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Gasoline Alley Get your Sunday paper and read the 'funnies' and take your family out to get pancakes!
Tags: comics  gasoline  alley  walt  wwallet  doc  avery  bill  the  rectangle  chicago  tribune  frank  king   
Added: 3rd July 2007
Views: 2576
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Posted By: lambchop
Dewey Defeats Truman The infamous headline in the Chicago Daily Tribune that prematurely declared Thomas Dewey the winner of the 1948 U.S. presidential election based on early projections. Harry Truman got a kick out of it.
Tags: Dewey  Defeats  Truman  headline 
Added: 11th February 2008
Views: 1203
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Posted By: Lava1964
Notre Dame Four Horsemen 1924 Notre Dame defeated Army 13-7 in a college football game on October 18, 1924. Grantland Rice of the New York Herald-Tribune began his eloquent report this way: 'Outlined against a blue-grey October sky, the Four Horsemen rode again. In dramatic lore they are known as famine, pestilence, destruction and death. These are only aliases. Their real names are Stuhldreher, Miller, Crowley and Layden. They formed the crest of the South Bend cyclone before which another fighting Army team was swept over the precipice at the Polo Grounds this afternoon as 55,000 spectators peered down upon the bewildering panorama spread out upon the green plain below.' Rice's article was terrific, but what really made Notre Dame's Four Horsemen famous was this photograph. Once the victorious Irish arrived back on campus, team publicity man George Strickler posed Harry Stuhldreher, Don Miller, Jim Crowley, and Elmer Layden atop horses borrowed from a local livery stable. The photograph was widely circulated and Notre Dame's 1924 backfield became legendary.
Tags: Notre  Dame  Four  Horsemen 
Added: 16th June 2008
Views: 1779
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Posted By: Lava1964
1933 Adolf Hitler Baby Photo Hoax In 1933, this supposed baby picture of Adolf Hitler circulated in newspapers in England and the United States. When it appeared in the Chicago Tribune in October 1933, the German consulate in that city denounced the photo as a hoax and provided a real baby photo of Hitler (which I posted on this website a little while ago). The hoax photo came from the London Bureau of Acme Newsphotos and originated from an unknown source in Austria. In 1938, Mrs. Harriet Downs of Lakewood, Ohio saw the photo in a magazine and recognized it as a doctored version of a photo of her two-year-old son, John May Warren, taken in 1932! The photo had been deliberately altered to make the child look sinister. How a baby photo from Ohio ended up in the hands of a hoaxer in Austria has never been discovered. Tragically, the boy in this photo died a few months later, at the age of eight, in a bicycle mishap.
Tags: Adolf  Hitler  baby  photo  hoax 
Added: 10th July 2008
Views: 3287
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Posted By: Lava1964
First MLB All-Star Game 1933 The first MLB All-Star Game was played n 1933. Arch Ward, the Chicago Tribune's sports editor, came up with the idea for the game. It was to coincide with the celebration of the city’s 'Century of Progress' Exposition. By the 1930s, baseball had already established itself as America’s favorite pastime and the national exposition provided the perfect stage to introduce baseball’s best to the rest of the country. The game was originally conceived as a single, one-time event to help lift the spirits of the country during the Great Depression. However, its enormous popularity made the All-Star Game an annual event. That first All-Star Game was played on July 6, 1933 at Comiskey Park in Chicago on a day when both leagues had no games scheduled. Retired Giants' manager John McGraw was chosen to manage the National League team, while Philadelphia Athletics' manager Connie Mack led the American League team. More than 47,000 fans attended. There was one player in particular who excited fans and players alike. 'We wanted to see the Babe,' said NL starting pitcher Bill Hallahan. 'Sure, he was old and had a big waistline, but that didn’t make any difference. We were on the same field as Babe Ruth.' (The National League team is shown in the photo below.) The first run was scored in the second inning, when AL starting pitcher Lefty Gomez drove in Jimmie Dykes with a single. In the next inning, Ruth gave the fans what they came to see--a two-run homer into the right-field stands. The crowd 'roared in acclamation' for the homer, according to Baseball Almanac. The AL went on the win the game 4-2, bolstered by Ruth’s home run, Jimmy Dykes' two hits, and seven innings of two-run pitching by Lefty Gomez, who got credit for the win. The National League was led by the 'Fordham Flash,' Frankie Frisch of the St. Louis Cardinals, who had two hits (including a home run) and two hits by Bill Terry, the first baseman of the New York Giants.
Tags: baseball  all-star  game 
Added: 11th July 2010
Views: 1161
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Posted By: Lava1964
NFL Champs Vs. College All-Stars 1934-1976 The Chicago Charities College All-Star Game was a preseason football tilt played annually (except 1974) from 1934 to 1976 between the National Football League champions and a team of star college seniors from the previous year. (There was one exception: The 1935 game involved the 1934 runner-up Chicago Bears instead of the champion New York Giants.) The game originally was a benefit for Chicago-area charities. Except for the 1943 and 1944 games which were held at Northwestern University, the game was always played at Soldier Field in Chicago. The first game, played before a crowd of 79,432 on August 31, 1934, was a scoreless tie between the all-stars and the Chicago Bears. The following year, a game that included future president Gerald Ford, the Bears won, 5-0. The first all-star win was in 1937 for a squad that featured Sammy Baugh. In the 1940s the games were competitive affairs that attracted large crowds to Soldier Field. But as the talent level of pro football improved, the all-stars had diminishing success. The last all-star win came in 1963, when a team coached by legendary quarterback Otto Graham beat the Green Bay Packers 20-17. By the 1970s, crowds for the event were dwindling. In addition, NFL coaches were reluctant to part with their new draftees (who would miss part of training camp) for a meaningless exhibition in which the players might be injured. A players' strike forced the cancellation of the 1974 game. The last game took place in a torrential downpour on July 23, 1976. Despite featuring stars such as Chuck Muncie, Mike Pruitt, Lee Roy Selmon and Jackie Slater, the collegians were hopelessly outclassed by the Pittsburgh Steelers. Pittsburgh was leading 24-0 late in the third quarter when play was suspended due to the awful weather conditions. The game was not restarted. Chicago Tribune Charities Inc., the sponsor of the game, elected not to bring it back for 1977. A program from the 1941 game is shown here. Overall, the NFL teams won 31 of the 42 games. The all-stars won nine. Two games ended in ties.
Tags: football  all-stars  NFL 
Added: 13th December 2010
Views: 34845
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Posted By: Lava1964
Tinker to Evers to Chance Back in the day when sports writing was at its gaudy peak, scribes often used poetry in their description of people and events. The most famous sports poem is likely this one penned by Franklin P. Adams: These are the saddest of possible words: 'Tinker to Evers to Chance.' Trio of bear cubs, and fleeter than birds, Tinker and Evers and Chance. Ruthlessly pricking our gonfalon bubble, Making a Giant hit into a double – Words that are heavy with nothing but trouble: 'Tinker to Evers to Chance.' This work was first published as 'That Double Play Again' in the July 12, 1910, New York Evening Mail. The Chicago Daily Tribune reprinted it as 'Gotham's Woe' on July 15, 1910. Three days later, on July 18, the New York Evening Mail republished it under the title by which it is best known today, 'Baseball's Sad Lexicon.' It described the double-play artistry of Chicago Cubs when the team was in its heyday in the first decade of the 20th century. (Yes, the Cubs actually had a heyday.) Second baseman Joe Tinker, shortstop Johnny Evers, and first baseman Frank Chance first played together in 1902. Although the poetic lament was accurate, the Cubs' famed trio never came close to leading the National League in double plays at any time. Nevertheless all three were inducted into the Hall of fame in 1946 largely because of Franklin Adams' doggerel. Based on sheer statistics, probably only Frank Chance deserves to be there. Although all three ballplayers are long dead, their double play prowess has been referenced in numerous literary works, movies, and TV shows as varied as Hogan's Heroes and The Brady Bunch.
Tags: baseball  Tinker  Evers  Chance  Chicago  Cubs 
Added: 4th January 2011
Views: 1722
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Posted By: Lava1964
Dewey Defeats Truman Headline The Chicago Tribune's erroneous headline became notorious after a happy Truman was photographed holding a copy of the paper during a stop at St. Louis Union Station while returning by train from his home in Independence, Missouri, to Washington, D.C. Dewey Defeats Truman Headline The Chicago Tribune Dewey Defeats Truman St. Louis Union Station Independence, Missouri
Tags: The  Chicago  Tribune  Dewey  Defeats  Truman    St.  Louis  Union  Station  Independence,  Missouri   
Added: 4th November 2014
Views: 4143
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Posted By: pfc
1901 Exhumation of Abraham Lincoln Here's a weird factoid: Since his assassination in 1865, Abraham Lincoln's remains have been exhumed or disinterred 17 times--and his coffin has been opened five times. Some of the exhumations have been totally understandable. His body was moved in and out of several temporary vaults while awaiting "permanent" burial. One unplanned exhumation happened in 1876. Lincoln's coffin was removed from its marble sarcophagus by a group of grave robbers who were caught almost immediately. Other times the Lincoln Tomb fell into a state of disrepair because the ground in was built upon was too soft. Thus Lincoln's body was removed and shabbily stored in the structure's basement pending the reconstruction work. Each time the coffin itself was actually disturbed, the guardians insisted on opening the casket to ensure Lincoln's remains were actually still inside. The last time this occurred was in 1901 when more renovations were done on Lincoln's deteriorating tomb to make the location more visitor friendly. Lincoln's coffin--which had been encased in a steel cage and buried beneath 10 feet of concrete as a means of discouraging grave robbers--was once more exhumed during the renovations. About 23 workers were on hand to see Lincoln re-interred one last time on September 26, 1901. Out of curiosity they checked the coffin once more to see if Abe was still there. He was. Although his face had turned a chalky white color, the corpse was remarkably well preserved after more than 36 years. Witnesses said that Lincoln's eyebrows were missing and the gloves upon his hands had rotted. Otherwise the face was instantly recognizable to anyone who had ever seen a photo of the famous president. It still bore the famous whiskers, mole, and a full head of wiry hair. The suit Lincoln was buried in--the same one he had worn to his 1865 inauguration--was still intact although it was covered in a fine yellow mold. There were also shreds of a disintegrated American flag upon the corpse. The last living person to have seen Lincoln's corpse was a 14-year-old boy named Fleetwood Lindley. Lindley's father had been one of the construction workers and had urged him to leave school early that day and go to Lincoln's Tomb to see something he would never forget. The boy was also permitted to hold one of the straps that lowered Lincoln's coffin back into its concrete cocoon. Interviewed by the Chicago Tribune about the experience in 1962, Lindley said seeing Lincoln's corpse did not bother him at first, but he said he had trouble sleeping for months afterward. Lindley died in February 1963 at the age of 75 just a few days after giving a final interview on the subject.
Tags: Abraham  Lincoln  exhumation  1901 
Added: 21st July 2015
Views: 1780
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Posted By: Lava1964

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