Welcome Guest! YouRememberThat.com is 100% FREE & fast to join! Upload, comment, create your own profile and more!



Check our brand new site TheRetroSite , although YouRememberThat will remain for quite some time we expect this new site to be our new home. Click over and create your account on the new mobile friendly and flexible site today!
Search
Search:
 
1977 Betamax Commercial One of the first commercially successful home video systems--Betamax--is advertised in this 1977 commercial.
Tags: Betamax  commercial 
Added: 17th March 2008
Views: 1000
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Krakatoa Erupts 1883 The beginning of the amazing events at Krakatoa in 1883 date to May 20 when there were initial rumblings and venting from the volcano, which had been dormant for about 200 years. Over the next three months, there were regular small blasts from Krakatoa out of three vents. On August 11, ash started spewing from the small mountain. Eruptions got progressively stronger until August 26, when the catastrophe began. At noon, the volcano sent an ash cloud 20 miles into the air and tremors triggered several tsunamis. This turned out to be just a small indication, however, of what would follow the next day. For four-and-a-half hours beginning at 5:30 a.m. on August 27, there were four major and incredibly powerful eruptions. The last of these made the loudest sound ever recorded on the planet. It could be heard as far away as central Australia and the island of Rodrigues, 3,000 miles from Krakatoa. The air waves created by the eruption were detected at points all over the earth. The eruption had devastating effects on the islands near Krakatoa. It set off tremendous tsunamis that overwhelmed hundreds of villages on the coasts of Java and Sumatra. Water pushed inland several miles in certain places, with coral blocks weighing 600 tons ending up on shore. At least 35,000 people died, though exact numbers were impossible to determine. The tsunamis traveled nearly around the world--unusually high waves were noticed thousands of miles away the next day. The volcano threw so much rock, ash and pumice into the atmosphere that, in the immediate area, the sun was virtually blocked out for a couple of days. Within a couple of weeks, the sun appeared in strange colors to people all over the world because of all the fine dust in the stratosphere. Over the ensuing three months, the debris high in the sky produced vivid red sunsets. In one case, fire engines in Poughkeepsie, New York, were dispatched when people watching a sunset were sure that they were seeing a fire in the distance. Further, there is speculation that Edvard Munch's 1893 painting "The Scream" depicting a psychedelic sunset may have actually been a faithful rendering of what Munch saw in Norway in the years following the eruption of Krakatoa. The amount of dust in the atmosphere also filtered enough sun and heat that global temperatures fell significantly for a couple of years. Krakatoa was left only a tiny fraction of its former self. However, in the intervening years, a small island, Anak Krakatoa ("Son of Krakatoa") has arisen from the sea. It is growing at an average of five inches every week. This island is receiving a great deal of scientific attention, as it represents a chance to see how island ecosystems are established from scratch.
Tags: History 
Added: 4th December 2014
Views: 481
Rating:
Posted By: WestVirginiaRebel
Y2K Doomsday Hysteria As the year 2000 approached, dire predictions of 'Y2K' major computer malfunctions were predicted for Monday, January 1, 2000. Why? It was feared that the majority of the world's computers--which operated with only a two-digit date to account for the year--would crash because of the double zero. The doomsday crowd predicted the infrastructures of cities would cease to function, transportation systems would come to a screeching halt, financial institutions would be rendered helpless, and chaos would generally be widespread. Businesses small and large were frantically urged to upgrade their computers by the end of 1999 to four-digit years. Companies that sold survival gear reported increased sales as some overly concerned people prepared for civilization around them to crumble. It didn't happen. Only a few minor incidents were reported on January 1, 2000 and the days that followed--which were all quickly rectified. Among the problems: The clock at the U.S. Naval Observatory claimed the date was 'January 1, 19100.' The same peculiar date was reported on computers at some Japanese government offices. About 150 slot machines would not work at a Delaware casino. A Buffalo, NY man who returned a video rental a day late was given a bill that said he owed more than $36,500. (Presumably the video store's computer calculated a 100-year late fee.) Italy and South Korea, two countries regarded as not being especially well prepared for Y2K, had as few problems as zealously prepared countries, leading many people to conclude the Y2K hand-wringing and hysteria was largely unwarranted.
Tags: Y2K  hysteria  computers 
Added: 17th December 2009
Views: 7464
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Polio Vaccine Campaign 1954 From 1916 through 1952 the United States and Canada experienced horrible outbreaks of polio every few years. At one point, one out of every 5000 children was diagnosed with the dreaded disease. Polio is a virus which can be contracted through contacting bodily fluids from someone already infected. Early symptoms might include headaches and a runny nose. However, once the virus moves to the central nervous system, it can cause paralysis and even death. Sneezing and coughing accelerate the spread of polio. Therefore there was justifiable panic in communities when outbreaks occurred. Public gathering places would be declared off limits. (Swimming pools were typically the first places to be closed.) Municipal parks would be eerily vacant. Researchers later determined, somewhat ironically, that young children were most susceptible to polio because most North American births in the 20th century occurred in the sterile environs of hospitals. These newborns did not naturally come in contact with small amounts of the disease as did their ancestors who were born at home. Accordingly, their immune systems did not develop sufficient resistance to the virus. Researchers Jonas Salk and Albert Sabin worked separately to find a cure. Both believed that by exposing children to minute traces of the virus through immunizations their immune systems would build up a lifetime immunity to polio. Salk favored vaccine containing the dead polio virus while Sabin favored live-virus vaccine. In 1954, two years after the terrible 1952 outbreak, more than 1.83 million children volunteered to be "polio pioneers" and serve as guinea pigs for Salk's virus. As a reward for their bravery, each was given a lollipop, plus a button and certificate acknowledging participation in the program. None of the volunteers contracted polio.
Tags: polio  research  vaccine  volunteers 
Added: 13th May 2012
Views: 1470
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Life Call Commercial - Mrs Fletcher For some reason this 1987 commercial became extremely well known in pop culture. It is for Life Call alarm systems--a product designed for seniors to summon emergency services at the touch of a button if they are experiencing medical issues. Mrs. Fletcher's plaintiff cry, "I've fallen...and I can't get up!" became something of an all-purpose catch phrase.
Tags: Life  Call  Mrs  Fletcher  fallen 
Added: 23rd November 2012
Views: 1291
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Life Call Commercial Parody The 1987 TV commercial for Life Call alarm systems is so well known that it has inspired numerous parodies. (There are about a dozen on YouTube.) Here is one of the more amusing ones recently made.
Tags: Mrs  Fletcher  Life  Call  commercial  parody   
Added: 23rd November 2012
Views: 1255
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
YMCA Nude Swimming Classes Many stories that your parents and grandparents tell you about the 'good old days' seem far-fetched, but some are actually true. Consider this one: For many years it was mandatory for male swimmers at YMCAs to wear absolutely nothing while in their pools. Based on a recommendation from public health officials, a similar measure was on the books and usually rigorously enforced in American high schools from 1926 to 1962. Why? For many years swimsuits were made of materials that shed fibers and clogged filtration systems. There was also the belief that nude swimming was somehow more healthful and sanitary than swimming in trunks. (Curiously no such rules were ever implemented in female swim classes.) In 1941 Life magazine printed a half-page photo of such a class as an example of 'democracy.' By the early 1960s, however, public sentiment began favoring modesty over nudity and the nude swim classes became a thing of the past.
Tags: nude  swimming  classes  YMCA 
Added: 20th April 2015
Views: 2501
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
London Great Smog - 1952 On Friday, December 5, 1952 a substantial fog rolled across London, England. This was not a particularly rare occurrence in that city. What made it memorable and lethal was the fact that it stayed for the better part of four days and basically brought the British capital to a standstill. The first week in December 1952 brought unusually cold weather to Great Britain. An unusual weather system known as an anticyclone moved over London. (Anticyclones are high pressure systems that create stationary surface hazes.) Not only was the thickening mist not moving, the smoke from the city's coal-burning furnaces in homes and offices was also trapped. In the early 1950s, the coal used in most London households was of a lower grade than the type used before the Second World War. (The higher quality coal was saved for export.) It also had a high sulfur content. Because the anticyclone was trapping both the fog and the coal smoke, the city was engulfed in a stinky blanket of mist that made many basic outdoor activities impossible. Driving became a dangerous adventure. City buses moved at a snail's pace, often with policemen preceding them on foot with torches. Within a short while bus service stopped altogether due to the low visibility. (The unaffected London Underground kept its schedule, however). Private cars were abandoned on the streets. Most outdoor activities, including sports events, were cancelled. The smog became so bad that it began to seep into indoor venues. Movie theaters and concert halls had to cancel shows because of diminished visibility. Finally, after four days of intense smog, a new weather system cleared London's skies on Tuesday, December 9. However, about 4,000 Londoners died from respiratory illnesses shortly thereafter related to breathing the unhealthy coal smoke. Health officials later put the death toll at about 12,000 from the lingering effects of what became known as The Great Smog. In 1956 the British parliament passed the Clean Air Act which mandated pollution controls and restricted furnaces to burning pollution-free fuels. The legislation worked. London has not experienced anything even close to The Great Smog of 1952 in all the years since then.
Tags: London  Great  Smog  pollution 
Added: 4th November 2015
Views: 624
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Party Lines Millennials will have trouble believing these ever existed, but at one time the majority of North American households did not have private telephone lines. Instead, they were serviced by party lines--basically one common telephone line that served numerous households. Party lines existed in urban areas where private lines were unavailable or expensive, but they are more frequently associated with rural areas where great distances separated neighbors and made private lines expensive for phone companies to install. As late as 1943, three-quarters of Pennsylvania's telephone customers had party lines. Party lines had certain advantages: Important community news could be relayed quickly to everyone who was connected, but of course there were major negatives too. Privacy was a virtual impossibility as anyone else who subscribed to the party line could eavesdrop on others' conversations. Also, there was the obvious problem of one subscriber hogging the line, preventing others from making a call. (If you look at Ann Landers-type newspaper columns from the first half of the 20th century, one person dominating the party line was a frequent complaint.) Phone companies responded by offering protocol tips to party-line users. Among the typical suggestions was a five-minute limit per call. Eavesdropping on others' phone conversations did lead to some amusing anecdotes. Criminal schemes were known to have been thwarted by listeners who heard crooks discussing their plans. One college football coach overheard his rival's plans on how to defeat his team in an upcoming game. Most telephone companies discontinued party lines toward the end of the 1970s.
Tags: party  lines  telephone  systems 
Added: 7th November 2016
Views: 376
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

Pages: [1] of 1 | Random