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Fatty Arbuckle Scandal 1921 One of the most tragic figures in movie history was Roscoe (Fatty) Arbuckle. A onetime cabaret singer, Arbuckle was among the most popular actors in silent comedies from 1914 to 1921. Starting as an extra at Keystone Studios, the surprisingly nimble Arbuckle quickly graduated to starring roles in the studio's slapstick comedy films where he was noted for his terrific accuracy in throwing pies and other missiles. Later, like Charlie Chaplin, Arbuckle matured as a performer, adding brilliantly subtle aspects to his comedy routines. A box-office favorite, he was making a seven-figure salary at Paramount Pictures in 1921. Midway through that year Arbuckle was so popular that he was put to work on three feature comedy films simultaneously! Shortly after completing them, Arbuckle's career abruptly ended in scandal. He was accused of sexually assaulting small-time actress Virginia Rappe at a party he was hosting in a suite at the St. Francis Hotel in San Francisco on Labor Day 1921. Rappe died four days later in a maternity hosptal of peritonitis from a ruptured bladder, presumably caused by the 266-pound Arbuckle forcing himself on her. (There was also an apocryphal story of Rappe being raped with a champagne or cola bottle. How this slanderous story started is anyone's guess.) Rappe had become violently ill and irrational at the party. Arbuckle and several partygoers tried to succor Rappe and eventually moved her to another hotel room where she was examined by three different doctors over the next three days. A postmortem on Rappe's body found no signs of sexual assault whatsoever. In all likelihood Rappe death's was due to medical negligence or malpractice. Moreover, Rappe was hardly the virginal victim that the popular press and D.A.'s office portrayed her to be. The mistress of director Henry Lehrman, Rappe had had at least four abortions by the time she was 16, she had an out-of-wedlock child that she had abandoned, and she was afflicted with gonorrhea. In the summer of 1921 the 26-year-old Rappe, who hadn't had an acting job in two years, recently underwent another illegal abortion. Rappe was also suffering from a chronic illness that was exacerbated by her taste for poor-quality Prohibition booze. The accusations against Arbuckle were based solely on a malicious complaint fabricated by party attendee Maude Delmont, a known extortionist who claimed to be a "lifelong friend" of Rappe's--but had only known Rappe for two days prior to the Labor Day party. Arbuckle was astounded when a horde of reporters descended upon his Hollywood mansion to tell him he was being investigated for rape and possible murder charges in Rappe's death. Beginning in late September, Arbuckle was tried three times for rape and manslaughter in the space of seven months. He spent $700,000 on legal fees to beat the bogus charges. The prosecution's case was absurdly weak and should have been dropped. In fact, complainant Delmont was never called as a witness because her wild story of Arbuckle assaulting Rappe for an hour did not jibe with the physical evidence nor the timeline of events at the party. Nevertheless, the San Francisco D.A.'s office doggedly pursued the charges against Arbuckle because of intense pressure by reformers and moralists. The first two trials resulted in hung juries. At the first trial, Arbuckle fared terrifically when he eagerly took the stand to defend himself. It ended with the jury voting 10-2 in favor of acquittal. One stubborn holdout was a militant feminist so determined to convict Arbuckle that she refused to read any portions of the trial's transcript or listen to other jurors' opinions--to the point of childishly putting her hands over her ears! The second trial, in which Arbuckle's legal team badly advised him not to bother to take the stand because his innocence was obvious, was surprisingly 9-3 in favor of conviction! At the third trial, in April 1922, Arbuckle wisely took the stand. The jury deliberated for a mere six minutes before returning with a not guilty verdict that was loudly cheered by the gallery. Furthermore, the jury also insisted a formal apology to Arbuckle be read into the trials' official transcript. Film historians generally believe Arbuckle was totally innocent of any wrongdoing and was the victim of malicious prosecution. Nevertheless, his acting career abruptly ended because newly appointed Hollywood censorship czar Will Hays banned distributors from showing any Arbuckle comedies despite being acquitted! Although filmdom was deprived of a master comic's work, Arbuckle stayed in movies by directing films under an assumed name. He was just beginning to make an acting comeback--with six two-reel comedie--when died of heart failure in 1933 at age 46. According to Arbuckle biographer David A. Yallop, in an era when Hollywood stars routinely engaged in all sorts of debauchery, Roscoe, ironically, "was probably the most chaste man in Hollywood."
Tags: Roscoe  Fatty  Arbuckle  scandal  1921 
Added: 16th November 2007
Views: 2858
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Posted By: Lava1964
DAY OF INFAMY SPEECH IN RESPONSE TO THE JAPANESE ATTACK ON PEARL HARBOR 12 07 41 This address, by President Franklin D Roosevelt, given on December 8, 1941, is regarded as one of the most famous American political speeches of the twentieth century. Roosevelt's speech had an immediate and long-lasting impact on American politics. Thirty-three minutes after he finished speaking, Congress declared war on Japan, with only one Representative, Jeannette Rankin, voting against the declaration. The speech was broadcast live by radio and attracted the largest audience in US radio history, with over 81 percent of American homes tuning in to hear the president. The response was overwhelmingly positive, both within Congress and the nation.
Tags: day  of  infamy  speech  president  franklin  d  roosevelt  attack  on  pearl  harbor  december  7  1941 
Added: 6th December 2007
Views: 3619
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Posted By: Guido
If The 60s Had Twitter Tags: If  The  60s  Had  Twitter  Hippies  draft  dodgers  voting   
Added: 6th June 2009
Views: 2591
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Posted By: Cliffy
Rona Barrett  Interviews - Donna Reed After devoting more than 30 years of her life to bring the public accurate information about all aspects of the entertainment industry, Rona is now devoting her time and efforts to help the elderly poor.
Tags: Rona  Barrett  Remembers  *  Donna  Reed 
Added: 4th December 2009
Views: 2142
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Posted By: pfc
1957 MLB All-Star Voting Scandal The 1957 Major League Baseball All-Star Game took place on July 9 of that year in St. Louis. Fans determined which players qualified for the game by sending in their votes to the Commissioner's office. However, a major stink arose when seven Cincinnati Reds garnered the most votes. (First baseman Stan Musial of the St. Louis Cardinals was the only non-Red to win his position's voting in the National League.) The Reds who finished atop the polls were Ed Bailey, Johnny Temple, Roy McMillan, Don Hoak, Frank Robinson, Gus Bell and Wally Post. The Reds were a good team, but they hardly deserved to dominate the NL All-Star balloting. (They would finish fourth in the eight-team NL in 1957.) An investigation showed that more than half the ballots cast came from Cincinnati. The Cincinnati Enquirer had printed up pre-marked ballots and distributed them with the Sunday newspaper to make it easy for Reds fans to vote often. There were even stories of bars in Cincinnati refusing to serve customers until they filled out ballots. Commissioner Ford Frick partially nullified the election results by appointing Willie Mays of the New York Giants and Hank Aaron of the Milwaukee Braves in place of Gus Bell and Wally Post. In addition, Frick decided to strip the fans of their voting rights. Beginning in 1958, managers, players, and coaches picked the entire team until 1970, when the vote again returned to the fans. The American League won the 1957 MLB All-Star Game 6-5.
Tags: baseball  Cincinnati  Reds  All-Star  Game  election  scandal   
Added: 9th January 2011
Views: 3757
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Posted By: Lava1964
The Importance of Correct Spelling During the 2010 Illinois gubernatorial election, Green Party candidate Rich Whitney was the unfortunate victim of a spelling error on the electronic voting machines used at the advance polls. Whitney's surname somehow was misspelled without the 'n'--thus his name appeared on the screen as 'Rich Whitey.' Moreover, of the 23 advanced polling stations, 12 were in predominantly black areas. The 55-year-old Whitney was predictably miffed by the gaffe. Election officials apologized for the spelling error--which was noticed too late to be corrected--but stressed that 90 percent of Illinois voters typically cast paper ballots on election day--where Green's name was spelled correctly. Green finished a poor fourth in the election. He garnered less than three percent of the vote.
Tags: Rich  Whitney  election  Illinois  spelling  error 
Added: 17th January 2011
Views: 1229
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Posted By: Lava1964
Stockwell Day-Doris Day Petition One of Canada's most popular homegrown TV shows is a CBC comedy program called This Hour Has 22 Minutes. One of the show's most fondly remembered moments was the "Stockwell Day Petition." The sketch aired during the 2000 Canadian federal election campaign, and consisted of a staged rant by host Rick Mercer. During that particular federal election, Stockwell Day, who was then the leader of the Canadian Alliance Party, proposed a mechanism to call for a referendum. Day proposed that a petition on ANY subject which gathered at least 350,000 signatures from voting-age citizens (about 3% of Canada's eligible voters) would automatically trigger a national referendum. Mercer decided to put Day's poorly thought out idea to the test: His "rant" asked viewers to log on to the show's website and sign an online petition demanding the Alliance Party leader change his first name to Doris--thus making him Doris Day. The show's producers claimed to have obtained in excess of 1.2 million online signatures--although there was no way of telling how many of those who signed the online petition were actually eligible voters. The stunt got huge publicity in Canada and even made some international news programs. The petition had no effect on Alliance Party policy, though, despite clearly demonstrating how absurd Day's proposal was. Day did, however, take the petition in stride. When asked about it by a reporter, Day gave a very appropriate response: "Que será, será!"
Tags: Canada  CBC  Stockwell  Day  petition 
Added: 20th June 2012
Views: 3090
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Posted By: Lava1964
Mike Marshall SI Cover Mike Marshall of the Los Angeles Dodgers (shown here on an SI cover) was the National League's Cy Young Award winner in 1974. He finished third in league MVP voting as well. A screwball pitcher, the indefatigable Marshall appeared in 106 games in 1974. Thirteen of those appearances were in consecutive games. Both marks are modern MLB records. Marshall was a bit of an eccentric for his day. He was a student of kinesiology and nearly quit baseball after 1974 to pursue his PhD. He believes that proper mechanics can totally eliminate pitchers' arm injuries. He was also dead set against signing autographs--especially for kids. Why the reluctance to sign? Marshall believed professional baseball players should not be revered as heroic figures by children. (The Cincinnati Reds, the "establishment team" of the 1970s, loathed Marshall because of his no-autograph policy--and because he made the difference in the Dodgers winnng the 1974 NL West title instead of the Reds.) The scarcity of Marshall's autograph makes it valuable and desirable to collectors. More often than not, the rare specimens of it are written as "Dr. Mike Marshall."
Tags: baseball  Mike  Marshall  SI  cover 
Added: 25th June 2012
Views: 1304
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Posted By: Lava1964
Suffragette Poster At one time the three groups of adults who were legally excluded from voting in many western democracies were convicts, lunatics, and women--as this suffragette poster pointed out.
Tags: suffragette  poster  votes 
Added: 17th March 2013
Views: 1676
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Posted By: Lava1964
Celebrity Sweepstakes - Game Show Celebrity Sweepstakes was an NBC game show that aired from April 1, 1974 to October 1, 1976. It was hosted by Jim MacKrell. Here's how it worked: A panel of six celebrities was asked a trivia question. Before knowing the exact question but only the category, the members of the studio audience, through an electronic voting system, determined the odds of each panelist answering the question correctly by selecting whom they thought was most likely to give the correct answer. Based on those odds, the contestants wagered money on a celebrity and then found out if the bet was a good one. Celebrity Sweepstakes was originally slotted against Search for Tomorrow where it did not fare well against the popular CBS soap opera. It was then moved to 10 a.m. where it routinely bettered The Joker's Wild in the ratings. However, when CBS expanded The Price is Right to an hour, Celebrity Sweepstakes was blown away. For years it was believed all Celebrity Sweepstakes episodes had been erased by NBC, but obviously this one survived. This is the final eight minutes of the final show from October 1, 1976.
Tags: NBC  game  show  Celebrity  Sweepstakes 
Added: 3rd April 2013
Views: 1519
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Posted By: Lava1964

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