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1948 Cartoon Predicts America Today Tags: 1948  Predicts  America  Today  Ism  Socialism  Communism  society  free  enterprise  cartoon 
Added: 1st February 2015
Views: 2251
Rating:
Posted By: Old Fart
Elusive Andy Griffith Show Character - Mr. Schwump The Andy Griffith Show has some of the most fanatically devoted watchers of any sitcom in history. Despite their zeal, no one has been able to positively identify the actor who played 'Mr. Schwump' in at least 26 episodes from 1964 through 1968. Actually, fans of the show can't even agree on the character's name. The late Everett Greenbaum, who wrote many of the scripts, claimed the character was actually written as 'Mr. Schwamp,' but it seemed to be pronounced as 'Schwump' whenever he was acknowledged. Whatever the case, Mr. Schwump was the classic background character: He can be seen in crowd shots at Mayberry's social gatherings, at public meetings, at private parties, at church services, sitting on a public bench, as a customer in stores, etc. He never once uttered a single line in any episode nor was he given any screen credit. He is only noteworthy at all because in several episodes Andy Taylor passes by him and says, "Hello, Mr. Schwump." It is generally acknowledged that he appears to be about 60 years old and wears a hairpiece. Efforts by zealous fans to find out who the actor was have proven fruitless. On April 1, 2012 an elaborate post was made on the Facebook page of The Andy Griffith Show Rerun Watchers Club declaring that researchers had determined Mr. Schwump was an actor named Patch S. Wimmers originally from Camp Threw, MS. Although it was supposed to be an obvious April Fools Day prank, many die-hard fans did not realize the information was bogus and still accept the Patch S. Wimmers story as gospel. None of the surviving cast members ever remembers learning Mr. Schwump's real name. One theory claims the mysterious actor was a friend of Andy Griffith and his occasional appearances in the show were an inside joke. Mr. Schwump's true identity remains unknown.
Tags: Mr  Schwump  Andy  Griffith  Show  sitcom 
Added: 4th March 2015
Views: 4481
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Posted By: Lava1964
Wait Till Your Father Gets Home Anyone remember this show? Wait Till Your Father Gets Home was arguably the first animated series created with a totally adult audience in mind. Total Television notes the show 'was strongly reminiscent of All in the Family.' Indeed it was. Between 1972 and 1974, 48 episodes were created by Hanna-Barbera for syndication. Tom Bosley provided the voice of main character Harry Boyle, a typical American father who tried to provide for a family of five. His wife Irma and two eldest children (overweight Alice and lazy Chet) held distinctly different political and social viewpoints than the man of the house, but youngest son Jamie tended to agree with dad most of the time. Rounding out the cast was ultra-right-wing neighbor Ralph Kane whose anti-communist zeal basically turned part of the neighborhood into an armed camp. Ralph was voiced by Jack Burns. This clip shows a brief teaser for a first-season episode and the show's opening credits and theme song.
Tags: animated  adult  cartoon  Wait  Till  Your  Father  Gets  Home 
Added: 24th June 2015
Views: 940
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Posted By: Lava1964
The Second Hundred Years - Sitcom Flop The 1960s were famous for producing far-fetched sitcoms. Here is another that aired briefly on ABC: The Second Hundred Years. Starring Monte Markham and Arthur O'Connell, its crazy plot had O'Connell playing Edwin Carpenter, a man whose gold-prospecting father (Luke) was swept by an avalanche into an Alaskan glacier in 1900. Another avalanche 67 years later conveniently exposed Luke's frozen carcass. Miraculously he was revived--without having aged in the intervening years! Thus Luke now physically resembled his 33-year-old grandson, Ken. (Luke and Ken were played by the same actor, of course, Monte Markham.) Furthermore, for national security reasons, the general public was not allowed to know about this remarkable incident. The show's plots frequently focused on Ken and Luke being able to take the other's place in social situations, and in the culture shock Luke experienced in suddenly going from 1900 to 1967. (In one episode Luke saw a go-go dancer in a cage, thought she was being held against her will, and "rescued" her.) The Second Hundred Years premiered on September 3, 1967 to fairly strong ratings, but it was universally panned by TV critics. Within a very short time it dropped into the bottom 25 network shows and was cancelled after 26 episodes. Here is a promotional clip that aired on ABC just before its premier.
Tags: Monte  Markham  The  Second  Hundred  Years  sitcom  Arthur  O 
Added: 5th April 2018
Views: 255
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Posted By: Lava1964
my old Father this is a 1919, comic strip re-print book. .i had NO IDEA it had been around this long: "Bringing Up Father" was a comic strip created by George McManus that ran from January 12, 1913 to May 28, 2000. Most readers, however, called it Maggie and Jiggs, after its two main characters. The strip was about an Irishman named Jiggs living in the United States who comes into wealth but still wants to keep his old pals, eat corned beef and cabbage (sometimes called Jiggs dinner), and hang out at the tavern, much to the consternation of his wife, Maggie, a social climber.
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Added: 28th May 2018
Views: 163
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Posted By: hieund

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