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Some Age More Gracefully   Ursula at 70 Former Bond girl Ursula Andress has signed to be the new face of Dior Beauty cosmetics. The 70-year-old actress, who shot to fame rising from the sea in a white bikini in 1962 Bond flick DR NO, celebrated the deal by throwing a lavish party at her Beverly Hills, California home.
Tags: ursula  andress  bond  films  actress 
Added: 30th September 2007
Views: 1959
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Posted By: Guido
Fatty Arbuckle Scandal 1921 One of the most tragic figures in movie history was Roscoe (Fatty) Arbuckle. A onetime cabaret singer, Arbuckle was among the most popular actors in silent comedies from 1914 to 1921. Starting as an extra at Keystone Studios, the surprisingly nimble Arbuckle quickly graduated to starring roles in the studio's slapstick comedy films where he was noted for his terrific accuracy in throwing pies and other missiles. Later, like Charlie Chaplin, Arbuckle matured as a performer, adding brilliantly subtle aspects to his comedy routines. A box-office favorite, he was making a seven-figure salary at Paramount Pictures in 1921. Midway through that year Arbuckle was so popular that he was put to work on three feature comedy films simultaneously! Shortly after completing them, Arbuckle's career abruptly ended in scandal. He was accused of sexually assaulting small-time actress Virginia Rappe at a party he was hosting in a suite at the St. Francis Hotel in San Francisco on Labor Day 1921. Rappe died four days later in a maternity hosptal of peritonitis from a ruptured bladder, presumably caused by the 266-pound Arbuckle forcing himself on her. (There was also an apocryphal story of Rappe being raped with a champagne or cola bottle. How this slanderous story started is anyone's guess.) Rappe had become violently ill and irrational at the party. Arbuckle and several partygoers tried to succor Rappe and eventually moved her to another hotel room where she was examined by three different doctors over the next three days. A postmortem on Rappe's body found no signs of sexual assault whatsoever. In all likelihood Rappe death's was due to medical negligence or malpractice. Moreover, Rappe was hardly the virginal victim that the popular press and D.A.'s office portrayed her to be. The mistress of director Henry Lehrman, Rappe had had at least four abortions by the time she was 16, she had an out-of-wedlock child that she had abandoned, and she was afflicted with gonorrhea. In the summer of 1921 the 26-year-old Rappe, who hadn't had an acting job in two years, recently underwent another illegal abortion. Rappe was also suffering from a chronic illness that was exacerbated by her taste for poor-quality Prohibition booze. The accusations against Arbuckle were based solely on a malicious complaint fabricated by party attendee Maude Delmont, a known extortionist who claimed to be a "lifelong friend" of Rappe's--but had only known Rappe for two days prior to the Labor Day party. Arbuckle was astounded when a horde of reporters descended upon his Hollywood mansion to tell him he was being investigated for rape and possible murder charges in Rappe's death. Beginning in late September, Arbuckle was tried three times for rape and manslaughter in the space of seven months. He spent $700,000 on legal fees to beat the bogus charges. The prosecution's case was absurdly weak and should have been dropped. In fact, complainant Delmont was never called as a witness because her wild story of Arbuckle assaulting Rappe for an hour did not jibe with the physical evidence nor the timeline of events at the party. Nevertheless, the San Francisco D.A.'s office doggedly pursued the charges against Arbuckle because of intense pressure by reformers and moralists. The first two trials resulted in hung juries. At the first trial, Arbuckle fared terrifically when he eagerly took the stand to defend himself. It ended with the jury voting 10-2 in favor of acquittal. One stubborn holdout was a militant feminist so determined to convict Arbuckle that she refused to read any portions of the trial's transcript or listen to other jurors' opinions--to the point of childishly putting her hands over her ears! The second trial, in which Arbuckle's legal team badly advised him not to bother to take the stand because his innocence was obvious, was surprisingly 9-3 in favor of conviction! At the third trial, in April 1922, Arbuckle wisely took the stand. The jury deliberated for a mere six minutes before returning with a not guilty verdict that was loudly cheered by the gallery. Furthermore, the jury also insisted a formal apology to Arbuckle be read into the trials' official transcript. Film historians generally believe Arbuckle was totally innocent of any wrongdoing and was the victim of malicious prosecution. Nevertheless, his acting career abruptly ended because newly appointed Hollywood censorship czar Will Hays banned distributors from showing any Arbuckle comedies despite being acquitted! Although filmdom was deprived of a master comic's work, Arbuckle stayed in movies by directing films under an assumed name. He was just beginning to make an acting comeback--with six two-reel comedie--when died of heart failure in 1933 at age 46. According to Arbuckle biographer David A. Yallop, in an era when Hollywood stars routinely engaged in all sorts of debauchery, Roscoe, ironically, "was probably the most chaste man in Hollywood."
Tags: Roscoe  Fatty  Arbuckle  scandal  1921 
Added: 16th November 2007
Views: 2086
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Posted By: Lava1964
George Blanda passes at age 83 George Blanda, the ageless Hall of Fame quarterback and kicker with the Oakland Raiders, has died. He was 83. The Raiders confirmed the death Monday and issued a statement saying "we are deeply saddened by the passing of the great George Blanda. George was a brave Raider and a close personal friend of Raiders owner Al Davis." Blanda retired a month shy of his 49th birthday before the 1976 season, playing longer than anyone else in pro football history. He spent 10 seasons with the Chicago Bears, part of one with the Baltimore Colts, seven with the Houston Oilers and his final nine with the Raiders. He scored 2,002 points in his career, a pro football record at the time of his retirement, kicking 335 field goals and 943 extra points, running for nine touchdowns and throwing for 236 more.
Tags: George  Blanda  Oakland  Raiders  Football  NFL  National  Football  Leauge  Field  Goal  Kicker  Quarterback 
Added: 27th September 2010
Views: 995
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Posted By: Old Fart
America Comes of Age The Korean War America Comes of Age - The Korean War Like Lambs to the Slaughter US defense spending had reached a modern day low. The military was ill-prepared and ill-equipped, those in authority embraced questionable doctrines. From a post World War II soft life in Japan, with servants to wash their clothes and shine their boots, these American youth were suddenly uprooted and flung into harm's way. There was no "Remember Pearl Harbor." The North Korean People's Army was on a roll. The North Korean People's Army had invaded the Republic of Korea in South Korea only 11 days earlier and overwhelmed the ill-equipped Republic of Korea armed forces. The North Korean People's Army steamrolled into Seoul, driving refugees and regrouping Republic of Korea Army units before it, clogging roads and throwing the countryside into a panic. The invasion caught General Douglas MacArthur and his Far East Command and Eighth Army by surprise, despite recent intelligence reports that North Korea was planning for an attack on the Republic of Korea. General MacArthur had disregarded the reports, saying he did not believe war with North Korea was imminent. The events that unfolded on the Korean peninsula some 45 years ago offer a telling reminder of what happens when a force goes to war unprepared. Disaster lurks around every bend. Facing a force of 130,000 NKP soldiers, 3,000 Soviet advisors, a full array of heavy weapons, aircraft and the formidable T-34/85, arguably the best tank to come out of World War II. American GIs fought bravely at times. At other times when confronted with overwhelming, numerically superior forces, they "bugged-out" to the rear, cursing their government for sending them to this stinking, God-forsaken place where human feces were used to fertilize the land. Photos The Library of Congress The Korean War National Museum U.S. Army Center of Military History Democratic People's Republic of Korea Audio Clips The Library of Congress - Veterans History Project Wessel's Living History Farm Music Perry Como Far Away Places Aaron Copeland Fanfare for the Common Man John Williams Saving Private Ryan Omaha beach Hymn to the Fallen conceived and produced by: Dale Caruso For more information about the Korean War http://www.army.mil/cmh/ http://www.korea50.mil/ http://americanradioworks.publicradio... http://www.paulnoll.com/Korea/index.html http://www.loc.gov/vets/ http://www.koreanwar.org/html/units/2...
Tags: Korean    War    1950 
Added: 25th September 2008
Views: 1147
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Posted By: dalecaruso
Doc Ellis This is a photo of former Pittsburgh Pirates pitcher Doc Ellis, who died of a liver ailment at age 63 on December 19, 2008. His heyday was the early 1970s. Ellis is most famous for throwing a no-hitter versus the San Diego Padres on June 12, 1970 when he was tripping on LSD.
Tags: Dock  Ellis  LSD  baseball 
Added: 5th January 2009
Views: 734
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Posted By: Lava1964
Hal Chase - Crooked Ballplayer In the early years of the twentieth century, many ballplayers supplemented their paltry incomes by doing favors for gamblers. No one was more brazen in throwing games than first baseman Hal Chase. The handsome Chase was undeniably the best fielding first baseman in the major leagues, but his penchant for deliberately losing games for his gambler friends with timely errors made Chase wear out his welcome on numerous clubs. Fans often yelled, 'What's the odds, Hal?' whenever he took the field.
Tags: Hal  Chase   
Added: 13th May 2009
Views: 1417
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Posted By: Lava1964
Robert Stanfield Fumble Photo Think liberal media bias is only common to American politics? Think again! Robert Stanfield is often referred to by Canada's political right as 'the greatest prime minister Canada never had.' On May 30, 1974, during the Canadian federal election campaign, photographer Doug Ball captured his most famous image--a shot of Conservative candidate Robert Stanfield dropping a football during a rest stop at North Bay, Ontario. '[Stanfield was] knock-kneed, hands clasped awkwardly, grimacing as a football slipped between his bony fingers,' recalled Ball. It was the defining photo of Stanfield’s political career. That afternoon, Stanfield aide Brad Chapman brought out a football for some exercise, and Ball shot 36 pictures of Stanfield throwing, catching and--just once--awkwardly fumbling the football. In a glaring example of ‘image politics’ all too common in Canada, the Toronto Globe and Mail ran the unflattering picture on its front page under the headline, 'A political fumble?' No Canadian newspaper ran any of the 35 available photos of Stanfield catching the ball. The photo may have cost him the election, but Stanfield never held any grudges about the photo, which won Ball a national newspaper award. He autographed a copy it for Ball more than a decade later, signing, ‘To Doug: I should’ve taken off my tie. Robert Stanfield.’
Tags: media  bias  Robert  Stanfield  football  fumble  photo 
Added: 18th September 2010
Views: 3312
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Posted By: Lava1964
Harvey Haddix Tough Loss Baseball losses don't come much tougher than the one suffered by Harvey Haddix of the Pittsburgh Pirates on May 26, 1959. Pitching in Milwaukee's County Stadium against the defending National League champion Braves, the diminutive left-handed Haddix set down batter after batter. The trouble was that Milwaukee's Lew Burdette was fashioning a shutout too. After nine innings the score was tied 0-0, but only Haddix was perfect. Haddix got through 12 innings unscathed. However Milwaukee's Felix Mantilla reached first base on a throwing error by Pirates' third baseman Don Hoak to open the bottom of the 13th inning. Mantilla advanced to second base on a sacrifice bunt by Eddie Mathews. Hank Aaron was intentionally walked to set up a force play. Joe Adcock blasted an apparent home run to end the game. Aaron foolishly left the basepath after Mantilla scored. Adcock was called out for passing Aaron and only got credit for a double. The game officially went into the books as a 1-0 Braves' win. Haddix went into the books as the man who retired 36 straight batters from the start of a game--yet lost.
Tags: Harvey  Haddix  baseball  pitcher 
Added: 5th June 2010
Views: 1013
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Posted By: Lava1964
Pop Qwiz Popcorn 1990 1990s Colors included yellow, blue, green, and a mystery bag with a surprise color. I'm not sure how many of you will remember this stuff, but it was just too weird not to mention. Video store chains became especially popular during the early 90s; a fact proven by the insidious amount of Blockbuster commercials strewn into TV breaks at the time. As more and more movie nights were staged from home, popcorn finally shed its "theater treat" stigma for good while sales soared. Those microwaveable bags of kernels became and remain a staple in most households, with several companies competing for the coveted top spot. Yes, there's competition in popcorn. So how do you make one popcorn more attractive than the other? For the most part, it's all the same shit. Covering the packaging with pretty colors and in-your-face fonts only took these companies so far, and while dubious additions like cheddar dust and Cajun red spice helped differentiate the products, General Mills had something else in mind. Something strange. "Pop Qwiz." Perhaps the first and only popcorn marketed exclusively towards children. Thrown under General Mills' "Pop Secret" banner, Pop Qwiz really broke the mold. Junk food with a gimmick is common nowadays, but this stuff was pretty unique in 1991. Basically, it was just regular, buttered popcorn dyed in every color of the rainbow. You had bags of red popcorn, blue popcorn, green, yellow, you name it. That alone was sure to bring in a substantial clientele -- kids'll eat anything that looks odd. Pop Qwiz had more to offer than weird colors, though. While each of the mini-sized bags had correspondently bright colors, the colors of the bags didn't necessarily match the shade of the popcorn within. What was surely just a cost cutting measure was sold to us as a "game" -- it was up to us to guess which popcorn color was in each bag. The point of the game is up for debate, as we got to eat all of the popcorn even if we guessed wrong. Taking things even further, the bags had all sorts of quizzes, puzzles, and other stupid games printed right on 'em. Children always appreciate things tailored specifically for them, and while popcorn wasn't an important victory, we took it with great pride. We had our own popcorn. Tomorrow, the world. You'd have to imagine that some kids would've begged for Pop Qwiz just by passing the colorful box in grocery stores, but the point was really driven home with General Mills' ad campaign. This was crucial for ten trillion reasons, and I swear, I've counted. Okay, how often do you see popcorn advertised during children's programming hours? It's pretty rare, so Pop Qwiz was playing to an audience its competitors never even thought to tackle. Another point: when a kid wants popcorn, words are rarely minced. "I want popcorn." That's all that's ever said. No specific brands are mentioned, no bias towards one particular popcorn is conveyed. Just a simple "I want popcorn." By throwing the "Pop Qwiz" title in our heads, General Mills created a sense of inadvertent brand loyalty. If we wanted popcorn, we asked for popcorn. If we wanted crazy wacky colored popcorn, we asked for Pop Qwiz. And what kid wouldn't always prefer crazy wacky colored popcorn? This was all much more brilliant than it seemed on the surface, and the commercial was a real keeper to boot. I know I focus more on earlier years with these articles, but as I was entering my ugly, lonely teen years during the 90s, I ended up watching a whole lot more television. Alone. This "Pop Qwiz" ad, to me, is just as synonymous with the time as any of the big ones, including that PSA where the Ninja Turtles exposed the dangers of marajuana. It surprises me that the snacks weren't very successful -- I guess the world just wasn't ready to accept, much less eat radioactive green popcorn. Artists are so often unappreciated in own their time, even if they only work in kernels.
Tags: Pop  Qwiz  Popcorn  1990 
Added: 19th August 2012
Views: 1532
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Posted By: masonx31
Its A Wonderful Life- Lasso the Moon Donna Reed was to throw a rock into the window of the Granville House, Frank Capra hired a marksman to shoot it out for her on cue. To everyone's amazement, Donna Reed broke the window with true aim and heft without the assistance of the hired marksman. Reed had played baseball in high school and had a strong throwing arm.
Tags: Its  A  Wonderful  Life  Lasso  the  Moon  Granville  House  James  Stewart  Donna  Reed  Lionel  Barrymore  Henry  Travers  "The  Greatest  Gift"  by  Philip  Van  Doren  Stern  Frank  Capra  1945  1940s  40s  movie  trivia   
Added: 12th December 2012
Views: 2910
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Posted By: Cliffy

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