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And This Can Be Yours For 2100.00 This 1954 SUPERMAN lunch pail by Universal didn't even come with a thermos!!
Tags: lunch  pail  superman  universal 
Added: 6th July 2007
Views: 2476
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Posted By: Teresa
1931 Bela Lugosi Movie Poster Lugosi, the youngest of four children, was born Béla Ferenc Dezső Blaskó' in Lugos, Hungary on October 20, 1882. On arrival in America, the 6-feet-1 inch, 180 lb. Lugosi worked for some time as a laborer, then returned to the theater within the Hungarian-American community. He was approached to star in a play adapted by Hamilton Deane and John L. Balderston from Bram Stoker's novel Dracula. The Horace Liveright production was successful. Despite his excellent notices in the title role, and appearances in some American silent films, Lugosi had to campaign vigorously for the chance to repeat his stage success in Tod Browning's movie version of Dracula (1931), produced by Universal Pictures.
Tags: dracula  bela  lugosi  tod  browning 
Added: 29th August 2007
Views: 2034
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Posted By: Teresa
Universal Soldier Lyrics, Lyrics, Lyrics.
Tags: Donovan  Universal  Soldier 
Added: 11th February 2008
Views: 1584
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Posted By: donmac101
My Wild Irish Rose for all my Irish Friends Mario Lanza (31 January 1921 to 7 October 1959) was an American tenor and Hollywood film star who enjoyed success in the late 1940s and 1950s. His voice was considered by many to rival that of Enrico Caruso, whom Lanza portrayed in the 1951 film "The Great Caruso." Lanza was able to sing all types of music. While his highly emotional style was not always universally praised by critics, he was immensely popular and his many recordings are still prized today.
Tags: my  wild  irish  rose  mario  lanza 
Added: 17th March 2008
Views: 1921
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Posted By: Naomi
Suzan Ball - - -  Lucys Cousin Sultry Suzan Ball, a distant cousin of Lucille Ball, was a starlet in the early 1950s under contract to Universal. While filming East of Sumatra (1953; with Jeff Chandler), Ball injured her right leg, which was later found to be cancerous. Her leg was eventually amputated below the knee. By 1955, the cancer had spread to her lungs, and she passed away in August 1955 at the age of 22. Ball married actor Richard Long in 1954, leaving him a widower just a year later.
Tags: Suzan  Ball  Lucille  Ball  East  of  Sumatra  Jeff  Chandler  Richard  Long   
Added: 22nd April 2008
Views: 2180
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Posted By: Old Fart
Brady Bunch Hour The Brady Bunch Hour, a 1977 ABC variety program, lasted just six episodes before being yanked. It has been universally panned as one of the worst television shows ever. Here is five-and-a-half minutes of an episode that had Milton Berle, Tina Turner, and Rip Taylor as guest stars--and let's not forget Fake Jan! The quality of this clip isn't especially good, but you just have to watch it to believe it.
Tags: Brady  Bunch  Hour 
Added: 15th July 2008
Views: 1310
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Posted By: Lava1964
Cardiff Giant Hoax 1869 The first great hoax in American history was the Cardiff Giant. In 1868, a wealthy American tobacconist and atheist named George Hull got into an argument with a minister about a passage in the book of Genesis that claimed that giant men once walked the earth. Inspired, Hull decided to create a fake petrified giant and foist it on the gullible public. He hired men in Fort Dodge, Iowa to carve him a 10-foot long block of gypsum. (Hull told them it was for a monument to Abraham Lincoln.) Hull sent the gypsum block to a stonecutter in Chicago to have it secretly carved into the likeness of a man. Once the work was completed, Hull had the carving sent to his cousin's farm in Cardiff, New York. There Hull artificially aged his giant with acid and buried it in the ground for 11 months. On October 16, 1869, two men hired to dig a well 'found' the giant. (This photo shows it being 'exhumed' from Hull's hiding place.) The story of the giant's discovery spread like wildfire. Hull initially charged the curious public 25 cents apiece to view the giant. He later upped the price to 50 cents. Despite scientists universally claiming the Cardiff Giant to be a hoax, Hull sold it for $37,500 to a five-man syndicate headed by David Hannon and laughed all the way to the bank. (The hoax had cost Hull about $2,600, so the sale netted him more than 14 times what he had spent!) P.T. Barnum tried to buy or rent the giant from Hannon for $60,000, but his offer was refused. Not to be outdone, Barnum had his own giant made, displayed it at his museum, and declared Hannon's giant was a fake! On December 10, Hull publicly confessed to his hoax. Meanwhile Hannon and Barnum were busily suing and countersuing each other over who possessed the real Cardiff Giant. Only in America...
Tags: Cardiff  Giant  hoax 
Added: 10th July 2008
Views: 13635
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Posted By: Lava1964
Kilroy Was Here During the Second World War, the odd phrase "Kilroy Was Here" began appearing on American military ships. Alongside the phrase was often a cartoon figure of a man with a huge nose peering over a wall. It was not until the war ended that the origin of the quirky character was known. James Kilroy was an inspector at a shipbuilding company in Halifax, MA. His job was to count the rivets used in each piece of work and make a checkmark with a wax pencil near the finished rivets. The riveters were paid for each rivet, so often unscrupulous ones would erase Kilroy's checkmarks in the hope that their work would be counted twice. To thwart this type of underhandedness, Kilroy began using the cartoon figure with the three-word phrase instead of a checkmark. No riveter ever tried to remove the artwork. Kilroy was supposed to remove it before the ships left the shipyard, but often he did not get the chance to do so. Thus, ships bearing the strange phrase and artwork headed into service. "Kilroy Was Here" became a catchphrase that was universally adopted throughout every American theater of war. It became fashionable to write it in strange places as an indication that the US military was omnipresent. It was often left behind by espionage agents and advance parties prior to mass invasions. According to one story, it was written inside the latrine used by Stalin, Roosevelt and Churchill during the historic Yalta Conference in 1945. The phrase has endured for more than 70 years. It was written on the wall of the compound where Osama Bin Laden was hiding out.
Tags: Kilroy  Was  Here  WWII 
Added: 7th December 2014
Views: 1898
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Posted By: Lava1964
The Conqueror 1956 There are not many bad John Wayne movies--but The Conqueror (1956) qualifies as a turkey. In it Wayne plays Temujin, a Genghis Khan-type character whose armies run amuck. He captures a Tartar woman (played by Susan Hayward) who is considered spoils of war. Says Temujin: 'I feel this Tartar woman is for me, and my blood says, take her. There are moments for wisdom and moments when I listen to my blood; my blood says, take this Tartar woman.' Of course a romance blossoms. The movie was universally panned by critics and is seldom seen on television. The Conqueror was filmed near an atomic testing site in Utah. Five notable cast members (Wayne, Hayward, Agnes Moorehead, Thomas Gomez, and Pedro Armendariz) all died of cancer.
Tags: John  Wayne  the  Conqueror 
Added: 25th October 2009
Views: 1603
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Posted By: Lava1964
Roger Patterson Bigfoot Film 1967 On October 20, 1967, Roger Patterson and Robert Gimlin allegedly filmed this 'bigfoot' in Bluff Creek, CA. This is frame #352 which gives the best view of the creature. Some say this film is ironclad proof that bigfoot is real. Others say it's proof that it's a hoax. Prior to 1958, few people had ever heard of the large creature that supposedly inhabits the remote wilderness of the Pacific northwest. People who claim they've encountered bigfoot describe the creature as anywhere from six to 10 feet tall, weighing about 500 pounds, and having an unpleasant odor. The scientific community almost universally believes bigfoot exists only in folklore. This view is unlikely to change until a live bogfoot or a corpse is found and thoroughly examined.
Tags: bigfoot  film  Patterson 
Added: 2nd November 2009
Views: 1968
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Posted By: Lava1964

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