most felt the move was long overdue. Citing low purchasing power and rising production costs, the government decided to phase the penny out of existence starting in the fall of 2012, when the Royal Canadian Mint will stop distributing the one-cent coin to financial institutions. Over time, that will lead to the penny effectively becoming extinct, although the government noted that one-cent coins will always be accepted in cash transactions for as long as people still hold on to them. The value of the penny has decreased to about 1/20th of its purchasing power in the last 100 years. Indeed, the lowly penny has fallen so far that Ottawa described it as a "burden to the [Canadian] economy" in a pamphlet explaining the change. In part because of rising prices for the metals it's made of, it actually costs 1.6 cents to produce every penny. The government estimates it loses $11 million a year producing and distributing the penny, and that doesn't include the costs and frustrations for businesses and consumers that use them in transactions.
Tags: pennies  Canada  numismatics 
Added: 29th March 2012
Views: 637
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Posted By: Lava1964
Marion Lorne - Aunt Clara Even though Marion Lorne had five decades of stage work on her resume, she didn't become widely famous as an actress until the last few years of her life. Her occasional role as the befuddled, forgetful, and utterly lovable Aunt Clara on the sitcom Bewitched made her a TV favorite. In her episodes on the show, Clara (who was one of Samantha Stevens' relatives, and thus a witch) would unintentionally cause chaos in the Stevens household with her inability to control her spell-casting powers. Lorne was awarded a well deserved Emmy for her role in 1968. Sadly, the award came posthumusly; she had died of a heart attack at age 82 a few weeks earlier. Elizabeth Montgomery accepted the Emmy on Lorne's behalf.
Tags: Bewitched  Marion  Lorne 
Added: 27th April 2012
Views: 1117
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Posted By: Lava1964
Murder of Bob Crane - 1978 Bob Crane will forever be remembered by TV fans as the actor who played Colonel Robert Hogan in the sitcom Hogan's Heroes from 1965 to 1971. Crane was an amateur photographer. During the run of the show, co-star Richard Dawson introduced Crane to John Henry Carpenter, who worked with the video department at Sony Electronics and had access to early videotape recorders. Crane, a notorious womanizer, arranged for Carpenter to secretly and frequently photograph Crane's plentiful sexual escapades using this new technology. In 1978, Crane was appearing in Scottsdale, AZ in the play Beginner's Luck at the Windmill Dinner Theatre. On the night of June 28, Crane allegedly phoned Carpenter to tell him that their friendship was over. The following day, Crane was discovered bludgeoned to death in bed at the Winfield Place Apartments in Scottsdale. The murder weapon was never found--but police believed it to be a camera tripod. Crane was two weeks shy of his 50th birthday. Crane likely knew his assailant and was comfortable with him/her being in the room: He was known as a light sleeper and there were no signs of struggle. A bottle of scotch whiskey was found in Crane's room. Crane did not drink scotch. According to the program Cold Case Files, police at the crime scene noted that Carpenter called the apartment several times and did not seem surprised that the police were there. The car Carpenter had rented the previous day was impounded. In it, several blood smears were found that matched Crane's blood type. DNA testing, which might have confirmed that it was Crane's blood, did not exist yet. Due to insufficient evidence, Maricopa County Attorney Charles F. Hyder declined to file charges. The case was reopened in 1990, 12 years after the murder. A 1978 attempt to test the blood found in the car that Carpenter had rented resulted in a match to Bob Crane's blood type, but it failed to produce any additional results. DNA testing in 1990 could not be completed due to an insufficient remaining sample. Detectives Barry Vassall and Jim Raines instead hoped that additional witnesses and a picture of a possible piece of brain tissue found in the rental car (which had been lost since the original investigation) would incriminate Carpenter. He was arrested and held for trial after a preliminary hearing before a Superior Court judge who ruled that evidence justified a trial by jury. During Carpenter's 1994 trial, defense attorneys attacked the prosecution's case as circumstantial and inconclusive. They denied that Carpenter and Crane were on bad terms; they further said the theory that a camera tripod was the murder weapon was sheer speculation based on Carpenter's occupation. They also disputed the claim that the rediscovered photo showed brain tissue, and they noted that authorities did not have any such tissue. The defense pointed out that Crane had been videotaped and photographed in compromising sexual positions with numerous women, implying that a jealous person or someone fearing blackmail might have been the killer. Carpenter was found not guilty. He maintained his innocence until his own death on September 4, 1998. Bob Crane's murder remains officially unsolved.
Tags: Bob  Crane  murder  unsolved 
Added: 30th April 2012
Views: 1743
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Posted By: Lava1964
Death of Salvador Sanchez - 1982 Boixing lost a terrific champion way too early in the summer of 1982. Salvador Sánchez of Mexico was well on his way to becoming the greatest featherwight boxer of all time. Sánchez was 44-1-1 in 46 career fights. He had upset popular Danny (Little Red ) Lopez in February 1980 to win the WBC version of the 126-pound title. He went on to defend it numerous times in the next 30 months. Sánchez was a skilled boxer/puncher who could wear down an opponent with accurate, sharp, stinging blows. He was, not surprisingly, a national hero in Mexico. Sadly Sánchez was killed in a sngle-car crash in Mexico on August 12, 1982. He was just 23 years old. At the time he was training for a rematch with the tough Juan Laporte. Sánchez had beaten Laporte in December 1980. Sánchez's last fight was a skillful 15-round knockout of Azumah Nelson in New York City's Madison Square Garden about three weeks before the fatal car accident. Sánchez crashed on the early morning while driving his Porsche 928 sports car along the Mexican federal highway from Santiago de Querétaro to San Luis Potosí, dying instantly. Sánchez was posthumously inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame in 1991.
Tags: boxing  Salvador  Sanchez 
Added: 14th May 2012
Views: 1733
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Posted By: Lava1964

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