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Last of the Secret Agents 1966 Original theatrical trailer. Marty Allen and Steve Rossi, two American tourists in France, are given a multipurpose umbrella and pitted against an international band of art thieves. Among the stolen treasures is the Statue Of Liberty. Nancy Sinatra plays Steve's girl and she sings the title song. Supporting cast includes John Williams, Lou Jacobi, Sig Ruman, Harvey Korman, Edy Williams and Ed Sullivan. Terrible Allen and Rossi film, great Nancy Sinatra theme song! This film appeared on AMC, years ago. Like their unaired, unsold 1965 TV pilot "HELLO DERE!", this didn't do much for Allen & Rossi's career....
Tags: last  of  the  secret  agents  marty  allen  steve  rossi 
Added: 18th November 2007
Views: 1852
Rating:
Posted By: Babs64
The Statue . . burglary, grand larceny, possession of stolen goods and murder! . . .today's your lucky day, Junior. . i'm gonna let you off with just a warning!!
Tags: comedy  Seinfeld  Kramer  Michael  Richards 
Added: 9th December 2007
Views: 1176
Rating:
Posted By: Teresa
1931 World Series Program This attractive baseball program is from the 1931 World Series. That Fall Classic was a rematch of the 1930 World Series. It pitted the Philadelphia Athletics versus the St. Louis Cardinals. The A's had won the World Series in 1929 and 1930, but the Cards took the '31 tilt in seven games. According to the hand-written notation, this program is from Game Five which was played on October 7 at Philadelphia's Shibe Park. The Cardinals only had one major lineup change from 1930: a 27-year-old rookie outfielder named Pepper Martin. Had there been a World Series MVP award in 1931, Martin would have won it. He led the Cards in several offensive categories--including stolen bases. Martin also made a crucial running catch to snuff out a ninth-inning Philadelphia rally in Game Seven. This was the last World Series appearance by the Philadelphia A's. The next time the Athletics appeared in a World Series was in 1972 when they were the Oakland A's.
Tags: 1931  World  Series  program  baseball 
Added: 25th November 2009
Views: 1770
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Mona Lisa Stolen 1911 This is what remained of the Mona Lisa in The Louvre after it was stolen on August 21, 1911--four metal hooks on a wall. The famous painting was missing until December 1913 when an Italian, Vincenzo Peruggia, tried to sell it to a museum in his own country. Peruggia was portrayed as a patriotic Italian who wanted to return the Mona Lisa to his homeland. However, the real story of the painting's theft did not come out for years. Peruggia actually stole the Mona Lisa for an Argentine art forger who had already made six passable copies of it. When the theft became public news, the forger had no use for the real painting. Instead he sold the six copies to six different gullible art fans for extraordinary sums, each buyer believing he had bought the true Da Vinci masterpiece. During the 27 months the painting was missing, Peruggia had kept it in a trunk under his bed in his apartment not far from The Louvre. He was waiting for instructions from the art forger that never came. Eventually Peruggia tried to sell the original painting himself and was promptly arrested.
Tags: Mona  Lisa  theft   
Added: 1st March 2009
Views: 2022
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Posted By: Lava1964
Werner Klemperer Interview Werner Klemperer (Colonel Klink from Hogan's Heroes) is interviewed by Pat Sajak on the latter's short-lived talk show. Pat replaces Werner's beloved souvenir monocle which had recently been stolen. Aw!
Tags: Werner  Klemperer  Pat  Sajak 
Added: 4th March 2008
Views: 2213
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Marion Parker Murder - 1927 Fair warning: This story is unsettling. One of the most brutal crimes in American history was the kidnapping and murder of 12-year-old schoolgirl Marion Parker. On Thursday, December 15, 1927 a young man appeared at Mount Vernon Junior High School in Los Angeles claiming to be an associate of Perry Parker, a prominent local banker. The man coolly told the school's registrar that the banker had been seriously injured in a car accident and had requested to speak to his daughter. There were actually twin Parker sisters enrolled in the school--Marion and Marjorie. By chance the registrar fetched Marion who rode off with the man. He was later identified as 19-year-old William Edward Hickman. The Parker family became alarmed when Marion did not return from school. Shortly thereafter they received a ransom note and phone calls from the kidnapper asking for $1500 in gold certificates in exchange for Marion's safe return. One attempt by Marion's father to pay the ransom was thwarted when Hickman spotted police detectives lurking nearby. Another meeting time was secretly arranged by Hickman and Marion's father on December 17 where the money was given to a man in a parked car. Perry Parker saw his daughter wrapped in a blanket slumped in the back seat with her eyes open. At gunpoint the ransom was paid and the driver pushed the girl onto the street and drove away. Marion's father was horrified to find that his daughter was dead. Her eyelids had been sewn open to give the illusion that she was alive. Worse, her head had been severed, her arms and legs had been cut off and she had been disemboweled. (The missing limbs were found the next day in a city park.) The ghastly crime spawned the largest manhunt in southern California's history, one that included 20,000 volunteers. A reward of $100,000 was offered for the capture of the culprit. Several clues, including the discovery of the stolen car used on the night of the money exchange, led to Hickman being named as the key suspect. He was eventually arrested in Echo, OR after spending some of the gold certificates there. Hickman had been a former employee at Parker's bank and had been fired for embezzlement in a forged check scam. He served prison time for the crime. The fingerprint records from the embezzlement charge were used to match those found on the stolen car from the kidnapping. Hickman willingly told police in graphic detail that he had decided to kill Marion because she had discovered his name. She had only been dead about 12 hours before the money exchange. Hickman said he had choked her with a towel to make her unconscious and then began his dismemberment while she was still alive. Hickman--who said he intended to use the $1500 to pay his tuition to attend a bible college!--hoped to avoid the gallows by claiming insanity. He was one of the first defendants in California to try that ploy after it had become an acceptable legal defense. It failed when a fellow prisoner claimed Hickman had asked his advice on how to appear crazy. A jury rejected Hickman's insanity defense in February 1928. Hickman was executed at San Quentin Prison eight months later on October 19. His hand-written confession is on display at the Los Angeles Police Museum. Marion Parker's ghost is said to occupy her former house.
Tags: Marion  Parker  murder  kidnapping  1927 
Added: 13th April 2015
Views: 957
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Dog Finds Stolen World Cup Trophy - 1966 In 1966 England hosted the quadrennial World Cup soccer finals. On March 20, a few months before the tournament began, the Jules Rimet Trophy (a.k.a. the World Cup) was stolen while being exhibited at Westminster Central Hall. Interestingly, the culprits ignored a priceless array of rare stamps to steal the far-less-valuable trophy. Police quickly received a 15,000 ransom demand. However, when they arrested the culprit, he turned out to be a hoaxer. The trophy was, however, found just seven days later wrapped in newspaper at the bottom of a suburban garden hedge in South London. The finder was a collie dog named Pickles who sniffed out the World Cup while taking a walk with his owner David Corbett. When England won the trophy, Pickles was invited to the celebration banquet and was allowed to lick his owner's bowl. His owner collected a 6,000 reward. The thief was never caught.
Tags: dog  World  Cup  soccer  Pickles 
Added: 1st September 2011
Views: 1477
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Disco Demolition Night - 1979 Disco Demolition Night--one of baseball's most ill-conceived promotions--caused a rare MLB forfeit on July 12, 1979. It occurred at Chicago's Comiskey Park between games of a Thursday doubleheader between the hometown White Sox and visiting Detroit Tigers. Popular Chicago disc jockey Steve Dahl had been fired from radio station WDAI when he mentioned--on the air--that he listened to the album-oriented rock of rival station WLUP rather than his own station's fare--predominantly disco tunes. Dahl was subsequently hired by WLUP, known locally as "The Loop." The 1979 White Sox were a mediocre team struggling to attract decent crowds, so the team's management was willing to try anything to try to draw new fans. Dahl, in conjunction with Mike Veeck (son of then-White Sox owner Bill Veeck), devised a promotion: Anyone who brought a disco record to the ballpark would be admitted for just 98 cents. The records would be collected, placed in a large crate in center field, and blown up by Dahl between games. Dahl hyped the event on The Loop, hoping that 12,000 people might show up--double the typical Thursday attendance at Comiskey Park. The turnout exceeded all expectations. An estimated 90,000 people turned up at the 52,000-seat stadium. When the box office stopped selling tickets, thousands of people still got in by climbing over walls. It was an atypical baseball crowd to be sure. Broadcasters Harry Caray and Jimmy Piersall commented on the "strange people" wandering throughout the stands. When the crate was filled with records, stadium staff stopped collecting them. The "fans" who still had records soon realized they were shaped like frisbees. A few began to throw records from the stands during the game. After the first game, a 4-1 Tigers' win, Dahl, clad in army fatigues and a helmet, proceeded to center field. The crate containing the records was rigged with explosives. Dahl led the crowd in chants of "Disco sucks!" prior to triggering the explosion. When detonated, the explosives tore a hole in the outfield grass and a small fire began burning. Dahl triumphantly circled the warning track in a jeep before leaving the field. Once Dahl left, the White Sox started warming up for the second game, but thousands of fans rushed the field. Some lit more fires. Others pulled down the batting cage and wrecked it. Bases were stolen and chunks of the outfield grass were ripped away. Most trespassers wandered around aimlessly, though a number of participants burned banners, sat on the grass, ran from security and police and threw records into the air. Veeck and Caray used the PA system to implore the fans to vacate the field, but to no avail. Eventually the field was cleared by police in riot gear. Six people reported minor injuries and 39 were arrested for disorderly conduct. The field was so badly torn up that the umpires decided the second game could not be played. The next day American League president Lee MacPhail forfeited the second game to the Tigers on the grounds that the White Sox had not provided acceptable playing conditions. For the rest of the season, fielders complained about Comiskey Park's playing surface being substandard. No AL game has been forfeited since that night.
Tags: baseball  riot  disco  Comiskey  Park 
Added: 30th January 2012
Views: 4785
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Aberfan Disaster - 1966 At 9.15 am on Friday, October 21, 1966 a enormous mountain of excavated coal mining debris (known to coal miners as a waste tip) slid down a mountainside into the mining village of Aberfan, near Merthyr Tydfil in South Wales. The waste tips, which had been building up for 50 years, had become heavy and saturated due to a week of rainy weather. The debris slide first destroyed a farm cottage in its path, killing all the occupants. At Pantglas Junior School, just below, the children had just returned to their classes after singing All Things Bright and Beautiful at their assembly. The tipping gang up the mountain had seen the slide start, but could not raise the alarm because their telephone cable had been repeatedly stolen. (The Tribunal of Inquiry later established that the disaster happened so quickly that a telephone warning would not have saved any lives regardless.) Down in the village, nobody saw anything, but everybody heard the noise as about 40,000 cubic metres of debris crashed into the school at a depth of 39 feet. Gaynor Minett, an eight-year-old student, remembered four years later, "It was a tremendous rumbling sound and all the school went dead. You could hear a pin drop. Everyone just froze in their seats. I just managed to get up and I reached the end of my desk when the sound got louder and nearer, until I could see the black out of the window. I can't remember any more but I woke up to find that a horrible nightmare had just begun in front of my eyes." The slide engulfed the school and about 20 houses in the village before coming to rest. Then there was total silence. George Williams, who was trapped in the wreckage, remembered that "In that silence you couldn't hear a bird or a child." All able-bodied persons in the village rushed to the scene with whatever implements they could find to begin digging through the mess to search for survivors. None were found after 11 a.m., but it took nearly a week to recover all the bodies. The death toll in the Aberfan disaster was 144--of which 116 were school children. That accounted for about half the school's enrolment. Five teachers were killed too. An inquiry later blamed the National Coal Board (NCB) for ignoring warnings from years earlier about the potential hazards of the growing waste tips. Families of the victims were eventually compensated 500 British pounds by the NCB for each loved one who had perished.
Tags: Aberfan  Wales  disaster  coal 
Added: 11th June 2012
Views: 2174
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
George Davis - Vanishing Baseball Superstar George Stacey Davis was one of the finest shortstops in Major League Baseball history. He enjoyed a 20-year MLB career from 1890 through 1909. Blessed with a strong arm and an excellent batting eye, Davis was a perennial star for the New York Giants during the late 19th and early 20th century. A switch-hitter, Davis compiled 2,688 career hits and 615 stolen bases. He still holds the Giants' club record for the longest hitting streak (36 games). So valuable was Davis to the Giants that he became one of the controversial figures in the war between the National and American Leagues when he jumped to the Chicago White Stockings of the AL in 1902. Once Davis' playing career ended, he coached Amherst College's baseball team, managed a bowling alley, and sold automobiles for a time. Then he vanished. For decades many noteworthy baseball historians rated Davis as the best player not in the Hall of Fame--and no one seemed to know what had happened to him. In 1968, Lee Allen, the historian at the National Baseball Hall of Fame, wrote an article for The Sporting News in which he asked for any information about Davis' later years and death. A woman claiming to be Davis' niece replied. She put Allen in touch with Davis' estranged sister who suggested Allen should check the records of state hospitals in Pennsylvania. Allen eventually found Davis' death certificate. He had died in a Philadelphia mental institution in 1940 at the age of 70. He had lived there for six years, suffering from the effects of syphilis. Records showed his wife paid $41 to have him quickly interred in a pauper's grave. In 1998 Davis was posthumously inducted into the Hall of Fame by the Veterans' Committee. For the only time in the Hall of Fame's history, no living relative could be found to accept a deceased inductee's plaque at the induction ceremony, although 50 fans from Davis' hometown of Cohoes, NY were present. The purchase of a handsome headstone for Davis' previously unmarked grave was financed by the Society for American Baseball Research shortly after Davis was enshrined in Cooperstown.
Tags: baseball  George  Davis  vanished  syphilis  Hall  of  Fame 
Added: 31st December 2015
Views: 392
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

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