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Eddie Bennett - Baseball Mascot A hunchback or dwarf was once considered by sports teams to bring good luck. Many professional baseball teams had such a mascot. Hunchbacks were considered particularly lucky. Many players rubbed the mascot's back before batting, believing a hit was sure to follow. Eddie Bennett was such an object of luck, but he also became much more to the teams he worked for. From the beginning of his life, Eddie Bennett seemed to catch bad breaks. A childhood accident left Eddie with a crippling back injury stunting his growth and leaving him hunchbacked and permanently child-sized. His life was further disadvantaged when both his parents perished in the 1918 influenza epidemic. Crippled and orphaned, things looked bleak for the young kid from Flatbush. Eddie was a big baseball fan and frequently hung around the Polo Grounds. Happy Felsch of the Chicago White Sox took notice of the boy. Impressed by his cheery demeanor, the Sox adopted Eddie as their good luck charm. Eddie travelled with the team and they won the 1919 AL pennant. Eddie returned to Brooklyn for the 1920 season--and Brooklyn won the NL pennant that year. During the 1920 World Series, after winning two out of three games at home, the team left Eddie behind when they went on the road to play Cleveland. Without their lucky charm they promptly lost four straight games and the best-of-nine series. Eddie, dejected and offended, left the team in disgust. In 1921 Eddie latched onto the New York Yankees. Although still a good luck charm, Eddie established himself as a true professional batboy. He not only performed the typical duties of batboy, he also handled other tasks, enabling the players to focus on the game. He was a paid employee of the Yankees and took his job very seriously. Eddie ran errands for the players, procured their favorite foods, and became their confidant. Eddie was privy to every rumor and scandal regarding the Yankees during the Roaring Twenties but he kept his mouth shut. When Urban Shocker was suffering from serious heart problems late in his career, he roomed with Eddie. He honored the pitcher's wishes and kept Shocker's health issues from his teammates. Babe Ruth in particular became close to Eddie. Ruth and Bennett would enter the field early in batting practice and perform a comical warmup show. The much larger Ruth would continually throw the ball out of Eddie's reach, eventually backing him up to the backstop. Not one Ruthian homerun went by without Eddie being the first to shake his hand upon touching home plate. If you look at any team picture from 1921 to 1932, there is Eddie, front and center with a big wide grin on his face, the envy of every boy in America. In the 12 seasons Eddie was with the Yankees, they won seven AL pennants and four World Series. All this changed early in 1932 when Ediie was hit by a taxicab, breaking his leg. Due to his other health problems the injury healed slowly. By the end of the year it was clear that Eddie's fragile health was failing. Unable to perform his duties with the Yankees, he was nevertheless financially supported by team owner Jacob Ruppert for his past services to his club. But not being around the team anymore and the severe pain he suffered daily because of the accident took its toll on Eddie. He began drinking heavily. He passed away in 1935 after a three-week bender, surrounded in his room by mounds of priceless memorabilia from his years as baseball's most famous batboy.
Tags: baseball  mascot  Eddie  Bennett  Yankees  hunchback 
Added: 22nd February 2011
Views: 1957
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Posted By: Lava1964
1948 Easter Brunch From the pages of Seventeen magazine March 1948. An Easter brunch layout. Artwork by Valz. This is a very humble brunch by today's standards. Even for teens to give.I like the colored Easter eggs used for decoration. Better not touch those, I guess. LOL
Tags: Easter  1948  brunch  teens  VintageSeventeenMagazine   
Added: 24th April 2011
Views: 1885
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Posted By: AngoraSox
1964 No More Dial Phones Found in the February 1964 Seventeen magazine is a look at the Worlds Fair in NYC and the NEW telephones which are now push button instead of dial. There's even talk of new speaker phone telephones!
Tags: 1964  SeventeenMagazine  fashions  teens  WorldsFair    touchtone  telephones 
Added: 4th September 2011
Views: 2469
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Posted By: AngoraSox
The 33-Inning Baseball Game - 1981 The longest game in pro baseball history occurred at McCoy Stadium in 1981 between the home Pawtucket (RI) Red Sox and visiting Rochester (NY) Red Wings of the AAA International League. It lasted a mind-boggling 33 innings. The game began on Saturday, April 18 and lasted 32 innings before being stopped. Play resumed on June 23. Only one additional inning was required as Pawtucket won 3-2 in the bottom of the 33rd inning. The game included future Hall-of-Famers Wade Boggs and Cal Ripken Jr. and 23 others who would eventually advance to MLB. Ominously the start of the game was delayed 30 minutes while a bank of lights was repaired. The game was tied 1-1 after nine innings. It remained knotted for the next 11 innings due to strong performances by both bullpens. In the top of the 21st inning, Red Wings' catcher Dave Huppert doubled, driving in a run giving Rochester a 2-1 lead. In the bottom of the inning, Pawtucket's Wade Boggs hit a double to score Dave Koza and tie the game 2-2. According to league rules, a curfew was supposed to take effect at 1 AM. However, plate umpire Dennis Cregg had an out-of-date rule book; it was missing that provision. Thus the game continued for 11 more scoreless innings. At 2 AM Pawtucket reliever Luis Aponte, who had pitched the seventh through tenth innings, received permission to go home. When Aponte got home at 3 AM, his wife Xiomara angrily asked, "Where have you been?" The pitcher responded, "At the ballpark." His wife snapped, "Like hell you have!" Because news of the game didn't appear in most newspapers until Monday, Aponte spent two nights on the couch. At the start of the 30th inning, the game became the longest in professional history, surpassing a 29-inning game in the Florida State League on June 14, 1966. As the game dragged on, food supplies ran out in the clubhouse and players took drastic measures to keep warm in the April chill. This included burning the benches in the bullpens and the broken bats in the dugouts. Meanwhile, Pawtucket general manager Mike Tamburro was attempting to reach IL president Harold Cooper so he could intervene. Cooper was eventually reached. Horrified, he ordered the game suspended after the completion of the current inning. At 4:09 AM, at the end of the 32nd inning, the game was stopped and would be resumed at a later date. At this point, there were just 19 fans left in the ballpark from the original 1,740. (One was the nephew of umpire Cregg. He had fallen asleep.) Each was given a lifetime pass to McCoy Stadium by Pawtucket owner Ben Mondor. As the players left the stadium they encountered people on their way to sunrise church services for Easter Sunday. Play resumed on June 23 when the Red Wings next returned to Pawtucket. On hand for the resumption was a sellout crowd of 5,746 fans, four television networks, and 140 members of the press from around the world. The game required just one inning and 18 minutes to finish. Pawtucket's first three batters singled. Dave Koza's drove home Marty Barrett. This photo shows on-deck hitter Wade Boggs congratulating Barrett as he touches the plate. The game had lasted a combined 8 hours and 25 minutes. A total of 882 pitches had been thrown.
Tags: minor  league  baseball  marathon  33  innings 
Added: 12th September 2011
Views: 2413
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Posted By: Lava1964
1922 First Mobile Phone Tags:         World          first          mobile          cell          phone          technology          iphone          ipad          ipod          walkman          telephone          nokia          touch          samsung          sony          1920s          demonstration          trial          British          Pathe          Film          Archive          Original          Vintage          Footage          Newsreel          Movie          Video          Documentary          Clip          News          History          Historical 
Added: 2nd January 2012
Views: 3281
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Posted By: Old Fart
1932 NFL Championship Game One of the most important games in the history of the National Football League was the 1932 NFL Championship Game. It provided many firsts: Most significantly it was the NFL's first championship game--and it was the first NFL game to be played indoors. Prior to 1933 there was no official league championship game. The league title went to the team with the best record--which was often disputed because teams did not play anything resembling a balanced schedule. In 1932, both the Chicago Bears and Portsmouth (OH) Spartans had six wins and a loss. By rule, tie games were ignored in the standings. Portsmouth had four ties and the Bears had six! During the regular season, both games between the Bears and Spartans had ended in ties. With the NFL's blessings, the Bears and Spartans agreed to play a one-game tie-breaker at Chicago's Wrigley Field on December 18. However, a forecast of a blizzard and minus-40-degree temperatures prompted the game to be moved indoors to Chicago Stadium, an arena more suited for hockey than football. Dirt from a recent circus was spread on the arena's concrete floor to form somethin akin to a regular gridiron. The cozy confines forced some playing rules to be revised. Because there were only 80 yards between the goal lines, as soon as a team advanced the ball beyond midfield, it was moved back 20 yards! The goalposts were moved from the endline to the goal line (where they stayed until 1974). Also, because the field was ten yards narrower than usual, before every play from scrimmage the ball was placed between hashmarks ten yards from the sideline. Chicago won the game 9-0, all their points coming in the fourth quarter on a controversial forward-pass touchdown and a safety. (The touchdown play caused the NFL's passing rules to be modernized the following season.) Not long afterward the Spartans moved to Detroit and became the Lions. The game was a huge success and inspired the NFL to split itself into two divisions and hold an annual championship game between the divisional champs. That system determined the NFL champion each year until the Super Bowl era began in 1966.
Tags: football  NFL  1932  Championship 
Added: 14th January 2012
Views: 2901
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Posted By: Lava1964
Baseball Broadcaster Tom Cheek Tom Cheek was the smooth radio voice of the Toronto Blue Jays from the team's inception in 1977 until 2004. Largely unknown outside of Canada, his most famous call was of Joe Carter's World Series-winning home run in 1993: "Touch 'em all, Joe! You'll never hit a bigger home run in your life!" Remarkably, Cheek never missed a single Jays' broadcast until June 4, 2004 when he had to attend his father's funeral. His absence that night ended his streak of 4,306 consecutive regular-season games at the mike. Sadly, less than two weeks after his father's death, Cheek was diagnosed with a cancerous brain tumor. He left the broadcast booth to undergo treatment. He made only sporadic appearances at Jays' games after that. He did have a Lou Gehrig-type farewell appearance at Toronto's SkyDome in September 2004. The ceremony was sad and poignant. (Ken Singleton, a New York Yankees announcer, was so teary that he had to leave the broadcast booth.) Cheek died in October 2005 at the age of 66. He is honored in the Blue Jays' "Ring of Honor" at the SkyDome (now known as Rogers Centre) alongside the number 4,306.
Tags: Tom  Cheek  baseball  Toronto  Blue  Jays  announcer 
Added: 16th January 2012
Views: 1530
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Posted By: Lava1964
Last Female WWI veteran dies Florence Patterson Green never saw the front line. Her war was spent serving food, not dodging bullets. But Green, who died on February 4, 2012, aged 110, was the last known surviving veteran of World War I. She was serving with the Women's Royal Air Force as a waitress at an air base in eastern England when the guns fell silent on November 11, 1918. It was not until 2010 that she was officially recognized as a veteran after a researcher found her service record in Britain's National Archives. Green died Saturday at the Briar House Care Home in King's Lynn, eastern England, two weeks before her 111th birthday, the home said. Retired Air Vice-Marshal Peter Dye, director-general of the RAF Museum, said it was fitting that the last survivor of the first global war was someone who had served on the home front. "In a way, that the last veteran should be a lady and someone who served on the home front is something that reminds me that warfare is not confined to the trenches," Dye said. "It reminds us of the Great War, and all warfare since then has been something that involved everyone. It's a collective experience ... Sadly, whether you are in New York, in London, or in Kandahar, warfare touches all of our lives." She was born Florence Beatrice Patterson in London on February 19, 1901, and joined the newly formed Women's Royal Air Force in September 1918 at the age of 17. The service trained women to work as mechanics, drivers and in other jobs to free men for front-line duty. Green went to work as a steward in the officers' mess, first at the Narborough airdrome and then at RAF Marham in eastern England, and was serving there when the war ended. The photo below was taken in February 2010 at a celebration of Florence's 109th birthday.
Tags: Florence  Patterson  Green  WWI  veteran 
Added: 8th February 2012
Views: 1296
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Posted By: Lava1964
The Man Show One of the more over-the-top TV shows to hit the airwaves in recent years was The Man Show. From 1999 to 2004 it was a half-hour program that aired on Comedy Central. It was created in 1999 by its two original co-hosts, Jimmy Kimmel and Adam Carolla. Kimmel had earlier gained a following hosting the offbeat game show Win Ben Stein's Money on the same cable network. The Man Show overtly and proudly celebrated the stereotypical loutish male perspective in a sexually charged, humorous light. The show consisted of a variety of pre-recorded comedy sketches and live in-studio events, usually requiring audience participation. The show tried to touch on all the aspects of alpha-maleness: excessive drinking, the sexualization of women, obsession with sports, and general lack of refinement. Typical of the fare on The Man Show was a recurring segment called Wheel of Destiny in which a lucky participant selected from the studio audience could win one of four desirable prizes (such as an erotic massage from two female porn stars or $10 in cash) or one of four undesirable prizes (such as "Adam pees on your wallet" or having a sumo wrestler sit on your face). Each show routinely ended with a slow-motion video montage of comely females in lingerie jumping on trampolines. Shakespeare it wasn't--but it had its moments. Kimmel and Carolla left The Man Show in 2003. With new co-hosts Joe Rogan and Doug Stanhouse taking over the helm, the show lost much of its luster and lasted just one more season before being cancelled. A total of 114 episodes were made in five seasons. The Man Show's first four seasons are available on DVD.
Tags: comedy  Man  Show  Jimmy  Kimmel  Adam  Carolla 
Added: 17th June 2012
Views: 5814
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Posted By: Lava1964
THE Rotary Phone The rotary dial with holes was first introduced in 1904 but did not enter service in the Bell System until 1919 Have you ever watched an old television show and seen a rotary style telephone sitting on the table? Ever wonder how to use that phone? Well today is your lucky day! You are about to find out how to do just that. 1Remove the handset from the cradle.(The cradle is where the phone rests when not in use) 2Place the handset to your ear and listen for a dial tone. 3Use the index finger from your other hand to dial the first number. Do so by placing the finger in the dial's hole that is above the number you wish to dial. The dial, is also called the finger wheel, is circular. 4Rotate the dial clockwise until your finger touches the metal stop. Remove your finger from the opening to allow the dial to rotate to its original position. 5Find your second number and repeat step three and four. Do this for the remaining numbers. When you are finished with your conversation, simply place the phone back on the cradle. NOTE, If you have long or decorated fingernails, and are concerned that dialing might damage them, you may use the eraser end of a pencil to dial.
Tags: Rotary  Phone  finger  wheel  circular 
Added: 9th July 2012
Views: 2575
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Posted By: mia_bambina

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