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Featured Member- jedwgrn aka Jack My name is Jack and this trek of mine began in Dallas in '49. Raised in Irving, TX, I am one of seven kids which made for a crowd in a small house and you had to not be the last to the table during chow time. Now, I am the father of four and the grandfather of nine and I am proud of everyone of them. Just ask me, I have pictures. My family was and is the primary focus for most of my life and kids in sports and other activities claimed most of my free time. These are the days I thought I would have more time for myself, not so. I seem to be busier now than ever. April marks my 40th anniversary with the US Army in one capacity or another. Talk about being a lifer. In April of '69 I was drafted into the Army in Dallas, spent two years in (infantry and Vietnam) and then got out. The next two years I went to school while a reserve member and then returned to active duty in 1973. My military retirement was effective July of 1992. I retired as a Master Sergeant after serving as a First Sergeant for seven years. Immediately thereafter I returned to service in a civilian capacity, which is where I remain. Today it still is all about soldiers. I work and teach in a dental prosthetics laboratory for an Army residency program that has Army and Navy dentists to include two Canadian officers as residents. I have a job that I really like what I do. So, as I have always asked myself, 'Where to from here?' Haven't got a clue - perhaps this is the last stop, God willing.
Tags: Featured  Member-  jedwgrn  aka  Jack  Nice  Guy 
Added: 9th March 2009
Views: 1577
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Posted By: Steve
Remco Toys Monkey Division Whirlybird 1964 A mint in the box Remco Whirlybird. Remco made many variations of this whirlybird. This is the Monkey Division variation. Monkey Division was a line of toys Remco made and touted it as their "Guerilla War" line of toys. The had helmets, guns, rifles, bazookas, etc. Another wildly popular 60s toy put out during the Vietnam era. Toys glorifying war began to wane when the reports of scores of soliders getting killed filled our TV screens and the "Living Room War" we viewed on the news became unpopular, also it was more fun to make Love not War and the hippie era was ushered in. Parents began to object to toys glorifying war. The set also came with 25 soldiers, a tank, a jeep and truck. The whirlybird also carried all the stuff and had a working cargo hoist too. You are looking at a rarity. The soliders etc. are not shown but are still in their original package. I've often wondered how some of these toys these toys remain unplayed with? Perhaps it is old store stock and I've also heard that sometimes parents would leave the room of a deceased child the way it was when they passed. That is kind of creepy to me.
Tags: remco  whirlybird  helicopter  toys  classic 
Added: 14th August 2007
Views: 6360
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Posted By: dezurtdude
Willie and Joe Perhaps some of you may remember "Willie and Joe." The two World War II infantry grunts created by Bill Mauldin. His famous infantrymen cartoons were featured in "Stars and Stripes," the American soldier's newspaper. The cartoons would depict life as the average American soldier would live it during wartime. Some were comical, others brought home the ugliness and tragedies of war. He didn't get along very well with most officers because would poke fun at them in his cartoons. This would irritate the younger officers and some older ones alike. Gen. George Patton wanted him to stop drawing his cartoons but apparently the morale of the American soldier and the popularity of the cartoons and the good effect that "Willie and Joe" had on it won out even over the General's wishes. These two cartoons came from the first collection of his work compiled in a book alled, "Up Front," which was a best-seller. At age 23 he won the Pulitzer Prize. That was in 1945. He was assigned to the 45th infantry division, and was wounded by a shell fragment in Anzio for which he receive the Purple Heart. He also made the cover of Time Magazine in 1958. Bill passed away in 2003 at the age of 81. Bill Mauldin was a great American!
Tags: willie  joe  wwii  bill  mauldin  stars  strpes  cartoons 
Added: 17th September 2007
Views: 2393
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Posted By: jimmyjet
FOX News Insults Canadian Military I generally don't post recent clips, but this one needs to be shown. A panel of buffoons on the FOX News 'Redeye' show recently belittled the Canadian military at about the same time four Canadian soldiers were killed in Afghanistan in a roadside ambush. Among the classless things said about the Canadian Armed Forces was a bizarre accusation that they want to take a break from their duties to have 'yoga classes, paint landscapes and wear Capri pants on the beach.' Canadians are more than a little bit miffed by these ignorami. To date 116 Canadians have been killed in the mission in Afghanistan. Here's the story from CBC News.
Tags: FOX  News  Redeye  Canada  military 
Added: 26th March 2009
Views: 1059
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Posted By: Lava1964
WW II Hero Tony Stein Tony Stein was born in Dayton, Ohio. He enlisted in the United States Marine Corps on 22 Sep 1942. At Iwo Jima, manned with a light machine gun that he had previously taken from an aircraft, he fired while standing upright amidst heavy enemy fire to provide his fellow Marines time to get into position. He then charged nearby Japanese pillboxes alone, killing about 20 Japanese soldiers in close range. He ran out of ammunition eight times; each time, he ran back to the beach with a wounded Marine on his shoulders, resupplied himself, and ran right back into combat. On 1 Mar 1945, he was killed in action. He was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor and now rests in peace at Calvary Cemetery in Dayton, Ohio.
Tags: WW  II  Hero  Tony  Stein 
Added: 24th March 2009
Views: 1534
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Posted By: Old Fart
Love Me when Im Gone 3 Doors Down Dedicated to all the Troops, Soldiers Past and Present who lost there Lives for our freedom!! God Bless us all!
Tags: Yup 
Added: 24th October 2007
Views: 1506
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Posted By: Marty6697
American Soldier Toby Keith
Tags: Remember  our  Vets  11  Nov    Veterans  Day 
Added: 25th October 2007
Views: 1241
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Posted By: Marty6697
1974 - Japanese WWII Soldier Finally Surrenders Hiroo Onoda, a Japanese soldier, refused to believe the Second World War had ended--and continued his mission of clandestine sabotage for twenty-nine years. On December 26, 1944, Onoda was sent to Lubang Island in the Philippines. His orders were to hamper enemy activity on the island, including destroying the airstrip and the pier at the harbor. Onoda's orders also stated that under no circumstances was he to surrender or take his own life. When he landed on the island, Onoda joined forces with other Japanese soldiers. The officers in the group all outranked Onoda, which prevented him from carrying out his assignment. United States and Filipino forces retook Luband Island when they landed on February 28, 1945. Within a short time, all but Onoda and three other soldiers had either died or surrendered. Onoda, who had been promoted to lieutenant, ordered the men to take to the hills. Onoda continued his campaign as a Japanese holdout, initially living in the mountains with three fellow soldiers (Akatsu, Shimada and Kozuka). Although hostilities ceased in August 1945, Onoda and his comrades were oblivious to Japan's unconditional surrender. Thus the foursome carried out guerrilla activities, killed some 30 Filipino citizens, and engaged in several shootouts with the police for years. As early as 1945 Onoda saw a leaflet saying the war had ended, but he and his comrades thought it was enemy propaganda. They continued their bloody raids against local farmers and police. Even leaflets from General Tomoyuki Yamashita of the Fourteenth Area Army failed to convince the maverick soldiers to capitulate. One of the four, Yuichi Akatsu, walked away from the others in September 1949 and surrendered to Filipino forces in 1950 after six months on his own. In 1952 letters and family pictures were dropped from aircraft urging the remaining three to surrender, but they concluded it too was a ruse. Shimada was shot in the leg during a gun battle with local fishermen in June 1953. Onoda nursed him back to health. On May 7, 1954, Shimada was killed by a shot fired by a search party. Kozuka was killed by two shots fired by local police on October 19, 1972, leaving Onoda alone. He and Onoda were burning local farmers' rice harvest as part of their guerrilla activities. On February 20, 1974, Onoda met a young Japanese man, Norio Suzuki, who was on a personal quest to find him. Onoda described this moment in a 2010 interview: "This hippie boy Suzuki came to the island to listen to the feelings of a Japanese soldier. Suzuki asked me why I would not come out..." Onoda and Suzuki became friends, but Onoda still refused to surrender, saying that he was waiting for orders from a superior officer. Suzuki returned to Japan with photographs of himself and Onoda as proof of their encounter. The Japanese government located Onoda's commanding officer, Major Yoshimi Taniguchi, who had become a bookseller in civilian life. On March 9, 1974, Taniguchi met with Onoda and persuaded him to surrender. Onoda turned over his sword, his rifle (still in working order), 500 rounds of ammunition, and several hand grenades, as well as a dagger his mother had given him in 1944. Though he had killed numerous civilians since the war's end, Onoda received a pardon from Filipino president Ferdinand Marcos. Upon his return to Japan, Onoda was uncomfortable with his celebrity status and the erosion of traditional Japanese values. Onoda moved to Brazil where he became a successful cattle rancher. He occasionally returned to Japan to promote conservative causes, including organizing educational camps for wayward Japanese youths. As of December 2013, Onoda was still alive at age 91.
Tags: WWII  Japanese  soldier  surrenders  1974 
Added: 28th December 2013
Views: 841
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Posted By: Lava1964
Stage Door Canteen the movie poster reads, "Through the doors of the most famous canteen in the world pass the armed forces of all the United Nations where they are entertained nightly by the most famous personalities of stage, screen and radio. Here they find laughter, comradeship and gaiety . . . and dance to music by their favorite big-name bands. Here, too, they find romance . . . while a constant panorama of wonderful entertainment unfolds before their happy eyes. STAGE DOOR CANTEEN brings you 48 great stars . . .6 big-name bands. . . and a poignant and indescribably tender story of a soldier's love in wartime . . . where hours must take the place of years." (The real Stage Door Canteen on 44th Street could not be used for the filming as it was too busy receiving real servicemen. It was recreated in New York and at the RKO Studios in Culver City.)
Tags: film  Stage  Door  Canteen   
Added: 19th November 2007
Views: 1268
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Posted By: Teresa
Civil War Reunions Serving in the Civil War was the defining period in the lives of most soldiers on both sides of the conflict. Not surprisingly, regimental reunions were held for many years afterwards. This is a photo of Confederate veterans meeting in McKinney, Texas sometime during the first decade of the twentieth century. The last major get-together took place in Gettysburg in 1938 where elderly veterans from both armies mingled. From all accounts, it was a moving sight.
Tags: Civil  War  reunions 
Added: 26th July 2010
Views: 2887
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Posted By: Lava1964

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