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Stix Baer and Fuller at River Roads Former Stix, Baer and Fuller at River Roads Mall - Jennings, Missouri, 1983
Tags: River  Roads  Mall  Jennings  Missouri  1983  Stix  Baer  Fuller  Department  Store 
Added: 10th February 2015
Views: 773
Rating:
Posted By: poundsdwayne47
Stix Baer and Fuller at River Roads Former Stix, Baer and Fuller Department Store at River Roads Mall - Jennings, Missouri, 1961
Tags: Jennings  Missouri  1961  River  Roads  Mall  Stix  Baer  Fuller  Department  Store 
Added: 10th February 2015
Views: 1391
Rating:
Posted By: poundsdwayne47
Elusive Andy Griffith Show Character - Mr. Schwump The Andy Griffith Show has some of the most fanatically devoted watchers of any sitcom in history. Despite their zeal, no one has been able to positively identify the actor who played 'Mr. Schwump' in at least 26 episodes from 1964 through 1968. Actually, fans of the show can't even agree on the character's name. The late Everett Greenbaum, who wrote many of the scripts, claimed the character was actually written as 'Mr. Schwamp,' but it seemed to be pronounced as 'Schwump' whenever he was acknowledged. Whatever the case, Mr. Schwump was the classic background character: He can be seen in crowd shots at Mayberry's social gatherings, at public meetings, at private parties, at church services, sitting on a public bench, as a customer in stores, etc. He never once uttered a single line in any episode nor was he given any screen credit. He is only noteworthy at all because in several episodes Andy Taylor passes by him and says, "Hello, Mr. Schwump." It is generally acknowledged that he appears to be about 60 years old and wears a hairpiece. Efforts by zealous fans to find out who the actor was have proven fruitless. On April 1, 2012 an elaborate post was made on the Facebook page of The Andy Griffith Show Rerun Watchers Club declaring that researchers had determined Mr. Schwump was an actor named Patch S. Wimmers originally from Camp Threw, MS. Although it was supposed to be an obvious April Fools Day prank, many die-hard fans did not realize the information was bogus and still accept the Patch S. Wimmers story as gospel. None of the surviving cast members ever remembers learning Mr. Schwump's real name. One theory claims the mysterious actor was a friend of Andy Griffith and his occasional appearances in the show were an inside joke. Mr. Schwump's true identity remains unknown.
Tags: Mr  Schwump  Andy  Griffith  Show  sitcom 
Added: 4th March 2015
Views: 5595
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
The Movie Big Piano Scene at FAO Schwarz I'm sure we all thought of this scene when we heard FAO Schwarz preparing to close their New York City store at Fifth Avenue.
Tags: The  Movie  Big  Piano  Scene  at  FAO  Schwarz  New  York  City  store  at  Fifth  Avenue  Tom  Hanks  Elizabeth  Perkins  Robert  Loggia  John  Heard  Penny  Marshall  foot-operated  electronic  keyboard,  performing  Heart  and  Soul  and  "Chopsticks 
Added: 16th May 2015
Views: 994
Rating:
Posted By: Freckles
Paper MLB All-Star Ballots Billed as 'the largest non-political election in the world,' from 1970 to 2014, Major League Baseball allowed fans to determine the starters for the annual All-Star Game using punch-out ballots. (The wisdom of such a system is certainly debatable.) Shown here is the 1977 All-Star ballot. During those 45 seasons paper ballots and ballot boxes were available at all MLB and minor league ballparks, at the National Baseball Hall of Fame, and often at stores that carried official MLB-endorsed products. There was also a mail-in provision. In March 2015, however, MLB announced the discontinuation of paper ballots. This did not mean that fans could no longer vote; they just had to do it online. In 2015 MLB cited stats that showed far more fans were voting online than by paper ballot since the internet option became available.
Tags: MLB  All-Star  ballot  paper 
Added: 23rd June 2015
Views: 860
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
1901 Exhumation of Abraham Lincoln Here's a weird factoid: Since his assassination in 1865, Abraham Lincoln's remains have been exhumed or disinterred 17 times--and his coffin has been opened five times. Some of the exhumations have been totally understandable. His body was moved in and out of several temporary vaults while awaiting "permanent" burial. One unplanned exhumation happened in 1876. Lincoln's coffin was removed from its marble sarcophagus by a group of grave robbers who were caught almost immediately. Other times the Lincoln Tomb fell into a state of disrepair because the ground in was built upon was too soft. Thus Lincoln's body was removed and shabbily stored in the structure's basement pending the reconstruction work. Each time the coffin itself was actually disturbed, the guardians insisted on opening the casket to ensure Lincoln's remains were actually still inside. The last time this occurred was in 1901 when more renovations were done on Lincoln's deteriorating tomb to make the location more visitor friendly. Lincoln's coffin--which had been encased in a steel cage and buried beneath 10 feet of concrete as a means of discouraging grave robbers--was once more exhumed during the renovations. About 23 workers were on hand to see Lincoln re-interred one last time on September 26, 1901. Out of curiosity they checked the coffin once more to see if Abe was still there. He was. Although his face had turned a chalky white color, the corpse was remarkably well preserved after more than 36 years. Witnesses said that Lincoln's eyebrows were missing and the gloves upon his hands had rotted. Otherwise the face was instantly recognizable to anyone who had ever seen a photo of the famous president. It still bore the famous whiskers, mole, and a full head of wiry hair. The suit Lincoln was buried in--the same one he had worn to his 1865 inauguration--was still intact although it was covered in a fine yellow mold. There were also shreds of a disintegrated American flag upon the corpse. The last living person to have seen Lincoln's corpse was a 14-year-old boy named Fleetwood Lindley. Lindley's father had been one of the construction workers and had urged him to leave school early that day and go to Lincoln's Tomb to see something he would never forget. The boy was also permitted to hold one of the straps that lowered Lincoln's coffin back into its concrete cocoon. Interviewed by the Chicago Tribune about the experience in 1962, Lindley said seeing Lincoln's corpse did not bother him at first, but he said he had trouble sleeping for months afterward. Lindley died in February 1963 at the age of 75 just a few days after giving a final interview on the subject.
Tags: Abraham  Lincoln  exhumation  1901 
Added: 21st July 2015
Views: 2812
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Subeam Bread They still make it but I haven't seen it in the stores in a long time.
Tags: Little  Miss  Sunbeam  Subeam  Bread   
Added: 28th September 2015
Views: 696
Rating:
Posted By: Freckles
Bordens Milk Tags: Bordens  Milk  store  bought  milk  glass  container 
Added: 18th December 2015
Views: 761
Rating:
Posted By: Freckles
7-11 Leave The Kids In The Car Ad Campaign Tags: 7-11  Leave  The  Kids  In  The  Car  Ad  Campaign  convenience  store 
Added: 21st January 2016
Views: 1423
Rating:
Posted By: Cathy
Black Tom Explosion 1916 Even though the United States was neutral nation in 1916, it was still occasionally affected by acts of war. The most notable to happen on land was the Black Tom explosion on July 30, 1916, in Jersey City, NJ. It was an act of sabotage by German agents to destroy American-made munitions that were to be supplied to the Allies in the First World War. Black Tom was originally a man-made island constructed around a large black rock in New York Harbor that was a well-known hazard to naval navigation. It was eventually connected by the Lehigh Valley Railroad to the mainland and was absorbed into Jersey City. It became a major munitions depot even before the war. Shortly after midnight on July 30, 1916, a series of small fires was discovered on the pier. Some guards tried to fight the fires while others fled, fearing an explosion. They had good reason to fear such a calamity as 2 million pounds of explosives and small arms were stored on Black Tom Island awaiting shipment to Czarist Russia. The feared explosion came; actually there were several explosions. The first and biggest occurred at 2:08 a.m. It had the force of an earthquake measuring 5.5 on the Richter scale. Flying fragments caused more than $100,000 in damages to the Statue of Liberty on its gown and torch. (To date, the torch has never been reopened to the public.) Windows 25 miles were shattered and the explosion was felt as far away as Philadelphia. Four people were definitely killed by the blast--including an infant. Some sources claim the fatality total was seven. Blame originally was directed at Black Tom Island watchmen who had lit small smudge-pot fires to drive away mosquitoes, but they were quickly absolved of blame when the true nature of the fires showed obvious evidence of arson. German saboteurs were blamed for the incident which caused $20 million in damages. The Leigh Valley Railroad successfully sued the German government after the war but had no success in collecting any compensation until 1953 when the West German government agreed to pay $95 million. The final payment was made in 1979.
Tags: Black  Tom  Explosion  1916  German  sabotage 
Added: 13th January 2018
Views: 864
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

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