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Shake Rattle and Roll-- Bill Haley and the Comets Bill Haley & His Comets cover version of the song, recorded on July 7, 1954 was just three weeks after Big Joe Turner's version first topped the R&B charts.
Tags: Shake  Rattle  and  Roll--  Bill  Haley  and  the  Comets  R&B  1954  Rock  and  Roll  Rhythm  and  Blues  Big  Joe  Turner 
Added: 21st October 2012
Views: 2342
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Posted By: Music Maiden
Shake Rattle and Roll-- Big Joe Turner Big JoeTurner's version was recorded in New York on February 15, 1954, three weeks before Bill Haley and the Comets.
Tags: Shake  Rattle  and  Roll--  Bill  Haley  and  the  Comets  R&B  1954  Rock  and  Roll  Rhythm  and  Blues  Big  Joe  Turner 
Added: 21st October 2012
Views: 1879
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Posted By: Music Maiden
Larry Hagman Talks of Dallas Cancer and Veganism Dallas star Larry Hagman received a frightening cancer diagnosis last year, just a few weeks shy of filming the re-launch of the popular series. In the time since, a lot has changed for the 81-year-old TV veteran.
Tags: Larry  Hagman  Talks  of  Dallas  Cancer  and  Veganism  I  Dream  of  Jeannie 
Added: 24th November 2012
Views: 669
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Posted By: Cathy
Short Life of Patrick Kennedy For two days in August 1963, the attention and concern of many Americans was focused on the newborn son of president John F. Kennedy, Patrick. Patrick Bouvier Kennedy was born by emergency caesarean section five-and-a-half weeks early at the Otis Air Force Base Hospital in Bourne, Massachusetts. His birth weight of 4 pounds 10-1/2 ounces medically classified him as premature. Immediately after Patrick's birth, he was transferred to Boston Children's Hospital where he died two days later of hyaline membrane disease, following treatment in a hyperbaric chamber. His obituary in The New York Times stated that, at that time, all that could be done for a victim of hyaline membrane disease "is to monitor the infant's blood chemistry and to try to keep it near normal levels." Hyaline membrane disease, now more commonly called respiratory distress syndrome, helped spark new public awareness of the disease and further research. In 2004, the disease had an overall mortality of less than 15%ólower among mildly to moderately premature infants, such as with the Kennedys' infant son. Had he been born 50 years later in August 2013, his odds of survival would have been 95%. Treatment modalities are now widely available in developed countries, such as continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), pulmonary surfactant replacement, and improved respirator technology, that either did not exist or were unavailable in 1963.
Tags: Kennedy  baby  death   
Added: 1st September 2013
Views: 415
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Posted By: Lava1964
Bobby Riggs on Tonight Show From a 1973 episode of The Tonight Show: Bobby Riggs gives Johnny Carson some tennis pointers two weeks before the former's match versus Billie Jean King. Carson loved tennis and was regularly seen at the sport's major events. He was apparently a decent weekend hacker too.
Tags: tennis  Bobby  Riggs  Johnny  Carson  Tonight  Show 
Added: 3rd September 2013
Views: 390
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Posted By: Lava1964
Chile vs Nobody - 1974 WC Qualifier In one of the strangest sporting scenes ever, on November 21, 1973 the Chilean soccer team took to the field at the National Stadium in Santiago in a crucial qualifying match for the 1974 World Cup tournament against no opposition! Their opponents were supposed to be the Soviet Union. Chile and the USSR were vying for the final berth for the 1974 World Cup tournament in West Germany. In the first game of a two-game playoff, the teams had played to a hard-fought 0-0 draw two months earlier in Moscow. However, a right-wing revolution toppled the elected Chilean government shortly thereafter. Hundreds of undesirable political leftists were executed at Santiago's National Stadium just two weeks before the scheduled return match. The horrified Soviets wanted the match to be played at a neutral site--or at the very least switched to a different venue within Chile. FIFA refused to move the game to another stadium, so the Soviets refused to play. At the appointed time, as this clip shows, the Chileans kicked off, made a few passes, and scored a goal into an unguarded net. Since there was no opposing team to take the subsequent kickoff, the referee forfeited the game to the Chileans. Chile was eliminated in the group stage of the 1974 World Cup.
Tags: soccer  World  Cup  Chile  USSR  qualifier 
Added: 16th October 2013
Views: 411
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Posted By: Lava1964
Joanie Loves Chachi Joanie Loves Chachi was a sitcom spun off from Happy Days in March 1982. Happy Days was already well in decline by that point, so ABC was somewhat desperate to milk any residual life from the romance of Joanie Cunningham and Chachi Arcola. The premise of this show was that Joanie and Chachi uproot from Milwaukee to form a rock band in Chicago. They move in with Chachi's mother, Louisa, who had recently married Al Delvecchio--the proprietor of Arnold's in Milwaukee! Joanie Loves Chachi ran for four weeks in the spring of 1982 as a "tryout sitcom" and finished in the top seven shows. (Critics point out it ran against very weak rerun opposition on the other networks.) However, when Joanie Loves Chachi returned as a full sitcom in ABC's fall lineup for 1982, it quickly dropped to a dismal 68th spot in the ratings. No further new shows were aired after December 1982, although reruns occasionally appeared on ABC until Spetember 1983. Of course, Joanie, Chachi and Al all curiously returned to Milwaukee and the cast of Happy Days to finish its final season. Here is the opening sequence of Joanie Loves Chachi--which ran for nearly two minutes!
Tags: Joanie  Loves  Chachi  ABC  sitcom  spinoff  Happy  Days 
Added: 1st February 2014
Views: 538
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Posted By: Lava1964
Collyer Brothers - Famous NYC Recluses On March 21, 1947, New York City police received an anonymous telephone call reporting a dead body at the Collyer home in what was once a fashionable section of Harlem. The brownstone house was shared by Homer and Langley Collyer, two brothers who gained a measure of celebrity for living like hermits in New York City. The sons of a physician, the Collyer brothers were once prominent and productive citizens. Homer, the older sibling, was an admiralty lawyer. Langley was a concert pianist. Both were Sunday school instructors. Upon the deaths of their parents, though, the brothers shut off themselves from the outside world. They stopped paying taxes and lived without utilities for nearly 30 years. Homer went blind due to hemorrhages and later became paralyzed. Langley became Homer's caregiver. He cooked food on a portable kerosene stove and carried water in buckets from a public park four blocks away. Langley also became a notorious pack rat and scrounger. Venturing out of his house only in the dead of night, he'd shop for whatever food he needed for the day and pick up discarded items of all sorts. He retained newspapers for years so that Homer could catch up on his reading once he regained his sight. He occasionally befriended newspaper reporters who wrote stories about the reclusive Collyer brothers. Langley often fed Homer 100 oranges per week in the hope it would help him regain his eyesight. Fearful of burglars, Langley turned the Collyer house into a maze of pathways and crawl spaces amid the numerous junk and refuse that collected in the house. He built booby-traps to ensnare potential intruders. Based on the anonymous phone tip in March 1947, police broke into the Collyer home and found Homer, clad in a tattered robe, dead in a chair from malnutrition. Nearly a month went by before Langley was found amid the 140 tons of items that had been piled haphazardly throughout the house. Langley's body was found by sanitation workers under a mountain of debris only about 10 feet from where Homer's body had been found. Police theorized that Langley had accidentally tripped one of his own booby-traps and died of suffocation. Helpless and with no one to care for him, Homer slowly died of starvation about two weeks later. Among the wide variety of items found in the Collyer house were 14 pianos, most of a Model T Ford, tons of newspapers, thousands of law books, sexy pin-up posters circa 1910, dressmakers' dummies, unopened mail, 34 passbooks for various bank accounts, and unused tickets to a church function from 1905.
Tags: Collyer  brothers  pack  rats  hermits  NYC 
Added: 7th October 2014
Views: 132
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Posted By: Lava1964
Eddie Grant Memorial Resurfaces Eddie Grant was a Harvard-educated ballplayer who played for four MLB teams between 1906 and 1915. After his baseball career ended, Grant enlisted in the army during the First World War at age 34. He rose to the rank of captain. On October 5, 1918, a few weeks before the war ended, Grant was killed by enemy shell fire in the Argonne Forest. On Memorial Day 1921, the New York Giants, Grant's final MLB team, unveiled an enormous brass plaque that was handsomely mounted on a five-foot granite marker that sat in the deepest part of the Polo Grounds underneath the home team's clubhouse. From the memorial's dedication until the Giants abandoned New York and the Polo Grounds in 1957, a solemn wreath-laying ceremony was held at the Grant monument every year, usually between games of a Memorial Day doubleheader. At the conclusion of the final game played at the Polo Grounds on September 29, 1957, souvenir hunters mobbed the field. The New York Times reported that three teenagers were seen prying the bronze plaque off the monument. Rumors that the police ultimately recovered the plaque were never verified, and its whereabouts remained a mystery for nearly 42 years. In late July 1999, the Eddie Grant Memorial plaque was discovered in the attic of a home in Ho-Ho-Kus Township, NJ. It had been formerly owned by Lena and Gaetano Bucca. The new home owners, Brian and Deborah Lamb, came across the plaque carefully wrapped in a blanket and hidden under a trap door in the attic. Brian Lamb contacted Baseball Reliquary Board member, Wendy Brougalman, a former business associate, with news of the discovery. How did the 100-pound plaque end up in a New Jersey attic? The Lambs purchased the home from the Bucca family after the death of Lena Bucca in 1998. Gaetano Bucca, a former New York City police officer, died in 1974. Gaetano, who retired from the force in January 1958 and subsequently moved with his family to New Jersey, served in the city's 32nd precinct, an area of jurisdiction encompassing the Polo Grounds. It is assumed that that Officer Bucca and a few allies had arranged to take the plaque with the intention of delivering it to the Eddie Grant American Legion Post 1225 in the Bronx. The plaque never made it there. Benjamin Bucca, Gaetano's only surviving son and a respected probate attorney, had no knowledge at all of the 100-pound plaque situated just above his head in his former bedroom. "You know, I never felt comfortable in that bedroom," he said. "Now I know why! That thing could have fallen on my head in the middle of the night and flattened me. My Pop was always a bit of a mystery, but this . . . This is . . . What the hell was he thinking about?'"
Tags: Baseball  Eddie  Grant  Memorial  recovered 
Added: 8th October 2014
Views: 209
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Posted By: Lava1964

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