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2002 MLB All-Star Game Controversial Tie While the other three major North American team sports' All-Star Games have become farces, baseball's mid-summer classic still retains its luster for being competitive and hard-fought, and unchanged in its format since it was first played in 1933. Since day one it's always been the American League versus the National League. At the 2002 ASG in Milwaukee, however, the game suffered a huge public-relations blow because it was stopped after 11 innings deadlocked at 7-7, when both teams ran out of pitchers. This development was the result of a change in ASG philosophy that strongly encouraged managers to use everyone on the bench. The days of Willie Mays playing in the ASG from start to finish (which he did 11 times) were gone. Instead, managers liberally moved players in and out of the lineup so that it resembled something akin to a softball game at a church picnic where, to avoid hurt feelings, everyone participates. Commissioner Bud Selig made the decision to halt the game in consultation with the umpiring crew and both managers. The crowd of more than 41,000 spectators was outraged that the game ended without a winner. Furthermore, no MVP was selected because of the inconclusive outcome--a strange decision did not make a lot of sense. The following year, as a way to make the contest more meaningful, it was decided that whichever league won the ASG would get home field advantage for the World Series that autumn. That policy, which had its supporters and detractors, was kept until 2016.
Tags: MLB  baseball  2002  All-Star  Game  tie 
Added: 12th July 2017
Views: 311
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Posted By: Lava1964
Stanford Indians From 1930 to 1972 Stanford University's varsity sports teams were known as the Indians. (At the 1971 Rose Bowl game, the cheerleaders were dressed in native costumes for the band's halftime show.) However, pressure by native American groups, who claimed the nickname was demeaning and insensitive to their heritage, caused the University to change it to Cardinals in 1975. (The new name had nothing to do with the bird, but rather the cardinal red color of the uniforms.) The move was quite controversial. For the first few years there was annual pressure to reinstate the Indians name and logo. However, in 1975 Stanford's board of governors declared the disavowal of the Indians nickname to be irrevocable. The singular Cardinal nickname was officially adopted in 1990. Still there are some old fans and alumni who pine for the return of the Indian logo and name.
Tags: Stanford  Indians  nickname 
Added: 2nd December 2017
Views: 221
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Posted By: Lava1964
1966 Notre Dame-MSU 10-10 Tie This is a highlight clip of one of the most eagerly anticipated NCAA football games of all time. It occurred late in the 1966 season on November 19 when the undefeated Fighting Irish of Notre Dame traveled to East Lansing, MI to play the undefeated Michigan State Spartans. The attendance at Spartan Stadium was officially listed as 80,011, but it was likely higher. The well played game finished inconclusively in a 10-10 tie. The game ended somewhat controversially. Notre Dame had the ball at is own 30-yard line with 1:24 to play. They converted a fourth-and-one for a first down but then the Irish conservatively ran out to clock on two plays to preserve the tie. The tie ended Michigan State's 1966 schedule, but Notre Dame still had one more game on its slate--a road game the following Saturday at the Los Angeles Coliseum versus Southern California. Notre Dame easily rolled to a 51-0 win over the Trojans and won the 1966 national championship.
Tags: 1966  NCAA  football  Notre  Dame  Michigan  State  10-10  tie 
Added: 10th December 2017
Views: 335
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Posted By: Lava1964
Black Tom Explosion 1916 Even though the United States was neutral nation in 1916, it was still occasionally affected by acts of war. The most notable to happen on land was the Black Tom explosion on July 30, 1916, in Jersey City, NJ. It was an act of sabotage by German agents to destroy American-made munitions that were to be supplied to the Allies in the First World War. Black Tom was originally a man-made island constructed around a large black rock in New York Harbor that was a well-known hazard to naval navigation. It was eventually connected by the Lehigh Valley Railroad to the mainland and was absorbed into Jersey City. It became a major munitions depot even before the war. Shortly after midnight on July 30, 1916, a series of small fires was discovered on the pier. Some guards tried to fight the fires while others fled, fearing an explosion. They had good reason to fear such a calamity as 2 million pounds of explosives and small arms were stored on Black Tom Island awaiting shipment to Czarist Russia. The feared explosion came; actually there were several explosions. The first and biggest occurred at 2:08 a.m. It had the force of an earthquake measuring 5.5 on the Richter scale. Flying fragments caused more than $100,000 in damages to the Statue of Liberty on its gown and torch. (To date, the torch has never been reopened to the public.) Windows 25 miles were shattered and the explosion was felt as far away as Philadelphia. Four people were definitely killed by the blast--including an infant. Some sources claim the fatality total was seven. Blame originally was directed at Black Tom Island watchmen who had lit small smudge-pot fires to drive away mosquitoes, but they were quickly absolved of blame when the true nature of the fires showed obvious evidence of arson. German saboteurs were blamed for the incident which caused $20 million in damages. The Leigh Valley Railroad successfully sued the German government after the war but had no success in collecting any compensation until 1953 when the West German government agreed to pay $95 million. The final payment was made in 1979.
Tags: Black  Tom  Explosion  1916  German  sabotage 
Added: 13th January 2018
Views: 424
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Posted By: Lava1964
Jack Dempsey on WML 1965 I posted this clip years ago, but its source is no longer available--so here it is again: From July 1965, former world heavyweight champion Jack Dempsey is the mystery guest on What's My Line? He had recently turned 70 years old--and still looked like he could fight his way out of any trouble. In fact, he would. At about this time two punks tried to mug the grand old champ near his Broadway restaurant. Dempsey flattened them both.
Tags: Jack  Dempsey  Whats  My  Line 
Added: 12th July 2018
Views: 24
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Posted By: Lava1964
my old Father this is a 1919, comic strip re-print book. .i had NO IDEA it had been around this long: "Bringing Up Father" was a comic strip created by George McManus that ran from January 12, 1913 to May 28, 2000. Most readers, however, called it Maggie and Jiggs, after its two main characters. The strip was about an Irishman named Jiggs living in the United States who comes into wealth but still wants to keep his old pals, eat corned beef and cabbage (sometimes called Jiggs dinner), and hang out at the tavern, much to the consternation of his wife, Maggie, a social climber.
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Added: 28th May 2018
Views: 100
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Posted By: hieund

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