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1901 Exhumation of Abraham Lincoln Here's a weird factoid: Since his assassination in 1865, Abraham Lincoln's remains have been exhumed or disinterred 17 times--and his coffin has been opened five times. Some of the exhumations have been totally understandable. His body was moved in and out of several temporary vaults while awaiting "permanent" burial. One unplanned exhumation happened in 1876. Lincoln's coffin was removed from its marble sarcophagus by a group of grave robbers who were caught almost immediately. Other times the Lincoln Tomb fell into a state of disrepair because the ground in was built upon was too soft. Thus Lincoln's body was removed and shabbily stored in the structure's basement pending the reconstruction work. Each time the coffin itself was actually disturbed, the guardians insisted on opening the casket to ensure Lincoln's remains were actually still inside. The last time this occurred was in 1901 when more renovations were done on Lincoln's deteriorating tomb to make the location more visitor friendly. Lincoln's coffin--which had been encased in a steel cage and buried beneath 10 feet of concrete as a means of discouraging grave robbers--was once more exhumed during the renovations. About 23 workers were on hand to see Lincoln re-interred one last time on September 26, 1901. Out of curiosity they checked the coffin once more to see if Abe was still there. He was. Although his face had turned a chalky white color, the corpse was remarkably well preserved after more than 36 years. Witnesses said that Lincoln's eyebrows were missing and the gloves upon his hands had rotted. Otherwise the face was instantly recognizable to anyone who had ever seen a photo of the famous president. It still bore the famous whiskers, mole, and a full head of wiry hair. The suit Lincoln was buried in--the same one he had worn to his 1865 inauguration--was still intact although it was covered in a fine yellow mold. There were also shreds of a disintegrated American flag upon the corpse. The last living person to have seen Lincoln's corpse was a 14-year-old boy named Fleetwood Lindley. Lindley's father had been one of the construction workers and had urged him to leave school early that day and go to Lincoln's Tomb to see something he would never forget. The boy was also permitted to hold one of the straps that lowered Lincoln's coffin back into its concrete cocoon. Interviewed by the Chicago Tribune about the experience in 1962, Lindley said seeing Lincoln's corpse did not bother him at first, but he said he had trouble sleeping for months afterward. Lindley died in February 1963 at the age of 75 just a few days after giving a final interview on the subject.
Tags: Abraham  Lincoln  exhumation  1901 
Added: 21st July 2015
Views: 2339
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
WML Panel Mourns Dorothy Kilgallen We are approaching the fiftieth anniversary of the odd death of What's My Line? panelist Dorothy Kilgallen. The 52-year-old newspaper reporter and columnist was found dead in her home about 12 hours after she had appeared live on the CBS panel show on the night of Sunday, November 7, 1965. The circumstances surrounding Kilgallen's death are, to say the least, curious. (I made another post on this topic years ago; please check it out!) This clip is the concluding two minutes from the following Sunday's WML episode. Regular panelists Arlene Francis and Bennett Cerf, former panelist Steve Allen, and guest panelist Kitty Carlisle all pay tribute to their late colleague. Note that the men are wearing plain suits instead of their usual tuxedos as a gesture of mourning. It was undoubtedly the saddest episode in the 17-plus years that the original WML aired.
Tags: Dorothy  Kilgallen  death  tribute  eulogies  WML 
Added: 2nd November 2015
Views: 790
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Posted By: Lava1964
Jenny Jones Talk Show Guest Driven to Murder On March 6, 1995, Jenny Jones, the hostess of a TV talk show that bore her name, attempted to shock one her guests. The talk show had debuted in 1991 but had failed to deliver significant ratings until its subject matter became more sleazy starting in 1993. Jones' plan that day was to have a homosexual Michigan man named Scott Amedure admit to having a crush on his neighbor Jonathan Schmitz. Schmitz, a heterosexual, agreed to appear on the program because he had been led to believe that his secret admirer was a female. Unbeknownst to the show's staff, Schmitz had a history of mental illness, so Amedure's revelation weighed negatively on his mind. The media at the time gave a woefully incomplete account of what happened. It portrayed Schmitz as someone who became violent almost immediately. However this clip from the show--which never aired--shows that Schmitz accepted the news as gracefully as could be expected given the circumstances. Only after he received a sexually charged letter from Amedure after taping the show did Schmitz snap. He took some money from his savings account, purchased a shotgun, and fatally wounded Amedure in the latter's mobile home. Schmitz called police shortly thereafter to report what he had done. Schmitz was found guilty of second degree murder and sentenced to between 25 and 50 years in prison. A successful appeal resulted in a retrial--where Schmitz was again found guilty and the prison term was reinstated. Amedure's family won a $25 million lawsuit against The Jenny Jones Show. That decision was later overturned on appeal. The Jenny Jones Show ended in 2003.
Tags: talk  show  Jenny  Jones  murder  gay  crush  Scott  Amedure 
Added: 5th November 2015
Views: 720
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Posted By: Lava1964
Henry Ford Invents Charcoal Most people realize that Henry Ford was responsible for the assembly line--a groundbreaking factory innovation that made the manufacturing of automobiles (and everything else) go much faster. Few people, however, know that Ford also invented modern charcoal briquets! Amazingly, Ford's auto assembly line led to the development of the blackened fuel chunks. Here's what happened: One day in the 1920s Ford visited his Dearborn automobile plant and was aghast at the amount of wood that was wasted in the manufacture of his Model T cars. Ford found all types of waste to be unacceptable, so he wanted the wood bits left over from his cars' wheels and interiors to be put to a good and profitable use. He figured that since wood chips were highly flammable, they could be used as a handy portable fuel source. He consulted with some chemists and came up with the idea of charcoal pieces suitable for barbecues. Furthermore, they fit in nicely with promotional literature of the era that encouraged American consumers to buy Ford automobiles for peaceful, long drives in the country. What better way to cap off a serene weekend drive than to have a cookout using Ford's charcoal? This photo shows a package of 1920s briquets bearing the familiar Ford logo.
Tags: Henry  Ford  charcoal  inventor 
Added: 11th February 2016
Views: 916
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Posted By: Lava1964
First Name of Lt Columbo During the long run that Peter Falk's beloved Columbo detective mysteries had on both NBC and ABC, Lt. Columbo's name was supposedly never revealed. In one episode, Columbo is asked if he has a first name. The detective coyly replied, "Only my wife uses it." However, Columbo's name was revealed in two NBC episodes via quick glances at his LAPD ID. In both Dead Weight and A Matter of Honor, Columbo's ID is shown onscreen just long enough for eagle-eyed viewers to see that it his first name is Frank. However, many trivia buffs wrongly believe Columbo's first name was Phillip. Why? Despite having zero evidence to back up his assertion, Fred L. Worth, the author of a trivia book, wrote that Columbo's first name was Phillip. This factoid was seized upon by the creators of Trivia Pursuit--and it appeared as a question in the first edition of the game. Worth attempted to sue the Trivial Pursuit people for copyright violation, but facts--even bogus ones--are not protected by copyright.
Tags: Columbo  first  name  Frank 
Added: 25th November 2017
Views: 476
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Posted By: Lava1964

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