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Get Smart TV Guide Cover 1967 Barbara Feldon and Don Adams of Get Smart grace this TV Guide cover from 1967. Get Smart was an extremely popular spy spoof that ran on NBC from 1965 to 1970 that pitted the counter-espionage activities of CONTROL versus the nefarious deeds of KAOS. The show introduced the phrase "would you believe..." into popular culture. The youthful looking Adams was ten years Feldon's senior. Adams won three consecutive Emmys playing Maxwell Smart (CONTROL agent 86). Feldon was nominated for two Emmys for her role as CONTROL agent 99. Adams was a WWII veteran who was the only survivor from a platoon that saw action on Guadalcanal. Feldon first gained fame by winning the jackpot on The $64,000 Question. Her subject was Shakespeare.
Tags: Get  Smart  Don  Adams  Barbara  Feldon 
Added: 22nd November 2011
Views: 1854
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Posted By: Lava1964
Maudie Hopkins - Last Civil War Widow Maudie Hopkins (December 7, 1914 August 17, 2008) was an American woman believed to be the last known surviving widow of a Civil War veteran. Born Maudie Cecilia Acklin in Baxter County, Arkansas, she married William M. Cantrell (aged 86) on February 2, 1934, when she was 19. Cantrell had enlisted in the Confederate States Army at age 16 in Pikeville, Kentucky, and served in General Samuel G. French's Battalion of the Virginia Infantry. He was captured in 1863 and was later part of a prisoner exchange. He had had a previous wife, who died in 1929. Cantrell supported Maudie with a Confederate pension of $25 every two or three months. She inherited his home upon his death in 1937 but received no further pension benefits. She remarried later in 1937, and twice thereafter, and had three children. It was not especially uncommon for young women in Arkansas to marry Confederate pensioners for purely financial reasons. In fact, it became something akin to a career choice. To curtail these sham marriages, in 1937 the state passed a law stating that women who married Civil War veterans would not be eligible for widows' pensions. (The law was later amended in 1939 to state that only widows born after 1870 were ineligible for pensions.) Hopkins generally kept her first marriage a secret, fearing the resulting gossip from marrying a much older man would damage her reputation. After researching records from Arkansas and United States Census Bureau data, Hopkins was certified as the last Civil War widow by various historical organizations, most notably the United Daughters of the Confederacy. A spokeswoman for the UDC, Martha Boltz, said at the time that there may be two other unverified widows, one in Tennessee and another in North Carolina, but if they were still alive, they had chosen to remain in anonymity. Hopkins, show here in a photo from 2004, died on August 17, 2008 in a nursing home in Lexa, Arkansas, aged 93.
Tags: widow  Civil  War  Maudie  Hopkins 
Added: 23rd November 2011
Views: 3153
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Posted By: Lava1964
Last Female WWI veteran dies Florence Patterson Green never saw the front line. Her war was spent serving food, not dodging bullets. But Green, who died on February 4, 2012, aged 110, was the last known surviving veteran of World War I. She was serving with the Women's Royal Air Force as a waitress at an air base in eastern England when the guns fell silent on November 11, 1918. It was not until 2010 that she was officially recognized as a veteran after a researcher found her service record in Britain's National Archives. Green died Saturday at the Briar House Care Home in King's Lynn, eastern England, two weeks before her 111th birthday, the home said. Retired Air Vice-Marshal Peter Dye, director-general of the RAF Museum, said it was fitting that the last survivor of the first global war was someone who had served on the home front. "In a way, that the last veteran should be a lady and someone who served on the home front is something that reminds me that warfare is not confined to the trenches," Dye said. "It reminds us of the Great War, and all warfare since then has been something that involved everyone. It's a collective experience ... Sadly, whether you are in New York, in London, or in Kandahar, warfare touches all of our lives." She was born Florence Beatrice Patterson in London on February 19, 1901, and joined the newly formed Women's Royal Air Force in September 1918 at the age of 17. The service trained women to work as mechanics, drivers and in other jobs to free men for front-line duty. Green went to work as a steward in the officers' mess, first at the Narborough airdrome and then at RAF Marham in eastern England, and was serving there when the war ended. The photo below was taken in February 2010 at a celebration of Florence's 109th birthday.
Tags: Florence  Patterson  Green  WWI  veteran 
Added: 8th February 2012
Views: 1259
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Posted By: Lava1964
Death Wish Movies Death Wish was a 1974 movie loosely based on a 1972 novel by Brian Garfield. The plot focuses on the relentless vigilantism of a seemingly mild-mannered architecht Paul Kersey (Charles Bronson), a Korean War veteran. Kersey methodically pursues the band of criminals who raped and killed his wife during a home invasion. (Kersey's married daughter is also raped and suffers permanent psychological damage.) The film was notweorthy for its disturbing realism in the home-invasion scene and the ruthlessness in which Kersey stalks and mercilessly kills the culprits. The film received mixed to extremely negative reviews upon its release due to its support of vigilantism, but it had an impact on U.S. audiences. People were known to loudly cheer widely during the revenge-killing scenes. The movie did especially well at the box office in violence-plagued urban areas. Four sequels were made in the next two decades. Not surprisingly, the Death Wish films caused widespread debate over how to deal with rampant urban crime. Many critics were displeased with the film. One declared it to be an "immoral threat to society" and an encouragement of antisocial behavior. Vincent Canby of the New York Times was one of the most outspoken writers, condemning Death Wish in two extensive articles. Author Brian Garfield was also unhappy with the how the film varied greatly from his book. He called the film 'incendiary', and stated that each of the following sequels are all pointless and rancid, since they all advocate vigilantism unlike his two novels which are the exact opposite. Bronson defended the film: He felt it was intended to be a commentary on violence and was meant to attack violence, not romanticize it. Over time many critics began to warm to the original film more than the four sequels, which were more exploitative and contrived.
Tags: Death  Wish  movies  Charles  Bronson  vigilantism   
Added: 16th May 2012
Views: 1210
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Posted By: Lava1964
Thank You To Those That Served Tags: Memorial  Day  Veterans  Navy  Air  Force  Marines  Army  Coast  Guard 
Added: 27th May 2012
Views: 1320
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Posted By: Steve
A Veteran Remembers Tags: Veteran,  Memorial  Day,  remembering,  World  War  II,  Korean  War 
Added: 28th May 2012
Views: 1667
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Posted By: pfc
AfterMASH TV networks can't leave well enough alone. In February 1983, MASH exited the airwaves in a blaze of glory after 11 successful and brilliant seasons of quality television. Seven months later, CBS reunited a few of its characters in a sequel titled AfterMASH. (The title was intended to be a pun on "aftermath".) The show was set immediately following the end of the Korean War and chronicled the adventures of three characters from the original series: Colonel Potter (played by Harry Morgan), Klinger (Jamie Farr) and Father Mulcahy (William Christopher). By several quirks of fate, all three end up working at a veterans' hospital in Missouri. Rosalind Chao rounded out the starring cast as Soon-Lee Klinger, a Korean refugee whom Klinger met in the last two episodes of MASH and married at the end of the series. AfterMASH premiered on September 26, 1983 in the same Monday night 9:00 p.m. EST. time slot that MASH once had. Curious and faithful MASH fans provided vast audience numbers for that first broadcast. AfterMASH debuted at #1 in the weekly TV ratings--the first time a new show had done that since Laverne and Shirley. It finished 10th out of all network shows for the 1983-1984 season according to Nielsen Media Research television ratings. For its second season CBS disastrously moved the show to Tuesday nights at 8:00 p.m. EST., opposite NBC's top-ten hit The A-Team. CBS launched an optimistic marketing campaign featuring illustrations by Sanford Kossin of Max Klinger in a nurse's uniform, shaving off Mr. T's signature mohawk, theorizing AfterMASH would take a large portion of The A-Team's audience. The exact opposite occurred: AfterMASH's ratings plummeted to near the bottom of the television rankings and the show was canceled just nine episodes into its second season. Twenty-nine AfterMASH episodes had aired, one was shown as late as May 1985. A thirtieth episode was completed but was never broadcast. Comparisons to the original MASH were inevitable and largely unfavorable. In 2002, TV Guide listed AfterMASH, perhaps uncharitably, as the seventh-worst TV series ever.
Tags: TV  AfterMASH  sequel 
Added: 19th June 2012
Views: 1971
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Posted By: Lava1964
Jim Joyce Blown Call Incident It was one of the strangest feel-good stories in sports history: On Wednesday, June 2, 2010, Detroit Tigers' pitcher Armando Galarraga was one out from pitching a rare perfect game. Cleveland Indians' batter Jason Donald hit a ground ball to the right side of the infield. First baseman Miguel Cabrera moved toward second base to field the ball. Galarraga ran from the pitcher's mound to cover first base. Cabrera's throw to Galarraga beat Donald to the bag by about three-quarters of a step--but Jim Joyce, a highly regarded 22-year MLB veteran umpire, incorrectly ruled Donald safe. Galarraga retired the next Indians' hitter for a 3-0 shutout win, but Joyce came under immediate fire for missing the call that cost Galarraga a perfect game. Death threats were sent to his family members in Oregon. MLB Security provided extra protection to Joyce and his umpiring crew. However, Joyce did a remarkable thing: he publicly and candidly acknowledged his error and tearfully apologized to Galarraga in the umpires' room. Galarraga handled the situation incredibly well, telling Joyce that "we're all human." The next afternoon, Joyce was working home plate. Tigers' manager Jim Leyland sent Galarraga to the plate to present the lineup card to a teary-eyed Joyce (see photo). The crowd loudly cheered both Joyce and Galarraga. The dynamics of the situation completely changed: Joyce was then widely hailed as a hero for owning up to his mistake. He received hundreds of letters and emails of support from people from all walks of life. When Joyce's umpiring crew arrived in Philadelphia for their next series, they were applauded at the airport.
Tags: umpire  baseball  Jim  Joyce  mistake 
Added: 8th October 2012
Views: 1227
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Posted By: Lava1964
George Davis - Vanishing Baseball Superstar George Stacey Davis was one of the finest shortstops in Major League Baseball history. He enjoyed a 20-year MLB career from 1890 through 1909. Blessed with a strong arm and an excellent batting eye, Davis was a perennial star for the New York Giants during the late 19th and early 20th century. A switch-hitter, Davis compiled 2,688 career hits and 615 stolen bases. He still holds the Giants' club record for the longest hitting streak (36 games). So valuable was Davis to the Giants that he became one of the controversial figures in the war between the National and American Leagues when he jumped to the Chicago White Stockings of the AL in 1902. Once Davis' playing career ended, he coached Amherst College's baseball team, managed a bowling alley, and sold automobiles for a time. Then he vanished. For decades many noteworthy baseball historians rated Davis as the best player not in the Hall of Fame--and no one seemed to know what had happened to him. In 1968, Lee Allen, the historian at the National Baseball Hall of Fame, wrote an article for The Sporting News in which he asked for any information about Davis' later years and death. A woman claiming to be Davis' niece replied. She put Allen in touch with Davis' estranged sister who suggested Allen should check the records of state hospitals in Pennsylvania. Allen eventually found Davis' death certificate. He had died in a Philadelphia mental institution in 1940 at the age of 70. He had lived there for six years, suffering from the effects of syphilis. Records showed his wife paid $41 to have him quickly interred in a pauper's grave. In 1998 Davis was posthumously inducted into the Hall of Fame by the Veterans' Committee. For the only time in the Hall of Fame's history, no living relative could be found to accept a deceased inductee's plaque at the induction ceremony, although 50 fans from Davis' hometown of Cohoes, NY were present. The purchase of a handsome headstone for Davis' previously unmarked grave was financed by the Society for American Baseball Research shortly after Davis was enshrined in Cooperstown.
Tags: baseball  George  Davis  vanished  syphilis  Hall  of  Fame 
Added: 31st December 2015
Views: 980
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Posted By: Lava1964
Larry Hagman Talks of Dallas Cancer and Veganism Dallas star Larry Hagman received a frightening cancer diagnosis last year, just a few weeks shy of filming the re-launch of the popular series. In the time since, a lot has changed for the 81-year-old TV veteran.
Tags: Larry  Hagman  Talks  of  Dallas  Cancer  and  Veganism  I  Dream  of  Jeannie 
Added: 24th November 2012
Views: 1371
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Posted By: Cathy

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