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Cut The Cheese Superbowl Commercial irony is sliced THICK in this butcher shop . .
Tags: bud  light        cut  the  cheese  commercial 
Added: 28th December 2008
Views: 1578
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Posted By: Teresa
Umpire Bill Klem 'I never called one wrong!' Bill Klem once immodestly told a reporter. Klem is still widely regarded as baseball's greatest umpire nearly 70 years after he last worked a game. He was a National League arbiter from 1906 through 1941. The innovative Klem (pictured here in 1914) was the first umpire to wear an inside chest protector and the first to use hand signals to keep fans and players informed about his calls. (Klem said, 'The fan in the 25-cent bleacher seat has just as much right to know what I called as the fan in the box seat near home plate.') Klem was so skilled at calling balls and strikes that he only worked behind the plate for a number of years. He worked 18 World Series--a record that will never be broken because MLB now uses a rotation system rather than a merit system to assign umpires to post-season games. Klem was affectionately called 'The Old Arbitrator'--a nickname he adored. The jowly and thick-lipped Klem hated the nickname 'Catfish.' Any player who addressed him that way was quickly ejected. He had a strange relationship with New York Giants' manager John McGraw. Off the field the two were good friends; on the field they feuded bitterly. My favorite Bill Klem story: In 1941, while working the bases, he called a runner out on a tag play at second base. The runner angrily insisted the tag had missed him. Klem informed the irate player, 'I thought you were out.' Then the realization hit him: For the first time in his long career Klem only thought a player was out--he wasn't certain. Klem resigned the next day.
Tags: baseball  umpire  Bill  Klem 
Added: 1st September 2009
Views: 1943
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Posted By: Lava1964
Marvin Gay Blurred Lines errr Got to Give It Up Sounds so much a like.
Tags: Marvin  Gay  Blurred  Lines  errr  Got  to  Give  It  Up  Robin  Thicke   
Added: 5th January 2014
Views: 2552
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Posted By: Music Maiden
Jethro Tull - Thick As A Brick More fun from Ian and the lads..
Tags:  
Added: 3rd January 2009
Views: 1355
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Posted By: tullcat
Boston Molasses Disaster 1919 On January 15, 1919, one of the strangest disasters in American history killed 21 people in Boston. A enormous holding tank belonging to the Purity Distilling Company containing 2.3 million gallons of molasses burst under pressure. (Molasses was a common sweetener of the era; it could also be distilled into alcohol.) A tidal wave of the sticky goo anywhere from 8 to 15 feet high swept over the neighbourhood moving at an estimated speed of 35 mph. The force of the wave collapsed buildings and part of the elevated railway system. Some victims died in the wreckage of crushed buildings. Others simply drowned in the thick goo. The holding tank was certainly defective and Purity Distilling was found criminally liable, but the exact cause of the catastrophe was never ascertained.
Tags: Boston  Molasses  Disaster 
Added: 29th July 2009
Views: 1904
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Posted By: Lava1964
The Shining 1980 TV trailer Unfortunately thick with broadcast static as it was recorded via antenna in 1980, but the still-eerie television trailer for director Stanley Kubrick's adaptation of the Stephen King novel "The Shining". Jack Nicholson, Shelley Duvall, Danny Lloyd and Scatman Crothers star in the terrifying tale of a family subject to the horrors of a haunted resort hotel sealed off from the rest of the world by the winter snow.
Tags: the  shining  movie  trailer  tv  preview  television  horror  Stanley  Kubick  Stephen  King  Jack  Nicholson  Shelley  Duvall   
Added: 20th January 2010
Views: 1115
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Posted By: robatsea
1974 Time Magazine Global Cooling Story Although Richard Nixon was featured on the cover of the June 24, 1974 issue of Time magazine, from a historian's point of view the most interesting article within that edition was a doom-and-gloom story about the inevitable onset of global cooling. Yep, global cooling--not global warming. The article said, 'Telltale signs are everywhere from the unexpected persistence and thickness of pack ice in the waters around Iceland to the southward migration of a warmth-loving creature like the armadillo from the Midwest. Since the 1940s the mean global temperature has dropped about 2.7 F. Although that figure is at best an estimate, it is supported by other convincing data. When climatologist George J. Kukla of Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory and his wife Helena analyzed satellite weather data for the Northern Hemisphere, they found that the area of the ice and snow cover had suddenly increased by 12% in 1971 and the increase has persisted ever since. Areas of Baffin Island in the Canadian Arctic, for example, were once totally free of any snow in summer; now they are covered year round.' Hmm.
Tags: global  cooling  Time  magazine 
Added: 5th February 2011
Views: 7577
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Posted By: Lava1964
Declaration of Independence Copy Found in Picture Frame Fans of flea markets and garage sales were heartened by this improbable story from the spring of 1991: A collector who spent $4 at a Pennsylvania flea market two years ago for a dismal painting because he liked the frame is the possessor of a rare first printing of the Declaration of Independence. It is valued somewhere between $800,000 and $1 million. David N. Redden, head of the book and manuscript department at Sotheby's in Manhattan, described the document, found behind the painting when the collector took the frame apart, as an 'unspeakably fresh copy' of the declaration. 'The fact that it has been in the backing of the frame preserved it,' he said. Of the 24 copies known to survive, only three are in private hands. Mr. Redden said the unidentified owner bought the painting, 'a dismal dark country scene with a signature he could not make out,' only for its gilded and ornately carved frame. He told Mr. Redden that he discarded the painting, which he disliked. When he realized the frame was crudely made and unsalvageable he got rid of it too. 'But he kept the declaration, which he had found behind the painting,' Mr. Redden said. 'It was folded up, about the size of a business envelope. He thought it might be an early 19th-century printing and worth keeping as a curiosity.' Recently the owner showed it to a friend 'who urged him to look into it further,' said Selby Kiffer, an Americana printing specialist at Sotheby's 'At that point he called us.' Said Kiffer, 'The discovery of any first-printing copy of the declaration, even a fragmentary one or a poor copy, would be exciting, but on this one, the condition is beyond reproach. It was folded up when we first saw it--the way the owner said it was in the painting, less than one-tenth of an inch thick. I had to agree with him it was just as well that he kept it that way. There has been absolutely no restoration, no repair. It was unframed and unbacked.' Only seven of the 24 copies are unbacked, he said, which increases their value. 'The ink was still wet on this copy when it was folded,' Mr. Kiffer said. The very first line -- 'In Congress, July 4, 1776' -- shows up in the bottom margin in reverse, as a faint offsetting or shadow printing, one more proof of the urgency John Dunlap, the printer, and others felt in dispersing this document.
Tags: Declaration  of  Independence  copy  found 
Added: 10th February 2011
Views: 5881
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Posted By: Lava1964
London Great Smog - 1952 On Friday, December 5, 1952 a substantial fog rolled across London, England. This was not a particularly rare occurrence in that city. What made it memorable and lethal was the fact that it stayed for the better part of four days and basically brought the British capital to a standstill. The first week in December 1952 brought unusually cold weather to Great Britain. An unusual weather system known as an anticyclone moved over London. (Anticyclones are high pressure systems that create stationary surface hazes.) Not only was the thickening mist not moving, the smoke from the city's coal-burning furnaces in homes and offices was also trapped. In the early 1950s, the coal used in most London households was of a lower grade than the type used before the Second World War. (The higher quality coal was saved for export.) It also had a high sulfur content. Because the anticyclone was trapping both the fog and the coal smoke, the city was engulfed in a stinky blanket of mist that made many basic outdoor activities impossible. Driving became a dangerous adventure. City buses moved at a snail's pace, often with policemen preceding them on foot with torches. Within a short while bus service stopped altogether due to the low visibility. (The unaffected London Underground kept its schedule, however). Private cars were abandoned on the streets. Most outdoor activities, including sports events, were cancelled. The smog became so bad that it began to seep into indoor venues. Movie theaters and concert halls had to cancel shows because of diminished visibility. Finally, after four days of intense smog, a new weather system cleared London's skies on Tuesday, December 9. However, about 4,000 Londoners died from respiratory illnesses shortly thereafter related to breathing the unhealthy coal smoke. Health officials later put the death toll at about 12,000 from the lingering effects of what became known as The Great Smog. In 1956 the British parliament passed the Clean Air Act which mandated pollution controls and restricted furnaces to burning pollution-free fuels. The legislation worked. London has not experienced anything even close to The Great Smog of 1952 in all the years since then.
Tags: London  Great  Smog  pollution 
Added: 4th November 2015
Views: 1022
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Posted By: Lava1964

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